degree program differences

  1. i work as a patient care tech while working on my RN degree via an on-line ASN program. After talking to several co-workers, and hearing their comments about how students should or should not be required to attend a traditional RN program. The biggest negative comment that i have been hearing is that you will not gain all of the required knowledge from an on-line program that would be required to perform daily duties. what are the general feelings about the two types of programs?
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   mattsmom81
    This kind of program is news to me, as I have not been aware of any programs online that take a patient care tech to an RN without requiring some form of licensed clinical experiences. Do you have a license as an LPN or an EMT or Respiratory therapist? I thought these were requirements...in programs such as Excelsior, which is a fully accredited program.

    Just curious...what program is this? And how is your program addressing formal nursing clinical experience if you work as a PCT?? How will they test for competencies? Is this a fully accredited program?

    I know California College offers a RT program to health care workers, where the RT student arranges clinical time with an experienced RT in a participating facility. Is this how yours works??? If so I am surprised ...didn't think nursing schools worked that way...but ya hear something new every day!!

    I suppose if you are working with supportive RN's to help you learn (and staffing is adequate to provide for it) it could be done..I just haven't been aware of these programs... Good luck to you!

    Anybody else here who went Spongebob's route??
  4. by   spongebob1871
    I forgot to add to my post that i am an emt. But to address the issue about clinical hours, i am using the support of the nurses i work with to learn the skills first hand. I'm going through excelsior college for my degree. They require you to take a practical exam after you complete all of the required exams.
  5. by   spongebob1871
    is it possible to learn the skills you need to be an RN from watching how other RN's work? So far all of the nurses that i have worked with have been very supportive in teaching me.
  6. by   Love-A-Nurse
    originally posted by spongebob1871
    is it possible to learn the skills you need to be an rn from watching how other rn's work? so far all of the nurses that i have worked with have been very supportive in teaching me.
    spongebob! this was one of my concerns as i looked into going throug rue for books, and regent, as it was then, to obtain my rn. first, i was not motivated and passed the first exam (comm a then) and was afraid i would "miss" something without a traditional program. however, i know someone personally who took her general courses at a local community college and took the 6, at that time, nursing classes and passed the one week end "clinical" rotation all in one year. so, it all depends on the student and what exactly what you as the individual is looking in a program and you the individual to put into the program.

    even in a traditional program, one will not improve in their skills and knowledge until one begin to work after obtaining one's license.

    it had been done, it is being done, and will probably continue to be done.

    i do wish you all the best in your endeavors. if this is for you, go and get 'em! let us know how you are doing and how your classes are progressing.
  7. by   spongebob1871
    thank you
  8. by   Love-A-Nurse
    ah that's what we are here for. stick around and join in the fun!
  9. by   Mkue
    welcome spongebob !!


    good luck and welcome to the boards
    i'm glad you found a program that works out for you, let us know how you do.



    marie
  10. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by spongebob1871
    I forgot to add to my post that i am an emt.
    OK, now it makes more sense to me...I was thinking of PCT experience alone qualifying for admission. I know several EMT's and RT's who have done very well in Excelsior! Good luck to you!
  11. by   MollyJ
    Bob,
    I have strong feelings against these programs and I feel they are prime examples of how people like you (consumers of nursing education) are screwed over by a nursing education institution that seems to be having a major identity crisis.

    Keep in mind that I am giving you my opinion and my opinion has nothing to do with whether you are a nice person or not.

    I believe that the body of knowledge that is nursing involves knowledge acquisition, hands-on guided practice and socialization which ideally occurs in the company of other nurses and nursing students. I believe that smart people like yourself are hard-pressed to acquire all of these things in the isolation of a mail order study program with observation clinicals.

    I accept mail order BSN's as a for better or worse aspect of our world. They are what works for many ADN nurses but I have really STRONG feelings about people from other branches of the health profession entering the profession through mail order study. Nursing is not a "see one, do one, teach one" procedure.

