Career switch - from 6 figure salary - page 8

Just wanted to share my situation for those of you who are thinking of changing careers -- you are not alone! I currently work in the IT field and make 108k a year (in NJ). I have a 5 month old... Read More

  1. by   smg
    I made the switch from working in Human Resources into Nursing and I regret that decision everyday. My thought process was that I would have more flexiblity in nursing, more time with my family, more freetime. I was COMPLETELY WRONG.
    I work .7 nights and I am so exhausted at the end of my shift that I need to sleep, I can't take care of my family. I missed Christmas, Easter, and I'm going to miss Labor Day (which is when my extended family all takes a vacation together). It is very difficult to switch with co-workers.

    I thought that I would be doing something rewarding in nursing, but most patients and doctors are oblivious to all of the hard work that I (we) do.

    The rest of the world works the normal 8-5 and I miss it more than I ever thought I would.

    I would never go into nursing if I knew then what I know now.

    Just think about it. I haven't read all of the posts for this message, but I had to put my 2cents out there. I did exactly what you are thinking about doing and the benefits are just not there. sorry.
  2. by   leisa22
    I decided to go to nursing school when my daughter was 2 years and my son was 3 months old. I just graduated and have been applying for jobs. I have found that many hospitals dont work with your schedule but many do. I needed straight days and found a job offering me 3 -12 hours shifts a week with no weekends or 5 - 8 hour shifts monday -friday. I searched for jobs in at least 6 different areas and in each area I found hospitals will to work with my schedule.
  3. by   Quickbeam
    Quote from leisa22
    I decided to go to nursing school when my daughter was 2 years and my son was 3 months old. I just graduated and have been applying for jobs. I have found that many hospitals dont work with your schedule but many do. I needed straight days and found a job offering me 3 -12 hours shifts a week with no weekends or 5 - 8 hour shifts monday -friday. I searched for jobs in at least 6 different areas and in each area I found hospitals will to work with my schedule.
    Best wishes to you. Often what a hospital offers and the realities of day to day scheduling are different. Very different. Many of us speak from decades of experience on the floors so you have to forgive us if we're sometimes a bit skeptical.
  4. by   Quickbeam
    Quote from smg
    I made the switch from working in Human Resources into Nursing and I regret that decision everyday. My thought process was that I would have more flexiblity in nursing, more time with my family, more freetime. I was COMPLETELY WRONG.
    I work .7 nights and I am so exhausted at the end of my shift that I need to sleep, I can't take care of my family. I missed Christmas, Easter, and I'm going to miss Labor Day (which is when my extended family all takes a vacation together). It is very difficult to switch with co-workers.
    Word to your entire post, smg. Of my accelerated nursing class, I am the only one left with an active license. Most quit because of issues mentioned in your post.
  5. by   indigo
    I so understand and empathisize with your desire to have a professional life and be able to mother your child in the way that you want to. But I would not recommend nursing unless you really feel you have a calling for it. I am still a student, but I couldn't imagine making the sacrifices that nursing entails if I didn't strongly feel called to do it. For what other reasons are you interested in nursing besides having a schedule you want and a job whenever you need it?

    When I begin my nursing career I imagine I will have to take what I am offered in terms of a schedule. To make good money, I'll have to work a lot of hours. Even so, I feel grateful to be entering the profession and if that's what you decide to do, the best of luck to you!!
  6. by   Thornva
    Quote from Stopnik
    I am in a very similar position - work in a consulting field and make a similar salary. I decided to go back to school in August 2004 and become a respiratory therapist (was considering nursing - decided on RT). I am VERY worried about the money issue - but I am very attracted by the medical field and the flexibility when children come. But I am still reeling in my head about the paycut...
    I am also making a career change to Respiratory Therapy after working in various office positions for the past 16 years. I originally looked at nursing but decided on RT for several reasons. My goal is to get into critical patient care...I shadowed a couple of RTs in the ER and Trauma units and could easily picture myself in the RT role. I also find the idea of specializing appealing. Finally, I didn't want to wait a year (or probably longer) to get into a nursing program. The programs that I've looked into around here (suburban DC) all have waitlists and won't allow you to apply until you've finished the prerequisites. I've been accepted into a second degree BS Respiratory Care program which starts this August. It's 3 semsesters which means that I'll be taking my exam next August (2005).

    Making a major career change at 38 is a little frightening. I know the paycut will bite but I figure it's a small price to pay in order to move into a field that I will find personally challenging and rewarding.

    Best of luck to all of you.
    Last edit by Thornva on Jun 29, '04
  7. by   MsBruiser
    Best of luck to you, too! Unfortunately, I have to go to a "traditional" AA degree program to get my RRT -- four semesters. None of my previous degrees count...glad to see another fellow RT to be student lurking about. There are some RT boards but they cannot compare to this one!




    Quote from Thornva
    I am also making a career change to Respiratory Therapy after working in various office positions for the past 16 years. I originally looked at nursing but decided on RT for several reasons. My goal is to get into critical patient care...I shadowed a couple of RTs in the ER and Trauma units and could easily picture myself in the RT role. I also find the idea of specializing appealing. Finally, I didn't want to wait a year (or probably longer) to get into a nursing program. The programs that I've looked into around here (suburban DC) all have waitlists and won't allow you to apply until you've finished the prerequisites. I've been accepted into a second degree BS Respiratory Care program which starts this August. It's 3 semsesters which means that I'll be taking my exam next August (2005).

