Bsn

  1. As a nurse with an AD I always wanted to go back for my BSN. I have been a nurse for 2 1/2 years and I am currently in an RN-BSN program. It has taught me nothing. It is a waste of my time and also very boring. The only reason I continue with this program is because you need a BS degree to get into Law school. Here in NYC the BSN nurses receive about $1,500 more a year.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Genista
    How sad for you!
  4. by   RNforLongTime
    That's pretty good actually. I work in PA and NONE of the hospitals that I've worked at have paid BSN's a differential.

    I chose to get a BSN cause I knew that I would have more career options. It all depends on WHY you are going for the BSN? Nursing school is what you make of it.
  5. by   Teshiee
    There is nothing wrong going for the higher degree but in nursing I see getting a BSN as a bridge to go to the next level like Msn or advance practice. My only interest in getting it is to become an advance nurse practitioner which in the end you have to get that MSN. As far as pay there isn't any significance which is sad because if any advancement you make you should be rewarded for it!!!!!
  6. by   lpnga
    yes well my nursing instructor got her nursing assistant in the 70's while working on her ADN and then in 1998 got her BSN and now working on her MSN and she is in her 50's....go for it...
  7. by   Q.
    Originally posted by kona2
    How sad for you!
    I second that. I've found that you get out what you put in to things.
  8. by   llg
    Originally posted by Susy K
    I second that. I've found that you get out what you put in to things.
    I agree wholeheartedly, Suzy. If a student doesn't want to get much out of a program, he/she won't. If a student wants to take the opportunity to use that program (even if it is mediocre) to learn and grow, it can be done.


    Anyone can sit in class and do the minimal assignments and get only letters after their name -- regardless of how good a program might be. It takes motivation and effort to make something of an experience -- to turn a mediocre program into a valuable learning experience.

    It's up to the student to make something of their education.

    llg

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