As a BSN student in clinicals it seems like many floor nurses are "mean spirited". - page 2

Here are a few examples that I've experienced or witnessed during my time in clinicals: 1. It is common that I or one of my fellow students will ask a qustion, or simply say hello, good morning... Read More

  1. by   VivaLasViejas
    I'm so sorry you're having trouble.......jnette said it best. I agree that we should be embracing students, not pushing them aside as if they were in the way. I wish you could do your clinicals at my hospital, I love having students........maybe because I've never forgotten what it felt like to be new and scared to pieces!

    I wish you better luck as you progress through your clinicals. Don't let the few bad ones discourage you......you sound like a very caring nurse-in-the-making, and if I were a patient I'd rather be under your care than theirs.
  2. by   Jailhouse RN
    Pay attention, learn and you will know all the things NOT to do after you become a nurse. I like students. I have learned from some and helped a few. We were all students (RN/LPN) and we needed a place to learn and grow. I have had both good and bad like everybody else here. I can say I have some real memories of some special staff people who helped me along the way. Like Sister Mary Mora RN who used to steal me away to let me do neat things like give injections and see interesting things. You will meet people like this too. Don't give up, we all don't bite (just jail house nurses!).
    Last edit by Jailhouse RN on Apr 12, '04
  3. by   jaimealmostRN
    Don't let these people get you down! I think this specific CNA may have some jealousy issues if she was that nasty towards you...I'd shrug that one off. This semester our group has been on 2 different tele units in the same hospital...the 1st: CNA=nice, RN=very mean!, the 2nd: RN=VERY VERY nice, CNA=mean,manipulative. Last week, my patient went into severe respiratory distress in a matter of seconds (mild distress all day, primary rn aware). The RT let me hold the bag-valve mask, suction the ET tube after it was inserted and let me put in an NGT under the supervision of my intructor...what a day! All this time the awesome RT didn't express any frustrations with me if I fumbled and it took 2 tries to get that NGT in! At the end of the day, the primary RN gave me a high five and said good work :hatparty: YOu can imagine how happy I was. And when the mean cna stated loudly that I "took the thermometer right out of my hands" (not true), I turned and gave her a smirk (not very mature, but you know...). My point is, concentrate on your victories. And as the notorious Dr. Phil says "own that" bedbath! Follow you books intructions and then add you own touches (i.e. lotsa extra warmed blankets for that always cold person, a full assessment during as tolerated, even that elusive backmassage that the busy nurses and techs don't have the time to do. Take advantage of that 1:1 b/c after school, it'll never happen again!
  4. by   zenman
    I've always enjoyed having nursing students. I do think that sometimes you might "turn the other cheek" and let the mean nurse or staff slide. But...if you consider that you are providing free therapy to them and helping them become a better person (and therefore a better nurse), either confront them directly about their behavior or write them up till they catch on. We have a floor that CNAs do not want to work on nor agency staff want to visit. So...when the floor calls about their lack of staff, you can imagine what my therapeutic response is. You can't call someone an a**hole, but you can tell them that their behavior is consistent with that of an a**hole!
  5. by   Love767
    I wanted to clarify a couple of points:

    a. I didn't seek to have the CNA written up. However, since she said what she did in front of my instructor and others it happened anyway (I'm not sure who instigated the "write up", but it wasn't me).

    b. I am known for having a strong "spine" with my family and friends. However, I have almost completely repressed this as a nursing student for several reasons. First, as a student I realize that they probably know more than me in almost all areas. Second, I was raised to "respect my elders" even when they were wrong or abusive (to a point). Third, I don't want to say anything that could be taken as insubordination, better my feelings be hurt than my future. However, I felt that in this case the nurse wasn't satisfied with hurting my feelings she wanted to accomplish something more.

