Blow out at the desk, who was at fault? both share blame I think? - page 11

I was in charge yesterday and when I got there at 0700 I was told we would be getting a patient (a GI doc's receptionist) for 3 units of blood and go home. I assigned the patient and told the nurse... Read More

  1. by   Thunderwolf
    Just a friendly Mod reminder to post respectfully.
  2. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    Quote from sjrn85
    A second call from the blood bank was a cue. Regardless of what the other nurse "should have" done, when you're in charge, ultimately, you're responsible. And yes, I have had to do so myself when I was charge (in M/S, peds, and ED).
    I agree with this. My concern is that when the blood bank called again, the reminder was meant for the nurse and wasn't passed along. As a supervisor myself, I know how easy it is to assume things are taken care of. I'm sure that if you were in that nurse's position you would have had the blood picked up and hung. It's easy to assume that she is as competent as you seem to be. I've had times that I assumed such myself. However, when the second call from the blood bank came, I believe you should have told the nurse "The blood bank just called again, you are going to take care of this, right? Can you call then and tell them when you'll pick it up?" or something similar. When you told them she would take care of it after her med pass, you were assuming too much. Obviously the blood bank thought a reminder was in order, and so do I.

    By the way, congratulations on the birth of your grandchild- Wyatt is simply beautiful.

    Lori
    Last edit by LoriAlabamaRN on Nov 11, '05
  3. by   DusktilDawn
    I think what we all need to bear in mind here, is that anothers place of work is not like our own. How things run where you work, is not the way it may run elsewhere. Also how the Charge nurse functions where your at, may not be how a Charge nurse functions at another facility. Same goes for what the responsibilities of the Charge nurse role may be.

    When others post in regards to a situation at work, we tend to relate to it from our own perspective, which includes our work environment perspective. We need to bear in mind how that may color our perception when someone makes a post in regards to a work related incident.
  4. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    Quote from DusktilDawn
    I think what we all need to bear in mind here, is that anothers place of work is not like our own. How things run where you work, is not the way it may run elsewhere. Also how the Charge nurse functions where your at, may not be how a Charge nurse functions at another facility. Same goes for what the responsibilities of the Charge nurse role may be.

    When others post in regards to a situation at work, we tend to relate to it from our own perspective, which includes our work environment perspective. We need to bear in mind how that may color our perception when someone makes a post in regards to a work related incident.
    You're absolutely right. I hope I made that clear in my above post- I AM comparing it to my facility. However, unless anyone here actually works there, doesn't that sorta go without saying?
  5. by   oldiebutgoodie
    I have read this thread ad nauseum, and I have several observations:

    1. Playing the blame game is usually counterproductive
    2. Yes, the nurse needs some re-educating on prioritization
    3. This re-educating should be done in private
    4. There is a concept in business in which the process, not the people, are investigated when there are problems.
    5. This is not to renege on personal responsibility, but it seems that far too much energy is being spent in this situation on blaming everybody--the charge nurse, the nurse, the patient. Figure out how to fix this and move on, for heaven's sake.

    Oldiebutgoodie
  6. by   DusktilDawn
    I was in charge yesterday and when I got there at 0700 I was told we would be getting a patient (a GI doc's receptionist) for 3 units of blood and go home. I assigned the patient and told the nurse that the patient had arrived. At 0815 the BB called to say that the blood was ready and I told the nurse. At 0845 BB called back to say the blood hadn't been picked up yet. (they never do this but figured hey she works for the GI doc) I told them the nurse was almost through making her morning med pass and would be there shortly. Now fast forward to 1100.
    Lori, my post wasn't specifically directed towards you, so I apologize if that is how it appeared.

    It just seems that the big bone of contention on this thread is in regards to a 30 minutes between phone calls. Apparently the supervisor in this situation backed the Charge nurse, not the new nurse who called the supervisor. I think it bears repeating that the role of Charge nurse varies greatly depending on the facility.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from oldiebutgoodie
    I have read this thread ad nauseum, and I have several observations:

    1. Playing the blame game is usually counterproductive
    2. Yes, the nurse needs some re-educating on prioritization
    3. This re-educating should be done in private
    4. There is a concept in business in which the process, not the people, are investigated when there are problems.
    5. This is not to renege on personal responsibility, but it seems that far too much energy is being spent in this situation on blaming everybody--the charge nurse, the nurse, the patient. Figure out how to fix this and move on, for heaven's sake.
    Oldiebutgoodie
    So well-said.
  8. by   Balder_LPN
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    I've been a nurse for 30 years and clearly understand HIPAA and no I did not violate HIPAA. He is her doc, but thanks for your opinion anyway.

    I was on the floor yesterday and was so overwhelmed, really really bad day. I asked for help and I got it. I never mind asking for help. I rarely do, maybe twice a year but I'm smart enough to know when I need to ask for help.
    oops, posted before I read the quote. I did another HIPAA rant, and then saw that the pt was her bosses PT, that changes the picture.

    there is no breach confidentiality per HIPAA since the information to be discussed is relevant for the MD to know about in relation to providing pt care. It would be another story if he was just the pt's boss who happened to be an MD and not part of her health care team
    Last edit by Balder_LPN on Nov 25, '05
  9. by   DutchgirlRN
    Just a post script. Not meant to re-start any of this controversy since it's been beat to death once already.

    I worked last Sunday and was in charge. The nurse referred to in this thread came up to me and asked to talk. She sincerely aplogized to me and told me that she appreciated me being honest enough to tell her how dangerous it was for her not to be checking on that patient and that she had gotten so upset because she was scared something would happen to the patient. I told her Thank You. I told her most important was to ask for help anytime you need it. Not 15 minutes later two of her patient began circling the drain. She asked for help. I called the supervisor to take over the desk, had other nurses
    assigned to watch over her other four patients. I took one who was going down and she took the other. After about two hours things were settled, we got a DNR on one and the other family desperately wanted the mother to die at home and we got her out on an ambulance. The nurse said "yup, it sure works better that way, Thanks for all your help." I felt really good.
  10. by   pugmum
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    Just a post script. Not meant to re-start any of this controversy since it's been beat to death once already.

    I worked last Sunday and was in charge. The nurse referred to in this thread came up to me and asked to talk. She sincerely aplogized to me and told me that she appreciated me being honest enough to tell her how dangerous it was for her not to be checking on that patient and that she had gotten so upset because she was scared something would happen to the patient. I told her Thank You. I told her most important was to ask for help anytime you need it. Not 15 minutes later two of her patient began circling the drain. She asked for help. I called the supervisor to take over the desk, had other nurses
    assigned to watch over her other four patients. I took one who was going down and she took the other. After about two hours things were settled, we got a DNR on one and the other family desperately wanted the mother to die at home and we got her out on an ambulance. The nurse said "yup, it sure works better that way, Thanks for all your help." I felt really good.
    Wonderful!
  11. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from s and t
    Wonderful!

    Thanks S & T !!!!

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