Be A Lpn Or Rn?

  1. Okay I need to make a decision, I will be enrolling for next semester. This will be my first year of college, I will graduate this January so I can start to take some classes. I'm going to a local community collge. Anyway they have two majors that I'm considering. The first one is pre-nursing. Basically you take all your pre-recs and then you transfer to a university for nursing school. They also have the LPN program. I'm guess it's a two year thing, then after I pass the course, and pass the tests I will be an LPN. Anyway my question is which one should I take? I want to move out of my parents house because my mom does not want me to live here anymore. The only way I can is if I become an LPN, because the pay is better then what I'm making now. I don't have any kids, or a boyfriend, or a life for that matter. So finding the time to work and go to college will not be hard for me. I see the want ads and they need LPNs, I'm sure in 2 years they will need some as well. I plan to go to college to become a RN, while I'm working as a LPN. I feel that it will help my get through the courses if I'm a LPN, kind of like a head start. I know lots of people say they will go back to college, but I know I will. So what should I do. I have not enrolled yet and need to pick my major. My college is free, for the 2 years I will go, so money for college is not an issue at the time. Any help would be greatfull. Thank you
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   2banurse
    Hi Holly,
    If it will take you two years for the LPN, how long is it for the RN? I'm not familiar with the LPN as a major for a community college...although of course different colleges, different majors. I guess I am more familiar with the two year ADN programs at college.
    If you can get your ADN in the same time as the LPN, I would suggest the ADN as you will have a little more choice to work in some areas that require RN only.
    I plan on applying to the ADN program and if I don't get in for the fall, I plan on entering the 11 month LPN program at the technical school and then I'll just transition my way into the RN. A reason being that with a LPN, I will be able to support myself while I pursue the RN.

    Enough rambling...good luck with any of your choices!

    Kris
  4. by   Holly84
    Thanks for the reply, the list of majors just said "LPN", so I'm not sure if it is a ADN. I will look into it when I go and enroll next week
  5. by   2banurse
    Well usually the ADN is a RN program, not an LPN program.
    That's why you see a lot of the ADN vs. BSN debates on the BB. You can become an RN with either degree.

    Good luck with your decision!
  6. by   Ortho_RN
    Does it say the LPN program is 2yrs including any pre-reqs??? If you have to have the basics, English Comp, College Algrebra, Biology, Basic Anatomy etc.. Then it would probably come up to 2yrs.. 1yr for the basic classes then 1yr for the LPN training.. What do you want to do?? DO you know enough about the difference in LPN and RN?? Im not going to get into it here, cause some people get their feathers all ruffled about this, but if you want to know feel free to PM me...
  7. by   Satori
    I chose LPN, since there was a better chance of me starting the program immediately versus waiting a couple of years to get in. My school offers an LPN to RN program, which they say I'm almost guaranteed acceptance into if I get my LPN from them.

    Going this route, it'll take me three years versus two, but at least I'll get started down the path that I want to follow a bit quicker! My advice is to find out about the LPN to RN possibilities, find out how long the RN waiting list is versus the LPN waiting list, and PRAY ALOT. I know alot of people think it's dorky, but I truly believe that God will point you in the direction you ought to take if you ask him to. I was confused for a bit, but I attended a seminar, found out some info and prayed alot. I think I came to the decision that was best for me.

    GOOD LUCK!
  8. by   goddessida
    Currently I am LPN. I did this so that I could support myself and my children. Now this coming Spring I will be entering into a BSN program at a four year college. I am happy went through the LPN program, however I'm going back to school for fulfillment of myself.
    I wish you luck i anything you choose to do.
  9. by   Just Angi
    I am going for my ADN, but I'm doing it this way----1) LPN then 2)transition into the ADN just because it will be easier on me and my family this way. If you are going to get your ADN anyway, and you can afford it, it is quicker to do the ADN to start with. Just do whatever feels right for you and your situation. Just remember that you are the one who has to do it, not anyone else. Good luck on whatever you choose to do.
  10. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    The first thing you should do is talk to someone in the nursing dept in the school you plan on intending. You want to know what philosophy they stress. For instance, at my school they stressed a holistic/psychological approach to everything. I found that I disliked the complete lack of science. Even though there were 11 obligatory prerequisites of pure science courses, there was alot of psychology and it had an anti-medical tone to it.

    Look at the prerequisites for both programs. Generaly, prerequisites take about the same amount of time for both. The advantage to the ADN over the BSN is that you can go to work as an RN sooner but only by one year, assuming a full load of classes (12 credits).

    If you want to be in hospital management or you want to become an autonomous type professional at the masters level, the ADN will only hold you back. You won't be able to use a good chunk of your credits at the university level if you go through the ADN.

    Unless there is what's called an articulation agreement between the community college and the university.

    But the first thing is to find out just what you're getting yourself into.
  11. by   Bambi
    Hi,
    some colleges offer 2 tracks for ADN. Options 1: Sit for LPN boards after 1 yr. with 1 yr remaining for RN. Option 2: 2 yrs &
    sit for RN boards after graduation. Hope this is not repetitive info.
    Good luck!
  12. by   2banurse
    Originally posted by Satori
    I chose LPN, since there was a better chance of me starting the program immediately versus waiting a couple of years to get in. My school offers an LPN to RN program, which they say I'm almost guaranteed acceptance into if I get my LPN from them.

    Going this route, it'll take me three years versus two, but at least I'll get started down the path that I want to follow a bit quicker! My advice is to find out about the LPN to RN possibilities, find out how long the RN waiting list is versus the LPN waiting list, and PRAY ALOT. I know alot of people think it's dorky, but I truly believe that God will point you in the direction you ought to take if you ask him to. I was confused for a bit, but I attended a seminar, found out some info and prayed alot. I think I came to the decision that was best for me.

    GOOD LUCK!
    Hi Satori, I'm pretty much following in your footsteps. I've been going back and forth between going directly into the ADN program (I just received the application today) or going into the LPN at the vocational school that starts next fall as well. After getting my LPN, the schools also have an agreement for the LPN to RN transitional course. What I like about the LPN is that it is a pretty intensive 11 months with about 700 clinical hours vs. the approximate 400 clinical hours for the first year of the ADN.

    As I am writing this, I seem to be convincing myself more and more to go this LPN - RN route. Plus as I am pretty much get some actual work experience before I start the transitional program...being self-supporting, I can start paying my student loans...yeech!
  13. by   Tweety
    Here in Florida (or at least my hospital) the LPN does the same work an RN does for about $5.00-$8.00/hr less. The only difference is they don't do charge.

    I usually encourage those who are able to go the RN route. There is so much responsibility in being an LPN and so little pay.

    But it depends on where you want to work. If you go the LPN route, I encourage quickly going into the RN program while you got the chance.

    Just my two cents.

    Good luck!!!
  14. by   Teshiee
    It really depends on you. Sounds like you answered your own question. Being a LVN first isn't a bad choice in fact I find that being a LVN first allowed me to breeze through the RN program because some of the material was like review. Some schools have LVN for 1 year or up to 3 semesters. Then when you finish you may take a bridge course for the RN program providing you have your prereqs and adn classes completed. It does vary from school to school. You will find lots of RNs were LVN'S first. Go for it. No matter what road you take it is a step up from what you are doing now! :-) good luck, :-)

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