Do you feel more people are entering nursing only to become APRN's? - page 14

I am not a nurse yet, but I'm an EMT, have worked in and around the hospital, and I am currently finishing my last two prerequisite courses before applying for ABSN programs. It seems like 90% of my... Read More

  1. by   KatieMI
    Quote from Jbgood
    Yes, especially after people start working as an RN and realize this is not what they want to do for the next 40 years. I'm in psych and half the people I work with are in grad school for NP. I wonder where they will all go to work!
    To your already extremely underserved psychiatric population, as well as to medically underserved communities, of which there are plenty in every corner of the USA.

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  2. by   Rekt
    Quote from Jbgood
    Yes, especially after people start working as an RN and realize this is not what they want to do for the next 40 years. I'm in psych and half the people I work with are in grad school for NP. I wonder where they will all go to work!
    They must be wondering the same thing too! So many options and opportunities await!
  3. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from callinshotz
    It seems like the problem lies with the quality of the programs and requirements for admissions. I think there also needs to be a residency requirement.
    What are you basing your opinion on? Your personal or professional experience? The extant data?

    Quote from callinshotz
    One step would be finding other ways to fund program so you aren’t spending half the time working in research projects. They need to replace that with clinical rotations.
    I don't really follow what you mean here.

    As far as adding more clinical rotations, I don't disagree that more clinic time is generally a good thing, but there are two problems with this: 1. there is already a dearth of quality clinical preceptors and 2. what evidence are you going to cite to make this change which would make programs considerably more expensive, reduce the "convenience" you mention above, and increase duration of the programs.

    Quote from callinshotz
    Advance practice nursing is supposed to be for providers who love and respect the foundations of nursing that adhere to the biopsychosocial model and not the biomedical model. Healing the whole person and achieving total health or at least managing the health of the whole person.
    I take it you don't work as an APN? This is a nice sentiment, treating both the disease and the individual's response to the disease, the nursing way. In clinical practice, I'm not sure many providers go to into each room thinking about this.
  4. by   zoo*moon
    Met a nursing student the other day. She says she wants to work in ICU. A few minutes later she mentions working in the ICU again and says yeah I want to be a Nurse Anesthetist (but totally mangles the word) and you have to have a year ICU experience first. I'm shaking my head, feeling sad.
    Side note though how should I correct her and teach her how to say "Anesthetist" correctly? It was shocking how she mispronounced it.
  5. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from zoo*moon
    Met a nursing student the other day. She says she wants to work in ICU. A few minutes later she mentions working in the ICU again and says yeah I want to be a Nurse Anesthetist (but totally mangles the word) and you have to have a year ICU experience first. I'm shaking my head, feeling sad.
    Side note though how should I correct her and teach her how to say "Anesthetist" correctly? It was shocking how she mispronounced it.
    Some of these people really have no firm plans they just are sharing hopes and dreams.
  6. by   KatieMI
    Quote from zoo*moon
    Met a nursing student the other day. She says she wants to work in ICU. A few minutes later she mentions working in the ICU again and says yeah I want to be a Nurse Anesthetist (but totally mangles the word) and you have to have a year ICU experience first. I'm shaking my head, feeling sad.
    Side note though how should I correct her and teach her how to say "Anesthetist" correctly? It was shocking how she mispronounced it.
    As a someone who experienced such "constructive criticism" in full, I would be more than happy to let you know that "teaching English" is a rude and unwelcoming behavior which is below common human decency, leaving alone standards of professional conduct you are supposed to follow at all times.
  7. by   callinshotz
    Quote from BostonFNP
    What are you basing your opinion on? Your personal or professional experience? The extant data?



    I don't really follow what you mean here.

    As far as adding more clinical rotations, I don't disagree that more clinic time is generally a good thing, but there are two problems with this: 1. there is already a dearth of quality clinical preceptors and 2. what evidence are you going to cite to make this change which would make programs considerably more expensive, reduce the "convenience" you mention above, and increase duration of the programs.



