Bedside report - page 2

I know there are many posts on this subject. We were just told we WILL be doing this under no uncertain terms. We have semi private rooms. We have dementia pts,confused people , psych pts, drug... Read More

  1. Visit  seanynjboy profile page
    5
    BTW...I love your "special snowflake" phrase. It cracks me up and I will be using that one in the future
    texasmum, nrsang97, WoosahRN, and 2 others like this.
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  3. Visit  motownmama27 profile page
    0
    Can't even imagine!!
  4. Visit  NicuGal profile page
    0
    We have always done this, even before it was in vogue. If there are family there and there are sensitive things we need to say we do so before we go to the bedside. You get used to it. And it does help to go over lines, etc and check IVF and expiration dates. You also get to see what IV sites look like or something else you need to see so you can make comparisons later. If you have computers in each room, you just use that do go thru the flow sheet and MAR and orders. Once you get used to it, report goes pretty fast. If there is family there with other visitors we ask if it is okay if we talk about their child in front of th.
  5. Visit  jrwest profile page
    1
    Are yiu in nicu? I believe that setting makes total sense for that type of report, and how many are you giving report on? We could be receiving report on anywhere from 5-7 pts depending on shift. Makes for a long report /
    anotherone likes this.
  6. Visit  rockstar11 profile page
    0
    Hospital wide we are expected to do bedside report. Many floors, it is enforced heavily, even requiring nurses to write their managers notes when bedside report didn't happen. On my floor? yes, it's expected, and usually happens. As an oncoming nurse, I like it, I can see my patient and assess a few things quickly as the offcoming nurse tells me. Had a couple of times where the pt was unresponsive or AOX1 and was AOx3. Also.... I've noticed that now that the hospital has been enforcing bedside report, a lot more codes get called between 0700 and 0730!

    Anyways, with all things, we use are nursing judgement. somethings just are NOT appropriate to be said at the bedside.
  7. Visit  jrwest profile page
    2
    Ok I get that some things are not appropriate at the bedside- but since we were told the whole report is to be given in the rooms, and there should be NO nurses out on the floor, when are we supposed to give those "sensitive " details? And as for time, sometimes I , when on days , might get report from 4 different nurses. Being that we are in the pt room- if the pt starts bringing up questions, complaining, etc- that report will be taking a much longer time than in the past.
    buytheshoes11 and anotherone like this.
  8. Visit  wooh profile page
    6
    Quote from Sun0408
    Call me dumb here but wouldn't bedside report in a NON private room be a big HIPAA violation??
    While it certainly violates the spirit of privacy rules, it's not actually a violation. Your roommate hearing things is merely "incidental" or some other BS that allows hospitals to get away with keeping their semi-privates.

    Quote from jrwest
    Ok I get that some things are not appropriate at the bedside- but since we were told the whole report is to be given in the rooms, and there should be NO nurses out on the floor, when are we supposed to give those "sensitive " details? And as for time, sometimes I , when on days , might get report from 4 different nurses. Being that we are in the pt room- if the pt starts bringing up questions, complaining, etc- that report will be taking a much longer time than in the past.
    THAT is the one weapon you have. Make it take longer. Once the incidental overtime starts adding up, and this idiocy costs money, only then will management rethink things.

    By the way, I have to know what special snowflake terms you were given to sugarcoat the truth enough to say it in front of the patient. Please share!!!
    nrsang97, anotherone, buytheshoes11, and 3 others like this.
  9. Visit  NicuGal profile page
    0
    We also have done it on our peds floors where we would have 4 or 5 patients. Our med surf floors do it and they have become pretty efficient at it. If you use SBAR it usually goes pretty quickly.
  10. Visit  cjcsoon2brn profile page
    0
    The Adult Med/Surg. facility I work at has done SBAR at the bedside for quite some time and for the most part it isn't that big of a deal to be honest. I give my report to the oncoming nurse in front of the patient (including Psych. patients) and if I need to say something that is really sensitive or a side note that I don't wish to say in front of the patient I will do so after we leave the room. I include Psych. patients in my previous comment because I believe that by giving the SBAR in front of the patient (instead of in the hallway outside of the room) it decreases the patient's anxiety and lets them know exactly what your saying about them in the presence of another staff member. Some Psych. patient's tend to get more agitated if they think you are talking about them to another nurse in the hallway. I also like bedside reporting because I can see IV sites, ostomies, wounds and give the patient a quick look with the nurse I am getting report from/giving report to. It has its Pros/Cons but I do think that some patients (especially if they are AAO X 3 and really paying attention to what is going on) really like to hear what is being passed on in report.

