CNA/NTs singled out?

  1. My facility just instituted a new one today. NOW we have to give every patient a card that grades the CNA (and of course NT) performance. Were they courteous, did you like their performance (rate it from excellent to unsatisfactory).

    On the whole I have no problem with a form for the patient to complain or compliment on the staff. We have those forms anyway (doesn't everyone?). However, this form is given to the pts (not if they ask, just given), every day, to every patient, regardless (including those who are total-care and just not with our reality).

    The real crux of my problem is that there is only one facet being graded here. The CNAs performance. NOT the nurses, not janitors, food service or any other category.

    Myself, I get praise from patients (many have -to my delight and surprise, as I didn't think anyone actually did this) have written or told my superiors favorable comments on my work -thats a pleasent surprise but then I always strive to go above and beyond, if time permits.

    I don't think its fair though, to force 'em to grade just one facet, every day.

    If anything would make me considder looking elsewhere, this is a biggie. The disparity is disheartening.

    Ok, I'm off my box now.
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   New CCU RN
    I agree with ya there..... either do all or nothing.... Why single out just the CNA/NT's.
  4. by   delirium
    Um, that's weird. It reminds me of those little cards at fast food restaurants: was your food hot? did you get it in a timely manner? was the facility clean?

    I think I would have a problem with this. It seems to be taking the customer service aspect a bit too far... although, surprisingly, I have no problem with the generic surveys the hospital I work for sends to patients after discharge. That's generally the whole hospital experience, though, not the performance of one employee.

    I'm paranoid and suspicious, of course, but I wonder if this is a way to cut back on merit raises? Where do the cards go when they are filled out? Certainly not back to you to screen before they go to the higher ups.

    We have these atta boy cards at work where someone can fill out a card on you if you do a great job, but that's slightly different (and a stupid idea, in my opinion, but I have lots of negative opinions about my place of employment... uh clue phone? This isn't disney world).
  5. by   VivaLasViejas
    This is all part of that customer-service crap that has been rammed down our throats for the past few years. Sometimes I've thought that the only difference between me and the average waitress was about $15 an hour! Now, I do my best to take good care of people, and I certainly don't consider myself above fetching a glass of soda or some ice chips for a pt. and family. But to grade a hospital or nursing home like a McDonald's is nothing short of demeaning. I hope you all will protest this, to the top of the management food chain if need be. We are all professional health care workers, and when we start being treated like service people, it's time to look for another job!!
  6. by   Gromit
    I don't have a real problem with being treated like service personnel (as my girlfriend pointed out, the patients are customers, OUR customers. Ok. Not the way I was trained, but modern times, modern definitions.). My real problem is singleing out CNAs. Had they also handed out a card for RN/LPN(etc)s, as well, or even on the same card, I'd have no issue. And also, EVERY DAY?? Doesn't the hospital (ours does) usually send a form to their home asking about the entire hospital experience?

    Yes, I'm raising some noise about this.

    Very one-sided, and against one facet of the dept., we all play a role, why seek comments only on one part?
  7. by   vaughanmk
    These card seem absolutely ludicrious. What exactly is their rational behind targeting CNA's/ NT's? Is it just one floor or the entire hospital? I wonder if maybe there was a specific event that prompted these cards. If I were you I would really question this new protocol. Try talking to the floor manager next time you go to work. Maybe that will explain the why's behind this scheme.
  8. by   New CCU RN
    HA!!! It does sound like a courtesy card from a fast food restaurant!!!!!!
  9. by   Mofe'ny
    No it doesn't! At least fast food chains usually give you a free hamburger or a coupon for filling out a survey. What do you get for this> One free hour of care by a CNA.

    Seriously, I would have to complain about this too. Grade everyone or no one!!!!
  10. by   New CCU RN
    Hey that is true..... good point
  11. by   emily_mom
    Originally posted by mjlrn97
    This is all part of that customer-service crap that has been rammed down our throats for the past few years. Sometimes I've thought that the only difference between me and the average waitress was about $15 an hour! Now, I do my best to take good care of people, and I certainly don't consider myself above fetching a glass of soda or some ice chips for a pt. and family. But to grade a hospital or nursing home like a McDonald's is nothing short of demeaning. I hope you all will protest this, to the top of the management food chain if need be. We are all professional health care workers, and when we start being treated like service people, it's time to look for another job!!
    Um, when I finish school I will be making less than I did as a server. I averaged $26/hr.....
  12. by   ERNurse752
    If I were a pt, I would think it was a major pain in the a** to fill out a survey card EVERY...SINGLE...DAY...yuck!
  13. by   sjoe
    "the patients are customers, OUR customers."

    WRONG. It is not as though most patients could go to any one of 10 different competitors within a mile and that each facility is aiming strictly at the maximum possible number of customers, hopefully with lines stretching out the door.

    Most patients come to your facility because their insurance plan or "the government" will pay for it, or that is where their doc has admitting privileges, and to get their acute healthcare needs taken care of as quickly and as painlessly as possible so they can go home.

    Facility workers are supposed to have particular skills and abilities and, those who are professionals, work within their professional standards of care--regardless of whether the patients would prefer that they behave as personal servants, waitpersons, secretaries, or whatever.

    There is no reason to go out of one's way to offend the maximum number of patients, but on the other hand, most patients have no idea of what we are doing overall in our jobs, what we need to be thinking about and assessing, what ongoing planning and priority-setting we always need to be dealing with--things that may preclude our giving that particular patient ALL our attention ALL the time, as many would wish. They are in no position, therefore, to "evaluate" us in terms of our performance. That is the position of supervisors who are supposed to be in touch with our patients and their charts and noting how well or how poorly they are being taken care of.

    Of course, most of these evaluations are simply thrown away, after being scanned for obvious "problem employees," since their primary purpose is to give patients the (unfounded) impression that the facility actually cares about them. (Just like the similar evaluations in fast food restaurants.)

    IMHO.

    But to return, after this extended digression, to the original post: What does your union say about this? If you don't have a union,you clearly need one to protect your interests, since a facility can easily misuse (or falsify) this kind of information to suit its own purposes. (You don't think this new policy was instituted to help YOU or your co-workers, do you?)
    Last edit by sjoe on Jan 23, '03
  14. by   ChainedChaosRN
    IMHO we are in the service industry. Only thing that separates us from a waitress is about $15/hr more or less. A client will not come back to anywhere they had bad service, restaurant, hospital, or LTC facility. At least anyone in their right mind wouldn't.

    Health care in America is about making money. The best thrives and lasts. I think the nursing shortage has gone to our heads and we are thinking "they" are lucky to have us. Some of us better get our head out of the sand and take a look at the want ads....they have dwindled down over the last year. Nursing staff agencys are going bankrupt. (at least in my area) The economy has changed.

    I think it's a good thing that someone is asking the client about their service that day. I have to wonder if only one aspect of the care being singled out didn't develop that way from complaints.

    Remember these clients are paying us, not our supervisors. Granted our job has many aspects beyond what a client sees, but if we can't get the basics right of being courteous, prompt and professional, what's the chances the other aspects are being done correctly?

    Dawn

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