Career in physical therapy vs. nursing.. - page 3

Thoughts, experiences, advice, anything?... Read More

  1. by   RN4NICU
    In general, PTs earn than nurses, as well they should. They are (at minimum) master's prepared and are moving toward doctoral degrees as entry-to-practice. More education = more $$. This is how most of the world outside of nursing works.
  2. by   user9876
    you're right, that's certainly how it should be. thanks!
  3. by   narsingboy
    yea i was thinking the same thing.. m kinda in a career dead-end.. i was thinking whats better?

    a PT in the gym sports setting or a Nurse in a hospital...

    of-course they have their own pros/cons on the situation... i just dont know where i want to go... maybe someone can help me out on that...
  4. by   SeekingBSN
    Can anyone reccommend a major for prospective PT students to get their bachelor's in? I've been considering a Bachelor's in Exercise and Health Science.
  5. by   markuskristian
    Quote from SeekingBSN
    Can anyone reccommend a major for prospective PT students to get their bachelor's in? I've been considering a Bachelor's in Exercise and Health Science.
    Perhaps kinesiology?
  6. by   I love my cat!
    My sister is a PT.
    She also, has a degree in Psychology, is a Pilates instructor and is a Certified Personal Trainer.
    She gets amazing pay and wonderful benefits. She has great hours, no OT, no weekends. She gets all of her breaks w/o begging and gets them at the appropriate times. No eating as she works, no begging to use the bathroom. Her environment is clean and neat. She never, ever has to play maid/waitress and she usually doesn't have to deal with any family members.
    She doesn't find it monotonous at all (but that isn't to say that other PTs might).
    She sees people of all ages. She does office PT as well as pool therapy. She also sees private-pay patients in their homes and she gets anywhere from $100-$200 an hour.
    I am so proud of her!! She's finishing her Doctorate in June.
  7. by   SingDanceRunLife
    I've thought about doing PT, but I've spent so much time as a PT patient that I don't think I would enjoy it because I would always think of the torture I endured. (Yes, I do mean torture, PT as a patient is awful even though I absolutely love my therapist and the PTA who works with her).

    I'll be starting school for nursing in the fall.

    BUT, I will say, PT doesn't seem boring at all! You get all different types of people ranging from little kids to senior citizens, all with different problems, different abilities and such. And at least where I've gone, the monotonous exercises are done by the patients and facilitated by the PTs and PTAs who just watch and correct while often doing something else like working with another patient.
  8. by   sunray12
    Quote from I love my cat!
    My sister is a PT.
    She also, has a degree in Psychology, is a Pilates instructor and is a Certified Personal Trainer.
    She gets amazing pay and wonderful benefits. She has great hours, no OT, no weekends. She gets all of her breaks w/o begging and gets them at the appropriate times. No eating as she works, no begging to use the bathroom. Her environment is clean and neat. She never, ever has to play maid/waitress and she usually doesn't have to deal with any family members.
    She doesn't find it monotonous at all (but that isn't to say that other PTs might).
    She sees people of all ages. She does office PT as well as pool therapy. She also sees private-pay patients in their homes and she gets anywhere from $100-$200 an hour.
    I am so proud of her!! She's finishing her Doctorate in June.
    Sounds like she has a good job.

    Questions
    a) Does she bill at that rate or is that all hers?
    b) Any slow down in clients due to the economy? I ask because I know that people who need pt and have had to give it up because they lost their insurance or were bumped to a different provider who won't pay for it.
  9. by   VinoLover2030
    A nurses job can get monotonous as well, so lets not get it twisted. I love being a nurse and you can very likely do both. I plan to. I have my RN and will be going back to to get my AS in PT( ie PTA) then going on for my BS. You can work in various areas and specialties as well.I know PT's that do hospice( yes hospice), hospitals, homecare, MRDD centers. You are not limited to one area.If it is is your dream to so dont count yourself out. If money is the issue. My dad always told me " if you want to know or have a good idea about a career you want, then yes do your research ...but look at the news paper and see which jobs continue to have a need. You will notice that healthcare is one of the largest. Now look at the specialties,,(RN, PTA,PT, Cota, OT,ST,dental assistant, cna, STna) you get the point.The board may be a bit biases but we are not all biased. I hope you follow your heart and so your research. You know most places will let you job shadow with folks so maybe try that
  10. by   PT2RN
    I was currently in PT school but decided to withdrew do to attending a very unprofessional program with very poor and negative faculty. I have currently applied to an aBSN program and hope to get accepted for May 2011. I also applied to PT programs that are very professional with great faculty but I am hesitant of going back to PT school after having a negative experience from my last program. I feel jaded. If I get accepted to nursing school I will most definitely pick that over going back to PT school because I want to be more involved with the medical treatment of the patient ( ie medications and real care inside and out). I just wanted to let you all know that aBSN and PT programs are both incredibly difficult to get into. I'm looking forward to hearing back from the school I applied to and am looking forward to a rewarding career as a nurse and then hopefully an NP or Nurse Anesthetist. Any one else go form therapy to nursing?
  11. by   PT2RN2CRNA
    I graduated with a BSPT (back then it was a 5 yr. bachelor's degree only) and worked for 3 years as a PT until my employer, who was sponsoring my work visa decided to shut down their business operations. I was forced to convert my work visa to a student visa to avoid being sent back home (no work= invalid work visa). I decide to get my associate's degree in RN. After one semester in nursing school, I was re-sponsored by another therapy company for a green card. I worked part-time for the company as a PT, averaging 25 hours a week while continuing to pursue my RN degree. After graduation, I worked full time as an RN in ICU and part-time as PT to make-up the salary difference. I was making less working as an RN full-time but enjoyed working in critical care. After 1 1/2 years in ICU, I applied in CRNA school and was accepted right away on my first try. I became a CRNA at age 32 and have been practicing for 6 years now at a teaching hospital 4 days a week doing different types of anesthesia for different surgeries as well as OB anesthesia. I also keep a solo practice 2 days a week (averaging 9 hours a week) with 2 opthalmologists in a busy cataract surgery center. I love my current job now. I also get a lot of vacation time...on average 6 weeks a year. I still keep my PT license active and currently pursuing a terminal degree, an ScD in PT with a focus on orthpedics and manual therapy while working 2 jobs and being a family man. I hope of getting in academia someday or branching out to pain management where I can combine my diagnostic skills and manual therapy as a PT and anesthesia.

close