Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 33

by TheCommuter 88,739 Views | 364 Comments Senior Moderator

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, “You’re rolling in the big bucks!” To keep things honest, I’ll recall a few... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from bubblejet50
    I make a decent wage. I wont say im raking it in but I do earn enough to support myself and my family without federal aid and that should count for something. I work 3 days a week. Im home for my kids more often and dont have to worry about my funding being cut like I did when I was on welfare. Before prices started to rise I would say I was making good money. Now with gas and food prices increasing I find it more breaking even but thats more than a lot of my friends!
    Are you a two income household?

    Yes, I'm fearing inflation is going to hit all of us hard. Maybe not right away, but in the next several years. Everyone's taxes pretty much will have to go up. There aren't enough huge earners to make up the difference of what we need. Couple this with hyperinflation, and the stagnicity of salaries, well, it will not be what we had been used to.
  2. 0
    Quote from samadams8

    Are you a two income household?

    Yes, I'm fearing inflation is going to hit all of us hard. Maybe not right away, but in the next several years. Everyone's taxes pretty much will have to go up. There aren't enough huge earners to make up the difference of what we need. Couple this with hyperinflation, and the stagnicity of salaries, well, it will not be what we had been used to.
    I make over double what my husband does. So I pay the bills and he covers our "fun." We have a 4yr old and one due any day now.
  3. 0
    Quote from bubblejet50
    I make over double what my husband does. So I pay the bills and he covers our "fun." We have a 4yr old and one due any day now.
    OH, wow! Congratulations! A Christman/Hanukkah Baby! Hope you are feeling well. One of my sons' birthday is two days before Christmas.

  4. 0
    Quote from samadams8
    OH, wow! Congratulations! A Christman/Hanukkah Baby! Hope you are feeling well. One of my sons' birthday is two days before Christmas.

    and I was born on Christmas....! Happy Birthday to us all!!!!! Best wishes to the Momma to be!!!!
  5. 0
    Quote from samadams8
    I am the first one to say that post-secondary schools are all about the money, but to your reply, well, I say wow.

    If you have noticed, however, most places now require or are pushing for BSN baseline for hiring. Far be it for me to tell people what to do, but people can also save money taking a number of general ed. courses and such at the community college and then transfering into a BSN program. I think in the future this should be the role of community colleges for nurses. Help get them started and prepare for transfer. Say whatever you want, but having solely a community college degree it generally frowned upon any more, and in some ways, that is a shame, b/c select community college nursing programs for RN have some great teachers and really good programs. My original school's graduates from ADN beat out GNs from ivy league universities on state board exams. Of course the program has had quite a few ups and downs since then. Overall, nursing will never be respected as a profession (whether you feel it is or not) without at least maintaining that baseline education involves a bachelor's of science in nursing. No other profession does what is done for RNs in this regard. You go into psychology, you need a baseline in the field and then you had better matriculate quickly into a graduate program if you want to work. You can't do OT, PT,teaching, and the like w/o a baseline bachelor's in the area. I'd say everything pretty much I took in bachelor's nursing science program was helpful and important. The things was, however, I went to a private university, and that's what stings in terms of cost. I did it strategically, however, b/c of current/future plans. I would not, however, say that everyone should take out all these loans for private universities for BSN. Go to a public university or see about as many scholarships as you can. In general, it is completely true that the cost of post-secondary education and graduate education is outlandish, period, end of story. Lots of students matriculated into four-year programs, however, take a good number of courses, such as general education, at the community college, and then transfer them back into their four-year programs.

    I just wish all these schools would put a freeze on tuition hikes, b/c they never cease to go up. This hurts nursing as a profession, b/c these folks will do the ADN to save money--some of them will continue on and get the full undergrad degree and up and a good number of them won't. But as long as people can get the ADN and take the RN boards and work, a good percentage will have little impetus to meet baseline educational requires, b/c, well, they have not been mandated as baseline. It is getting harder to get a position or to make vertical moves in the field w/o at least a BSN. This "requirement" has taken forever to implement, and it's nothing official.

    I will say that my private school added value to my approach and actual practice of nursing.
    Private school yikes. That sure does sound like it stings. Why the heck did you do that? Also the BSN will never become the baseline. Until they make the RN boards harder anyways. There is nothing learned in a BSN program that is needed on boards. There are some management things, but most of it is common sense. I know a lot of 40-60 year old nurses that still are working on the floor that have their BSNs. They are no better than nurses with ADNs.
  6. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I'm sure you've heard of the phrase: "Nothing's better than a nurse with the purse."
    My husband says that, and then smiles and says, "Well, one out of two ain't bad."
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from nisteber
    Private school yikes. That sure does sound like it stings. Why the heck did you do that? Also the BSN will never become the baseline. Until they make the RN boards harder anyways. There is nothing learned in a BSN program that is needed on boards. There are some management things, but most of it is common sense. I know a lot of 40-60 year old nurses that still are working on the floor that have their BSNs. They are no better than nurses with ADNs.
    Yeah, this sounds like the CNAs I had as students in nursing school who said, "I know everything a nurse knows except how to give shots, I'm just here for the credential." Are you one of those?

    We'll see how you feel about that callow statement when you are 40-60, or when you or your aging parent or your child is hospitalized and you get some young twit who thinks "all nurses are the same, we all pass the same NCLEX, and besides, age and experience and better education are meaningless." How do you like me now?
  8. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Carla* is a single mother to three children under the age of 10
    The above is the driving factor for Carla's situation.

    I earned $70k in my first year of nursing. Whether someone else considers that "big money" is not my concern, but that is a good middle class income.
  9. 2
    Quote from nisteber
    We get an extra 20 an hour at my place of work when they have a high census. 43$/hour, not bad for a community college degree. Also if you have 50k in student loans, that is poor planning on your part. Nobody forced you to go to a university, a community college ADN, and an ADN to BSN program would have cost much less than 50 Gs.

    I just gotta say, you have no idea what a person's circumstances are that caused them to need to take loans for school. If you are just out of high school and living at home, then yes, maybe it is poor planning.

    But if you are middle aged, single, with a mortgage (with all of the other living expenses that go along with it), raising a child (like I was), and all of a sudden you don't have the good paying job that you once did, then you might be forced into taking loans because you don't have the time for "good" planning to avoid school loans. But thank you for your insight.
    slaughtergryl and PMFB-RN like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from tewdles
    Sounds to me that a CNA going to school to improve her circumstance is not getting a handout but rather a handup.

    It is sad for me the number of otherwise well meaning Americans who despise people for needing help. I think that very few of us do well in life when we are truly on our own. Not everyone comes from a family or social situation that can provide assistance for financial needs...they can't afford to subsidize college, or rent, or food, or transportation for their children. That doesn't make them less American or less valuable than the child born with the silver spoon. Mitt Romney, for example, is no more valuable to the USA because he was born wealthy and has never received welfare as compared to the young man or woman who receives support while getting an education or working toward personal goals which will improve their social status.

    In my view, this "class warfare" is destructive to our society.

    You got it wrong. I don't know of a single person who despises anyone for needing help. It's when people abuse the help that they get that doesn't sit well.


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