    The real tragedy for you as a consumer of nursing education is that you are pursuing a course of study LIKELY accredited by the NLN. The NLN, IMO, is letting you, the consumer, and the profession down in a big way.

    You know, folks, nursing education is a professional undertaking (or it should be). Do you know what you'd call a lawyer who got his or her credential through the mail? a dupe.

    bob, really I'm sure your a nice guy and a smart guy. maybe i'd even find it okay to work with you some day in the future. I just don't think that your course of study is any way for professional nurses to be educated.
  12. by   Tim-GNP
    In nursing, many nurses are stuck in the mentality of 'you should suffer as badly as I did.' I trust that before you enrolled, you assured that the program was regionally accredited by one of the 6 accrediting bodies that accredit schools in the U.S. I also trust that you assured it was approved by the Board of Nursing in your state, and was NLN accredited.

    If you answer yes, to all of the above... ignore the comments of those who will put you down.

    The internet as a communication tool has opened doors to higher education to individuals who never would have been able to advance themselves. When I was an LPN going back for my RN, I can only remember being 'tired' all of the time. After working 11-7 shift, I had to go sit in class [as the classes were only offered during the day]. Now, people can go back at their leisure, and in a way that is congruent with their lives. Institutes of higher education are finally learning that there is a market for students out there that want a quality education, but cannot go sit in classes because of silly little reasons [the need to work, pay a mortgage, etc. ].

    By the way.... I began working on my PhD 2 years ago.... I have been commuting over 2 hours each way... guess what happened??? My school just put the ENTIRE doctoral program on-line. Progess will happen... whether we're ready for it or not!

    Good luck in your studies!
  13. by   mattsmom81
    Wow!! Two totally opposing opinions back to back...I find myself mindboggled!! Isn''t it amazing these days?????We are of course ALL entitled to our opinions....

    If your program is fully accredited and you are willing to put in the extra clinical work yourself (and don't mind being a possible burden to those you work with...they may object to being your 'unpaid trainers') I guess I have to say "'Good luck!!" to you!

    We are within a nursing shortage and I shouldn't be surprised to see 'shortcuts' emerging out there.....and to be honest, I MAY prefer your training over a poor- English speaking foreign nurse....whom I see as a bandaid solution to the US shortage .

    Regardless, you do posess healthcare experience, thus I feel obligated to welcome you .... and I hope you do your best, and are successful.

    Some states offer special 'perks' to BS degrees of ANY origin entering a Nursing program.....personally, I feel that successful healthcare experience in ANY forn should be of SOME merit during the nursing shortage.....JMHO, of course!!

    I understand some may disagree with me and this is OK....we are open to dialogue here....
  14. by   Mkue
    originally posted by tim-gnp
    in nursing, many nurses are stuck in the mentality of 'you should suffer as badly as i did.' i trust that before you enrolled, you assured that the program was regionally accredited by one of the 6 accrediting bodies that accredit schools in the u.s. i also trust that you assured it was approved by the board of nursing in your state, and was nln accredited.

    if you answer yes, to all of the above... ignore the comments of those who will put you down.

    the internet as a communication tool has opened doors to higher education to individuals who never would have been able to advance themselves. when i was an lpn going back for my rn, i can only remember being 'tired' all of the time. after working 11-7 shift, i had to go sit in class [as the classes were only offered during the day]. now, people can go back at their leisure, and in a way that is congruent with their lives. institutes of higher education are finally learning that there is a market for students out there that want a quality education, but cannot go sit in classes because of silly little reasons [the need to work, pay a mortgage, etc. ].

    by the way.... i began working on my phd 2 years ago.... i have been commuting over 2 hours each way... guess what happened??? my school just put the entire doctoral program on-line. progess will happen... whether we're ready for it or not!

    good luck in your studies!



    tim, yahoo, im happy that your program is online now !!!

    i used to spend 2 hours a day on the road commuting to school getting pre-reqs. ugh !

    good luck!


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