Discouraged: Is EVERY public USA nursing program impacted?

  1. I'm a medical assistant with an AAS and want to pursue nursing. The RN programs where I am - CA - are so impacted it's CRAZY!!!!! The wait time for the ADN program is at least 2 yrs and that's AFTER all the prereq's. I'm looking into doing an LVN program b/c it's not impacted and I can get in pretty soon, but I'm wondering if it's worth doing an LVN and then doing a bridge program to an RN. Ultimately I want my BSN. Is it worth the wait/money of just going all out now and going for the RN???? I'm sure there are plenty of private programs I could go through, but I'm already in so much debt from my MA!
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   Jules A
    In my area the LPN programs are almost as competitive as gettng into the RN programs but if there are plenty of bridge programs where you are it might be a good way to go. Its different everywhere but here the pre-reqs are almost the same for both programs so you might need to do them first anyway. Good luck.
  4. by   subee
    There's already a thread in this form about your question. If you want to be an RN, don't bother becoming an LPN. Especially if you want to go to BSN because you want to have as many transferrable credits as possible. You're not going to get to your goal any faster becoming an LPN but you will have time to get your finances in order before going back to school.
  5. by   TazziRN
    In my county both nursing schools take apps each year for the following year.
  6. by   777RNThatsMe
    You still HAVE wait lists in CA ? WOW. Most schools don't even have those anymore it seems!
  7. by   anne74
    To my knowledge, most schools have terrible waiting lists or it's crazy competitive to get in. I went through an accelerated BSN program, and they took 30 people out of 300 applicants. There isn't a shortage of people who want to be nurses, there's a shortage of teachers.

    And why? Because univerisities require instructors to have at least a master's, and then ideally pursuing their PhD. Sure- that sounds logical - however we have a terrible nursing shortage and you don't need a master's degree to teach someone basic nursing skills. In fact, I had one clinical instructor who didn't have her master's yet, and she was the best instructor I ever had.

    In addition, schools don't pay their instructors well - a nurse with an advanced degree can make way more money in a clinical setting, so where is the incentive to teach?

    If we really want to help the nursing shortage, we need to put money into paying teachers. That's where the shortage starts. And then the many people who would make wonderful nurses would have the chance to get their education and join the work force. And in turn, those of us already in the workforce wouldn't be so overworked and understaffed.
  8. by   RebeccaJeanRN
    Quote from anne74
    To my knowledge, most schools have terrible waiting lists or it's crazy competitive to get in. I went through an accelerated BSN program, and they took 30 people out of 300 applicants. There isn't a shortage of people who want to be nurses, there's a shortage of teachers...
    In addition, schools don't pay their instructors well - a nurse with an advanced degree can make way more money in a clinical setting, so where is the incentive to teach? If we really want to help the nursing shortage, we need to put money into paying teachers. That's where the shortage starts. And then the many people who would make wonderful nurses would have the chance to get their education and join the work force. And in turn, those of us already in the workforce wouldn't be so overworked and understaffed.
    :yeahthat:

    I just don't understand why at least the private schools won't pay what the salaries need to be, in order to draw instructors. I understand them wanting advanced degrees in order to teach, but then to not be willing to pay them- yeesh!

    Back to the wait lists, yep, here in CA they still exist...and that will continue until they have enough instructors. The problem in CC schools is that these classes are in the most demand, but if they raise the pay, then they have to raise it for all their instructors with same amount of education- whether or not the classes are in as high a demand or instructors are easier to get. And what they charge students for the courses, combined with what subsidies they get from the gov't, make it prohibitive to do that.
  9. by   JoeyDog
    Totally agree with anne74! You took the words right out of my mouth!!! I will be applying to nursing school next quarter and am so crazy nervous about not getting in! In Washington none of the schools that I know of have wait lists you just apply and apply and apply until eventually (hopefully) you get in.

    I have also been told that LPN school is just as competitive as ADN school. Sometimes more so b/c many LPN schools (in WA) do not require as many prereqs as ADN schools do. I dunno....I can make myself sick thinking about how hard it is to get into an RN program.

