Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - pg.17 | allnurses

Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 17

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, "You're rolling in the big bucks!" To keep things... Read More

  1. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8
    I'd have to to the statistical research on your latter point.
    But I do find the "pink ghetto" concept, well, amusing.

    Point well taken with re: to the turnover factor and trying to evolve as a profession.

    But again, I still there overstatement is involved--hundreds of nurses in USA is a drop in the bucket. A large portion of it is fiscal factors--the hiring freezes and such. It's survival economics pure and simple coupled with the fact that more and more of patient services have been moved outside the hospital setting.

    At any rate, I don't remember mama using the term "pink ghetto." LOL Maybe she should have.
    Pink Ghetto: Pink-collar worker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Term has been around for years,well at least since one was in high school and dragooned into taking typing and stenography classes.
  2. Visit  eroc profile page
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    Quote from samadams8
    NO. I don't think that is what is being said or done. Nurses aren't making 12K more per year. Eg., luck to get 2% per year, which doesn't keep up with costs; but at any rate, 2% of say $60,000 = $1200 per year. You think that will cover taxes, commuting costs, and parking. . . LOL?
    I completely understand numbers...she quoted $6 an hour at her workplace. That equals $12k a year.

    And I have done payroll taxes many times. I think a better account is in need for some people.
  3. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Pink Ghetto: Pink-collar worker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Term has been around for years,well at least since one was in high school and dragooned into taking typing and stenography classes.
    I totally don't doubt you at all. Pink Ghetto. .. well, if I ever heard it, it didn't get stored into my memory banks. Seems like a silly term to me; but I look more at employees as either more blue or white collar or those that sit on a red throne with a golden crown, lol.
  4. Visit  anotherone profile page
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    Quote from eroc
    I completely understand numbers...she quoted $6 an hour at her workplace. That equals $12k a year.rqAnd I have done payroll taxes many times. I think a better account is in need for some people.
    $6 is the difference between my pay (2years experience) and the cap pay for floor nurses. meaning no nurse on my flooor or similar units makes more than $6 an hour more. we dont get paid by experience or years working for the company but subjective evaluations and usually a few more cents a year. Nurses in float pool and critical care floats can make more than that.
  5. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
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    closing for staff review
  6. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
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    Several posts from various members have been removed from view as very much off topic to the thread. This thread is going to stay closed for a bit so members can calm down when this thread re opens we respectfully ask that you keep to the topic of the thread which is Do nurses Earn Big Money? posts that go off topic again will be deleted and action taken by staff.

    It is a shame that a good debating thread was taken off topic and I hope that members can be respectful of each other and make their points across without the need to go off topic or pull each other down.
    NRSKarenRN, Esme12, and TheCommuter like this.
  7. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
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    Such a great topic OP, I Know as a unit manager in Ohio I earn a lot less than I did when I worked in Arizona as an RN

    Some of the nurses on my unit earn more than me, as they get extra money for charge and time they either start or finish work.

    I give up really, and didnt even get a raise this year
    redhead_NURSE98! and TheCommuter like this.
  8. Visit  eroc profile page
    3
    Quote from anotherone
    $6 is the difference between my pay (2years experience) and the cap pay for floor nurses. meaning no nurse on my flooor or similar units makes more than $6 an hour more. we dont get paid by experience or years working for the company but subjective evaluations and usually a few more cents a year. Nurses in float pool and critical care floats can make more than that.
    Yes I understand...12k more is a considerable amount. My wife has only gotten a $1 rise in her 2 years on the floor. But she does score highly on her evluations each year.

    And people that have been doing this for 30+ years need to realize it's the same in most ALL fields. And most everyone complains about the same things. Nurses have many more oppurtunities to branch out than the common worker, becoming a true White collar worker.
    But it requires more schooling as does every other field.
  9. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
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    Quote from eroc
    Nurses have many more oppurtunities to branch out than the common worker, becoming a true White collar worker. But it requires more schooling as does every other field.
    Actually, I'm acquainted with multiple nurses who have been able to get promoted to 'white collar' positions in administration that pay more than $100,000 yearly with only associate degrees in nursing. They happened to be in the right place at the right time. They also possess impeccable soft skills and are great at interpersonal communication. They also had connections and/or knew the right people.