    I take it you don't work as an APN? This is a nice sentiment, treating both the disease and the individual's response to the disease, the nursing way. In clinical practice, I'm not sure many providers go to into each room thinking about this.
    As I have stated repeatedly I’m just starting the race. I have stated that I only speak on what I’ve observed and what other APRNs have spoken out about the programs. There are a number of great NP programs and then there are some questionable ones. I think we can all agree on that. So just from the outside looking in (an opinion not worth much) I decided to give my input. One APRN mentioned pointless research projects that take up so much time. When he brought it up to the President of the school she told him she herself agreed. She said that they’d love to do away with some of the research and replace it with more clinical instruction but because of grant funding that was impossible. Again, I’m just getting started but I listen in on these conversations and sometimes join in because this is my future profession. I’m new to nursing but not to healthcare. If I’ve offended the I apologize but I’m trying to understand the problem so I can possible avoid issues in the future.
  8. by   elkpark
    Quote from KatieMI
    As a someone who experienced such "constructive criticism" in full, I would be more than happy to let you know that "teaching English" is a rude and unwelcoming behavior which is below common human decency, leaving alone standards of professional conduct you are supposed to follow at all times.
    So, if it were you mangling some common term in your field, would you rather someone politely corrected you or just let you go on mangling it and sounding like an idiot? I would rather be corrected.
  9. by   KatieMI
    Quote from elkpark
    So, if it were you mangling some common term in your field, would you rather someone politely corrected you or just let you go on mangling it and sounding like an idiot? I would rather be corrected.
    So, do you think that people who moved across the country, speak with an accent, survived traches and other manipulations on their vocal apparatuses, ect., etc. are all sounding like idiots just because they pronounce some words differently? It is quite an interesting point of view for someone who dedicated life to caring for others, I must say.

    One so-called "nurse" who targeted and tortured me all my first year because she somehow found my accent "offensive" and "detrimental for safety", later survived a complicated surgery on her throat. She lately learned to speak again but her speech is still more "accented" and less understandible for strangers than my own and it will likely stay like this till the end of her life. I still refuse to even say "hi" to her although she spent time looking for me and then cried and asked to forgive her for being a cruel and ignorant fool that she was.
  10. by   elkpark
    Quote from KatieMI
    I still refuse to even say "hi" to her although she spent time looking for me and then cried and asked to forgive her for being a cruel and ignorant fool that she was.
    Hmmm, "quite an interesting point of view for someone who dedicated life to caring for others, I must say."
  11. by   KatieMI
    Quote from elkpark
    Hmmm, "quite an interesting point of view for someone who dedicated life to caring for others, I must say."
    Unfortunately, we all have things we won't able to to just let go. Those who say otherwise are likely never experienced enough evil in their entire lives.
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from KatieMI
    So, do you think that people who moved across the country, speak with an accent, survived traches and other manipulations on their vocal apparatuses, ect., etc. are all sounding like idiots just because they pronounce some words differently? It is quite an interesting point of view for someone who dedicated life to caring for others, I must say.

    One so-called "nurse" who targeted and tortured me all my first year because she somehow found my accent "offensive" and "detrimental for safety", later survived a complicated surgery on her throat. She lately learned to speak again but her speech is still more "accented" and less understandible for strangers than my own and it will likely stay like this till the end of her life. I still refuse to even say "hi" to her although she spent time looking for me and then cried and asked to forgive her for being a cruel and ignorant fool that she was.
    I've moved across the country several times, and I was HAPPY to have someone in Massachusetts explain to me that "Comber" was a "coma," that "an elastic" is a rubber band and that "cah" was my automobile. "Angina" is pronounced different ways in different parts of the country -- nice to know these things before some surgeon (and it's always a surgeon) lambasts me for stupidity. Or just walks away thinking I'm stupid or ignorant.

    If it's just correcting pronunciation, I'm happy to be corrected as are most people I know. If it's something else again -- surviving a trach or throat surgery, speaking six languages and occaisionally mispronouncing one in English, etc -- probably it's more than one word that's getting mangled. Personally, I think it's a kindness to correct someone politely and privately.
  13. by   Boomer MS, RN
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I've moved across the country several times, and I was HAPPY to have someone in Massachusetts explain to me that "Comber" was a "coma," that "an elastic" is a rubber band and that "cah" was my automobile. "Angina" is pronounced different ways in different parts of the country -- nice to know these things before some surgeon (and it's always a surgeon) lambasts me for stupidity. Or just walks away thinking I'm stupid or ignorant.

    If it's just correcting pronunciation, I'm happy to be corrected as are most people I know. If it's something else again -- surviving a trach or throat surgery, speaking six languages and occaisionally mispronouncing one in English, etc -- probably it's more than one word that's getting mangled. Personally, I think it's a kindness to correct someone politely and privately.
    And perhaps it's not just the correction of the pronunciation but how it is delivered.

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