    I do wish the hospitals would stop importing nurses to help with the shortage, and start looking at what they can do in this country to fix the obviously broken system. Good luck to you! All us hopefulls need it!
  10. by   Jules A
    Quote from anne74
    And why? Because univerisities require instructors to have at least a master's, and then ideally pursuing their PhD.
    If we really want to help the nursing shortage, we need to put money into paying teachers. That's where the shortage starts.
    Anne, you hit the nail on the head. My school had numbers similar to yours and while I'm sure not all 400 applicants were qualified surely more than 40 were! The other thing that goes on here is that the schools encourage students to repeat pre-req classes in an attempt to get their gpa higher. Personally I think that is a crock and a rip off but many people go for it. Maybe its different because I don't get grant money for school but no way was I taking the same class over. It seems to me like the school is making money on the fact that they don't have enough instructors.
  11. by   cad4296
    Quote from Jules A
    The other thing that goes on here is that the schools encourage students to repeat pre-req classes in an attempt to get their gpa higher. Personally I think that is a crock and a rip off but many people go for it. Maybe its different because I don't get grant money for school but no way was I taking the same class over. It seems to me like the school is making money on the fact that they don't have enough instructors.
    YES Jule this discourages me the most! I'm an A/B student, but not a straight A one. I work 2 jobs, one full time, one part time on top of taking a full load of courses (5 classes this semester) so sometimes I do have to dedicate more time to one class and maybe settle for a B in a less important one (like history that I'm going to memorize and forget) I pay for school completely out of pocket because I work therefore "make too much money for finacial aid" yet if I didn't work I wouldn't eat! I barely make it as it is, I definately can't afford to retake a class for a B! I also pay out of district fees because there isn't a college in my district. It's very depressing to think of it all but what can you do?
  12. by   Jules A
    Quote from cad4296
    YES Jule this discourages me the most! I'm an A/B student, but not a straight A one. I work 2 jobs, one full time, one part time on top of taking a full load of courses (5 classes this semester) so sometimes I do have to dedicate more time to one class and maybe settle for a B in a less important one (like history that I'm going to memorize and forget) I pay for school completely out of pocket because I work therefore "make too much money for finacial aid" yet if I didn't work I wouldn't eat! I barely make it as it is, I definately can't afford to retake a class for a B! I also pay out of district fees because there isn't a college in my district. It's very depressing to think of it all but what can you do?
    I agree 100% and wouldn't take a class over for a B that is for sure. Around here the universities are actually easier to get into for the BSN than the community colleges so if you can't get into a community college you may want to look into a 4 year program. Even though it would cost more and take longer if it is your only option I would consider it. The only other thing that you might want to think about is lightening your load. Sheesh 5 courses would have me in Bs and Cs for sure! If you are only taking 1 to 2 prereqs each semester I'd bet you'll have that A average. Good luck, Jules
  13. by   ckben
    Where I live (Texas), nursing schools seem to be pretty easy to get into, so long as you have the pre-reqs. I haven't heard anybody say they couldn't get in because there wasn't enough space. Of course, that doesn't help if you live in California, but when I applied to nursing school 5 years ago, we heard horror stories about waiting lists in other places. So, if a move would be possible, you might consider it temporarily until after graduation. Otherwise, I guess waiting is the only option...
  14. by   LuvMyGamecocks
    I'm in an ADN program, haven't started clinicals yet. Why? The waiting list to start clinicals is....get this....

    SPRING 2010!!!

    No joke. It's really that long. The kicker? Science classes expire after 5 years.

    There is a special "Merit Admissions" program to apply for each Fall that gets funding from the state legislature to provide an extra 40 students in the next summer and 40 in the next fall. But, the school has to apply for the funding every year...it's not a guaranteed thing to count on year after year.

    So? I'm applying for Merit Admissions this Fall and to another ADN program about 45 minutes from here....with any luck, I'll be finished with school before my kindergartener is!!

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