Can anyone tell me why there is a nurse shortage??? - page 5

I will be a new nursing student in the fall but am wondering why so many people are leaving the nursing profession? :confused: Could some of you help me out here and let me know what is going on. ... Read More

  1. by   Nurse Ratched
    With credit to http://www.workjoke.com/projoke36.htm

    Top 10 reasons to become a nurse

    1. Pays better than fast food, though the hours aren't as good.
    2. Fashionable shoes & sexy white uniforms.
    3. Needles: It's better to give than to receive.
    4. Reassure your patients that all bleeding stops....eventually.
    5. Expose yourself to rare, exotic, & exciting new diseases.
    6. Interesting aromas.
    7. Do enough charting to navigate around the world.
    8. Celebrate the holidays with all your friends.....at work.
    9. Take comfort that most of your patients survive no matter what you do to them.
    10. Courteous & infallible doctors who always leave clear orders in perfectly legible handwriting.

    - a little levity first...

    The reasons for the shortage are twofold - on a macro scale it's demographics/population trends as Acnorn has enumerated. On a micro scale it's the individual experiences of each of us that lead us to recommend or not (consciously or not) nursing as a career, multiplied by our numbers. The first no one can control. The second is primarily in the control of the people at the top. More and more nurses choose to vote with their feet (up to and including leaving the profession entirely) than continue to accept what health care has become in the pursuit of the dollar.
  2. by   Flo1216
    Very well put. You verbalized that much better than I could have.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I once had a tshirt with all those things on them, NurseRached. Truly funny. ITA w/your post.
  4. by   Texman
    Griping and complaining can do nothing but positive things. Although the tone seems negative, the outcome is positive as more nurses realize the truth, "plenty of doctors, plenty of patients, plenty administrators, plenty bosses, a shortage in the trenches." When market forces are allowed to run (i.e. high demand for good nurses, very low supply) what is bound to happen is the price will go up if we will keep up the pressure and not be satisfied with less. This is bad for everyone but the nurses, which is O.K. with me. Pay the price or work short handed, exhaust the good nurses you have now, and cause more of a shortage. When pay gets up there equal with the doctors (they can't work without us, we do our job without them) I would say it may be time to stop the unrest. I say keep up the unrest, keep up the complaining, quit offering band aids to the hospitals by working when they are short handed. Work when you want, not when they want you to. Nurses are in the driver's seat, we just need to realize that as a whole and start driving. Hospitals all over the nation are offering huge sign on bonuses. Maybe they are getting the message. Send it out every chance you get. Griping and complaining is good. Passive acceptance is going nowhere fast.
  5. by   mamabear
    How many other "professionals" punch a time clock, wear uniforms, work weekends/holidays/off-shifts
  6. by   Gomer
    What makes you think nurses are "profesionals"? And, haven't we had this professional/laborer discussion (on this board) before?

    Are pharmacists professionals? Are physical therapists? Are OT's?

    What is the definition of a professional?
  7. by   Dr. Kate
    All the reasons I've ever heard are here. Why now? These thigns tend to be cyclic. But truly something more is going on. There are 10 hospitals in the area where I work (15 mile radius, give or take a bit.) For 25 years, the area was considered to be over-bedded (more hospital beds than they needed.) In the last 18 months, every one of those hospitals has experienced a booming census. Did the whole world get sick at the same time? Did it take people 20 years to notice they were sick? I don't know why this is happening now. No one has even ventured to propose a reason for this phenomenon. One of the places I work is a trauma center. People say, well it's busy there because of the trauma center. Wrong again. Trauma doesn't fill the units to overflowing. Demand is just outstripping resources. Nurses are resources. But, so are RTs, PTs, SWs, dieticians, etc, etc. Schooling is time consuming and minimally 3 years behind need. And if tax payers don't want to pay for healthcare, they really don't want to pay for educating healthcare workers. Seems shortsighted to me. But, that's what I see happening in my little corner of the world.
  8. by   easygz
    1. Baby Boomer are gettin' old and we are breking down by the thousands.
    2. Better less invasive procedures push us into getting checked out, only to find we need your services.
    Best,
    Greg
  9. by   downerteam
    THE REASON THERE IS A NURSING SHORTAGE, IS BECAUSE OF NURSES ALWAYS COMPLAINING AND NOT USING OUR OWN POWER TO CHANGE THINGS.
    wE NEED TO STOP COMPLAINING AND START ACTING, WE NEED TO RECRUIT BRIGHT STUDENTS AND ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO ENTER NURSING NOT SCARE THEM AWAY.
  10. by   H7482
    because we are "TOO SHORT"?

    I personally had to quit working in the hospital after I injured my back. It was the 7p to 7a shift on Easter Sunday. I volunteered to work (no extra pay for holidays, I was thinking of the nurses with kids) They scheduled two LPN's (yes, I'm a Low Paid Nurse) and the RN charge with 9 surgical patients to get ready for transfers and Monday surgeries. Plus 2 admissions because the medical floor got fed up with all the admissions they were getting.

    I was actually assigned to the medical floor but they floated me out ALOT because I didn't complain as much as the others. and the other areas had never complained about me.

    If they thought more of the nurses they have so many would not be leaving the profession to do other things. There isn't really a shortage, just a shortage of nurses working in the hospitals.
  11. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    FOOD FOR THOUGHT:
    WE EAT OUR YOUNG
    BURN OUT
    LACK OF RESPECT
    RODE HARD AND PUT UP WET
    OVER WORKED UNDERPAID
    UNAPPRECIATED
    WALKED ON LIKE A BAD RUG
    TALKED TO LIKE A CHILD BY DRS
    LOOKED AT LIKE MORONS
    PAID LIKE WE WORK AT MC DONALDS
    ASSEMBLY LINE NURSING

    WHY WE DO IT
    ITS WHAT WE DO AND WE DO IT EVERY DAY AND IM A GLUTEN FOR PUNISHMENT
    AND A SMILE FROM A PATIENT TAKES ALL OF THE OTHER STUFF AWAY
    AND TO SEE THE YOUNG NURSE CRAWL HER SELF OUT OF THE OLDER NURSES THROAT, AND BE A BETTER NURSE THAN HER!!!
  12. by   H7482
    That was well put.

    I never ate the new nurse or the students in clinical on the floor. I remembered that look in their eyes from the inside. That feeling in your heart that THIS is what you want to do with all your heart. I remember being so tired but still studing at 2:30 am for an exam...because I didn't want to be a"C" nurse.

    I miss floor nursing every day. I feel like a piece of my heart is numb and that I am not doing what God wants me to do. I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome after a back injury (at work). I fought the hospital tooth and nail to go back to work, and won when I reminded them of the ADA. I lasted five shifts.

    I couldn't work a full 12 hr shift, so I was scheduled for 6 hr shifts. BUT they didn't schedule anyone for the other six hrs. I quit so that my fellow nurses would not have to continue to pick up extra patients because management had a point to prove. I loved my job and my fellow nurses...LPN or RN it didn't matter. We are sisters in the care of people in need of adequate staffing and well trained nurses.
  13. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    With a heart like yours Its a shame they couldnt work something out. Your knowledge and wisdom is so welcomed to be listened to by me anytime . I do hope that you begin to feel better and remain a healthy and happy one. Much Love Zoe

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