    Thanks, for all the support. In the end I realize that the advice of Jesus to love your enemies is the best. Thanks for the support. Any advice for handling similar situations in a non-confrontational (but effective) manner would be appreciated.
  6. by   nekhismom
    My first semsester of med/surg was like that. Just ignore it the best that you can, and DON'T take it personal. Went to a completely different hospital for m/s 2 and it was GREAT! It just depends. I just kept smiling and talking to people and didn't let them shake me

    Best of luck
  7. by   mattsmom81
    I think we can all remember 'someone' who was nasty to us when we were young and tender. I still remember some of these incidents vividly. We all eventually find 'that line' which we can't allow another to cross before we must defend ourselves in some way. Unfortunately, when this nasty behavior is part of the culture of the place, sometimes all we can do is get out. So...if its just one bully consider shutting them down if you can, but if the ugliness is ingrained in a unit or facility, better reconsider whether you want to stay there. These type places will do harm to your soul. I just left a place like this...where even the nice folks there were becoming passive aggressive (if not outright nasty) in response to the atmosphere...it was so draining to me to go in there everyday I finally had to resign.

    Hugs to all students....find the nice folks and hang with them. We're out there. probably with a few bruises of our own.
  8. by   JMP
    Yes, sometimes you need to get out and change your surroundings. I have done this and not regretted it.

    Often for those who stay in a toxic enviroment, they become part of it, only way to survive. Often people don't even realize they are now a part of the problem and the solution becomes even harder to realize.

    Solutions need to come from above, strong managers who provide leadership to foster and support a morally strong enviroment. Participatory management styles will allow nurses to be part of decisions in the unit, less oppressive enviroment......leading to nurses practicing to their full potential.

    However, it is difficult for an individual nurse to change a toxic enviroment..... leads to burnout and moral distress...... JMP
  9. by   orrnlori
    Hard as I might, I just can't quite agree with this horizontal violence and oppression theory that is being taught. To me it just excuses the actions of people who are basically unable to be decent to others. We can analyze human behavior accross the spectrum, it still does not justify this behavior. I've found that nurses who are ugly on a day to day basis are just plain ugly people in all their dealings in life (that's a southern expression, I don't mean they are physically ugly, they are ugly in their hearts). These people many times have broken lives, broken relationships, unhappy children, etc. etc. etc., just listen to them talk about their lives and you'll hear it. I've yet to meet the nasty nurse that is kind in other areas of her life. Nursing may bring this out in them, I don't know. I think some people become nurses because they think it will give them power. When it doesn't they turn it outward toward every living thing. Maybe I will study it someday in depth. But I really hate to see the word oppression used in nursing. It so belittles what true oppression is in this world.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from orrnlori
    Hard as I might, I just can't quite agree with this horizontal violence and oppression theory that is being taught. To me it just excuses the actions of people who are basically unable to be decent to others. We can analyze human behavior accross the spectrum, it still does not justify this behavior. I've found that nurses who are ugly on a day to day basis are just plain ugly people in all their dealings in life (that's a southern expression, I don't mean they are physically ugly, they are ugly in their hearts). These people many times have broken lives, broken relationships, unhappy children, etc. etc. etc., just listen to them talk about their lives and you'll hear it. I've yet to meet the nasty nurse that is kind in other areas of her life. Nursing may bring this out in them, I don't know. I think some people become nurses because they think it will give them power. When it doesn't they turn it outward toward every living thing. Maybe I will study it someday in depth. But I really hate to see the word oppression used in nursing. It so belittles what true oppression is in this world.

    Oh, wise, wise words. We teach others how to treat us and believe me, no one "oppresses" me. I learned early-on to grow a thick skin and defend my right to be treated decently, even by doctors with the attitude from hell. We are not defenseless and oppressed in my viewpoint. As a group, we DO like to whine a lot, however and that puts in a bad position. We then can do very little for ourselves if we persist in the view we are "oppressed". I don't buy it either.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Apr 13, '04
  11. by   deathnurse
    This is an outstanding example of the reasons that no one should become a nurse and work with other women.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    (or men)


    I don't know what burns me more, the nurses that treat students like crap, or the student nurses who act like i'm their personal assistant (and treat me with a mannerism that i'm less than human).
  13. by   Love767
    Maybe the student nurses that treat you as their "personal assistants" are the same ones who end up treating future student nurses "like crap".

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