    My former DON (director of nursing) has only been a nurse since 2006 and has an associates degree. After working a weekend double option at a local nursing home, she was promoted to the DON position when the previous DON quit abruptly during a terrible state survey. My former DON has been in upper management ever since.

    I know of another RN with an associates degree who has a lucrative position as a corporate nurse with a six-figure salary. My friend is a director of staff development at a LTC facility owned by a national hospital chain and earns $40 hourly ($83,200 annually) with an associates degree.
    joanna73 and BrandonLPN like this.
  10. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
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    I love seeing all the entrepreneurs in Nursing, I wish I had the guts to start a small business
  11. Visit  eroc profile page
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    Actually, I'm acquainted with multiple nurses who have been able to get promoted to 'white collar' positions in administration that pay more than $100,000 yearly with only associate degrees in nursing. They happened to be in the right place at the right time. They also possess impeccable soft skills and are great at interpersonal communication. They also had connections and/or knew the right people.

    My former DON (director of nursing) has only been a nurse since 2006 and has an associates degree. After working a weekend double option at a local nursing home, she was promoted to the DON position when the previous DON quit abruptly during a terrible state survey. My former DON has been in upper management ever since.

    I know of another RN with an associates degree who has a lucrative position as a corporate nurse with a six-figure salary. My friend is a director of staff development at a LTC facility owned by a national hospital chain and earns $40 hourly ($83,200 annually) with an associates degree.
    Yes I agree...I didn't want to start another debate that many are adamant about ;-)
    But a higher degree is the EASIEST way to advance getting your foot in the door. Having an ASN means you have excel on every level vs the "credentails" of the higher degree.

    I am a person with a 8th grade level education (before my ASN) that managed to make 65K a year working as an employee. There is no doubt it can be done with less education.
    Same as hospitals where I live don't require a BSN to start, especially" Magnet" (there are 2 organizations that achieved "Magnet" in town and one is the lowest paying hospital in the city.)
    But people are fully convinced that is the reason they don't get hired...not because of anything they did.
    I know for a FACT both these hospitals hire ASN's nurses.
    Last edit by eroc on Nov 29, '12
  12. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Actually, I'm acquainted with multiple nurses who have been able to get promoted to 'white collar' positions in administration that pay more than $100,000 yearly with only associate degrees in nursing. They happened to be in the right place atthe right time. They also possess impeccable soft skills and are great at interpersonal communication. They also had connections and/or knew the right people.My former DON (director of nursing)has only
    been a nurse since 2006 and has an associates degree. After working a weekend double option at a local nursing home, she was promoted to the DON position when the previous DON quit abruptly during a terrible state survey. My former DON has been in upper management ever
    since.I know of another RN with an associates degree who has a lucrative position as a corporate nurse with a six-figure salary. My friend is a director of staff development at a LTC facility owned by a national hospital chain and earns $40 hourly ($83,200 annually) with an associates degree.
    Very true that advancement opportunities for ADNs in LTC are legion. In LTC there doesn't seem to be any distinction between degrees. I can't tell you how many times I see an ADN as DON while an experienced BSN pushes the med cart.


    But I wonder: Is a DON really a "white collar" job? It seems more like a solidly nursing (and thus "pink collar") job to me.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  13. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    The hospital I work for is part of a very large health care organization. The have "required" BSNs for nurse managers and supervisors for a long time, though there is no discrimination at the staff RN level.
    Despite the "requirement" for a BSN there are a number of nurse managers in the faciliety who have ADNs only, some of them hired long after the "BSN only" for managers became the standard. The just proved themselves to be highly capable and have the skills needed.
    I was offered a house supervisor job, a job I didn't apply for. The job "requires" a BSN but the hospital director told me it was for more important for them to get the "right" person in the job. They get around the BSN requirment by changing the name from "nursing supervisor" to "house charge". Exact same pay and responsibilities.
    A couple years ago I was offered the CV surgery service line manager job at a hospital just starting a new open heart program. That organization requires a MSN for all their managers. They offered me the job, exact same job, same pay, same responsibilities but changed the name to "service line leader" thus eliminating the MSN requirment.

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