    Making a major career change at 38 is a little frightening. I know the paycut will bite but I figure it's a small price to pay in order to move into a field that I will find personally challenging and rewarding.

    Best of luck to all of you.
  8. by   NDivine
    "Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage" Anais Nin
  9. by   Drysolong
    Quote from quickbeam
    i was surprised the original poster didn't look into part time it work. more time off, more time with child.

    i agree with those who say that most nursing jobs are the least flexible of any work i've seen. i'm a career change nurse and was not prepared for that. as evidenced by many posts, there are some nice rn careers out there which allow you to have the schedule of your choice...i work m-r, 10 hour days, no weekends, no holidays. it did take 20 years to find that job, however!

    re: the idea of nursing as ideal for parents of young kids...well, i can't let anyone walk away from this thread thinking that. if you think the waters part and that people are anxious to fill your holidays, sick kid days, maternity leaves, etc etc...whew, so wrong. every worker deserves equal respect, not just parents of young kids. you will rapidly become a persona non grata if you are constantly begging people to cover kiddee birthdays, ear aches, christmas, etc. for you. just fair warning.
    [color=maroon]there is great truth in the saying "different strokes for different folks". i am a student changing careers to nursing. it's interesting that you say it took you 20 years to get weekends off. in my last job (non-medical), everyone vied for the 9-5 m-f positions. i was "forced" into a 9-5 m-f job because our department eliminated nights and weekends. i was devastated. i intensely dislike (i'm trying to stop using the word -hate ) those "desirable" shifts. mind you, i like some weekends off because that's when everyone else is off, and people tend to get married, attend religious services, etc.on the weekends) but for the most part, nights, overnights, and weekends are when i prefer to work i have always been able to work my schedule around these times.

    [color=maroon][font='times new roman'] from your comments about holidays, i think my future co-workers are going to love me because i will work for them on these type days.
  10. by   Drysolong
    Quote from smg
    i made the switch from working in human resources into nursing and i regret that decision everyday.

    i would never go into nursing if i knew then what i know now.

    just think about it. i haven't read all of the posts for this message, but i had to put my 2cents out there. i did exactly what you are thinking about doing and the benefits are just not there. sorry.
    [quote=drysolong]
    have you looked into other nursing opportunities? i once worked in the benefits department of a large company that employed nurses in the disability department. they worked "normal" day hours doing mainly paperwork and employee interviews. what about clinics, medical offices, schools, etc.? from previous experience, it is no fun doing something you don't like day after day.
    i am currently a student and i am looking forward to my nursing career. i am learning a lot from this discussion board as well as talking to nurses that i know. i am going to explore more desirable options (for me) as much as my limited experience will allow me when i graduate. in my area (atlanta) there are a lot of 3 day 12-hour shifts being worked. and in other parts of the state 12-hour weekend shifts. what's happening in your area?
  11. by   InTheBlood
    Just my 2 cents. You CAN make a lot of money being a nurse. I made $107K last year, but I did work quite a bit.....probably averaged somewhere around 52-54 hours/week. I'm PRN, and I work nights so my night diff. helps some. That said, I'm starting CRNA school in August so that I can make much more money and not work as much and less physically demanding. It's very easy to get burned out working as much as I have the last 2 years since I got out of nursing school. I still think nursing is a great field to get into. Just be careful not to work too hard.
  12. by   marys
    Hello ThornVa..


    That is why I am now living in Goodwell, OK. I was able to get into their nursing school almost right away without a wait. I investigated the Washington State area and there was a 3 year waiting list, and to top it off, I would have had to re-take all of my sciences since they were over 5 yrs old. You really have to shop around and find the best program and what is right for you in the Medical field. I am hoping that I can still utilize my background in IT and provide Nursing care. My golas are Research Nursing and Nurse Practitioner, and to get back to Washington State..
  13. by   Thornva
    Quote from marys
    Hello ThornVa..


    That is why I am now living in Goodwell, OK. I was able to get into their nursing school almost right away without a wait. I investigated the Washington State area and there was a 3 year waiting list, and to top it off, I would have had to re-take all of my sciences since they were over 5 yrs old. You really have to shop around and find the best program and what is right for you in the Medical field. I am hoping that I can still utilize my background in IT and provide Nursing care. My golas are Research Nursing and Nurse Practitioner, and to get back to Washington State..
    Hi Mary,

    That's great that you can relocate to attend nursing school. I wish you all the best. Although the waitlists and prerequisites for the local nursing schools were factors in my decision, there are other reasons why I'm choosing RT. You're absolutely right about shopping around to find the best medical career that will fulfill our personal goals. I learned about the RT profession while researching a potential nursing career. I had anticipated attending my local CC for RT when I discovered that a nearby university offers a BS. Even though it's 90 miles away, I only have to drive there 2-3 days a week for 2 semesters. Fortunately, they'll allow me to take my clinicals much closer to home. I'm interested in emergency/critical care where RTs play a large role along with the nurses and doctors. I'm just not sure whether or not I want to specialize in adult or pediatric care. I'm hoping that I'll figure that out when I start my clinicals.

    Regards,

    Corey
    Last edit by Thornva on Jul 2, '04

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