Criminal or just Bad Judgement? - page 3

Would like input please... I work sometimes with a male nurse, who I usually enjoy working with. Tonight I had a new admit, who was also a male, so I called the other nurse to come do the skin... Read More

  1. by   wildmountainchild
    Just a point here. The vast, vast, vast majority of sexual predators are straight, as in heterosexual males.

    Not that homosexual males don't victimize but it is much more rare.
  2. by   all4schwa
    Quote from Meerkat
    Thanks, everyone for your input, also for pointing out the reasons for not talking to co-workers. I never thought about the rumour mill thing. I will talk to my supervisor today when I go for a team meeting. Your opinions have confirmed my instincts. You are great!
    By the way, for the poster who said she had never heard of a protocol where we get a same-sex witness for skin assessments, the reason at our facility is because it is a psych unit, and our patients have been known to make allegations of sexual misconduct by staff. Who knows, they might have been right....
    it's more understandable on a psych unit...it woud still be a PIA but I see how it's supposed to be a CYA thing. Not in this case!!

    i see what everyone means about asking around; although, we probably all need that reminder every now and then. If you don't ever say anything but to the NM, then you will know if future accusations are honest and not somebody fabricating a story to add fuel to a fire, on purpose or not.

    another thought, and i dont want this to come off wrong but...why's this guy working on a psych unit anyway? thought maybe he could get his jollies with a few crazies? we all know it's happened....
  3. by   Meerkat
    Good points...
    As to the nature of his old felony, all I know is this: One night he was scheduled to float to children's unit and he flipped out, saying he was 'cleared' to work with kids, they had to put him somewhere else. His story is that a looooooong time ago when he was 20 (he's in 40's now) he was drunk and struck an officer. Somehow that episode is related to why he cannot work with kids. However, he has children of his own and has been married a few times. So I really don't understand....wouldn't a felony from long ago been cleared by now? And what does striking an officer have to do with kids? Maybe kids were present and he was contribting to delinquency or something.
    Anyhow, I reported it today. I hope I did the right thing.
    Thanks for all of your input!
  4. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from TazziRN
    "Asking around", discreetly or not, is akin to contributing to the gossip mill. If others have noticed something, your info will add to it. If they haven't, your info will start the rumors. You should not be asking anyone anything except for your NM. This needs to be reported because it was most definitely inappropriate.
    Here's the other problem with asking around- let's say disciplinary action is taken against him. Now, for just a minute, let's assume that he's gay (or a racial minority, or older, etc....something protected by the EEOC). I'm not trying to infer that his behavior *means* that he's gay, or, if he is, that his sexual orientation has anything to *do* with it. I'm throwing these out there because, if he were to get fired *and* he has a legal reason to sue for discrimination, you don't want to have your name come up as someone who 'asked around' about his behavior.

    Tazzi is right, you need to report him to the NM. state your observations very objectively. I would make sure to say something to the effect of, 'I have observed Mr. Nurse touching patients in a manner that appeared inappropriate' instead of 'Mr. Nurse has been touching *male* patients inappropriately'. Again, just to CYA.

    The patient that deflected your questions about being uncomfortable with this nurse makes me so sad. If the patient *did* feel weird, I can totally understand that he would be reluctant to say so. Men are far less likely to report *any* kind of abuse, and that's very frustrating. I worked with a nurse who had been in a facility where this sort of thing was going on, except the nurse was female, patients were male. The nurse was fired, but I don't know what else happened. My friend said staff had noticed behavior similar to what you described- for a long time- but nothing ever came of it until one patient complained.

    Definitely, definitely report him. This makes me very sad.
  5. by   rach_nc_03
    as for the protocol for having a same-sex staff member in the room during skin assessments- I've seen a lot more attention paid to this kind of thing in recent months, regardless of patient and staff member gender. My physical therapist works in a small practice, and we're often the only people in the office when her assistant steps out. They just posted signs at the clinic stating a new policy like yours. The first time we were alone in the clinic together, she asked if I wanted another staff member to come from the next building. I laughed- I'd already seen her ten times by then. But yes, I think this is getting more and more common.
  6. by   GardenDove
    In my opinion, it should be sufficient to have a staff member of either sex present. These days there's more awareness of homosexuality, and one can't presume that a man or woman won't have an attraction to the same sex. Isn't it outdated to presume that?
  7. by   vampiregirl
    Quote from Meerkat
    Tonight I had a new admit, who was also a male, so I called the other nurse to come do the skin assessment with me, which is protocol.
    What about approaching the issue from the aspect of protocol being violated when the other nurse asked you to leave the room?
  8. by   Meerkat
    Quote from emtrachel
    What about approaching the issue from the aspect of protocol being violated when the other nurse asked you to leave the room?
    good thinking/...
  9. by   jill48
    Trust your intuition. If it feels like something is wrong, then it probably is. And since when do we feel around on hematoma's?
  10. by   Meerkat
    Quote from jill48
    Trust your intuition. If it feels like something is wrong, then it probably is. And since when do we feel around on hematoma's?
    Yep, you're right about that too! Later, the LPN told me there was a 'knot' under the hematoma, so you know he felt around pretty good.
    That was another thing I resented. I love our LPN's, they are wonderful. But as an RN my job is to delegate. I didn't appreciate being told by an LPN, to leave MY patient. I have never 'pulled rank', I don't like that kind of stuff. In this situation though, I do not feel he had any authority whatsoever to instruct me to leave, whether LPN or RN.
  11. by   all4schwa
    Quote from Meerkat
    But as an RN my job is to delegate. I didn't appreciate being told by an LPN, to leave MY patient. In this situation though, I do not feel he had any authority whatsoever to instruct me to leave, whether LPN or RN.
    since when do we delegate assessment anyway?
  12. by   RN BSN 2009
    Definitely inappropriate and shady IMHO.
  13. by   ZootRN
    Quote from Meerkat
    Yep, you're right about that too! Later, the LPN told me there was a 'knot' under the hematoma, so you know he felt around pretty good.
    That was another thing I resented. I love our LPN's, they are wonderful. But as an RN my job is to delegate. I didn't appreciate being told by an LPN, to leave MY patient. I have never 'pulled rank', I don't like that kind of stuff. In this situation though, I do not feel he had any authority whatsoever to instruct me to leave, whether LPN or RN.
    Initial assessment upon admission should be done by RN. I don't understand why he was doing assessment and you were witnessing it, and even left the room. Should be other way around: you were doing assessment, he was just standing there, witnessing. And how did you chart his assessment findings, just because you watched him doing it? If you charted as you did it, it's legally wrong. If you charted that he did it, when he is LPN and you are RN, this is legally wrong either. I really do not see a point of bringing someone for witnessing, when there really was no witnessing: he told you to leave, and you did just that. Maybe he assaulted a patient, how would you know that? Sorry, I don't mean to sound harsh, but you both did not follow the protocol that was initiated by the facility for the reason.

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