    !Chris
  11. Visit  Roseyposey profile page
    5
    I can see both sides of this argument. The big upside I can see to bedside reporting is that both nurses are laying eyes on the patients at the same time. I know that many times over the years, there was a huge disconnect between the picture painted in report and how that patient looked when I went into the room. In the PACU, we phone a report and then have to wait for an RN to come into the room to take over care on the floor. Coordinating this can be a nightmare; however, both nurses are laying eyes on the patient at the same time, which helps ensure a reliable exchange of information.

    That being said, I do not think it is always appropriate that the entire report be given in front of a patient. I think it could be embarrassing and perhaps frightening for a patient to hear that twice a day. "This is Mr. Smith, he is a 68 year old DM2, with a history of ETOH abuse, schizophrenia, hypertension, MI, etc, etc, etc. He had a left TKA yesterday and because he is on daily pain medications, he has needed x, y, z, for pain management and rates his pain at 15/10. His latest labs show a whole lot of crazy scary stuff that his doctor hasn't reviewed with him yet, and it is really freaking him out to hear me tell you. I put in a call to Dr. Important regarding his total lack of urine output, but they have not bothered to call me back. We are waiting for a social worker consult before discharge because his (insert family member) is believed to be stealing his pain meds and unable to care for him at home. Let me just keep saying a whole lot of stuff that you really need to know, but is scaring and angering Mr. Smith at the same time, blah, blah, blah." Awesome customer satisfaction scores or incomplete reporting? I guess that's our choice.
    weemsp, RNsRWe, anotherone, and 2 others like this.
  12. Visit  jrwest profile page
    2
    Quote from wooh

    By the way, I have to know what special snowflake terms you were given to sugarcoat the truth enough to say it in front of the patient. Please share!!!
    I was so "not happy " about the paper I left it in my locker, and thank God I've had two days to cool off (lol) . I will bring it home and put it on here. It was ridiculous !
    anotherone and wooh like this.
  13. Visit  jrwest profile page
    1
    Quote from wooh

    THAT is the one weapon you have. Make it take longer. Once the incidental overtime starts adding up, and this idiocy costs money, only
    One of the more "senior" nurses did bring this up. I guess we will just have to make sure we are "thorough" in our reports.
    anotherone likes this.
  14. Visit  jrwest profile page
    2
    Ok found it online- per studor :

    #9)If the patient is non-compliant, then the off-going nurse should not say “uncooperative” to the oncoming nurse. You could say “He/she was
    informed of …but the patient chose to disregard and …..” “I have
    explained that if he refuses to use the walker for assistance, the likelihood
    of a fall and injury increases.”

    Oh and I guess this "addresses" the hipaa thing lol:
    # 8) If visitors are in the room, explain that you are doing the Bedside Report
    and ask the patient if he/she wants them to step out. You should say “We
    will be talking about your condition and your progress this past shift. Since
    we want to maintain your privacy would you like your visitors to step out
    for this report?” If there are concerns about the patient being able to
    answer this honestly with visitors in the room, ask the patient during the
    shift when patient is alone.

    I mean, this all looks so good and proper on paper, but the reality is going to stink.If every nurse was cut from the same mold, maybe this would work. Well since report will take longer, I guess I will enjoy the extra money LOL
    anotherone and wooh like this.


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