Anyone Else Experience Mobbing? - page 8

Hi~ I have been at my new job for over a year now and have become the victim of mobbing by my peers in the ICU where I work. I have tried every approach with this but nothing has helped my... Read More

  1. by   Ms Kylee
    Oh yeah... I've seen one nurse go after all of those who were not BSN's (she thinks those without a BSN are "beneath" her.) Her favorite targets seem to be the NA's though. She pulled crap on me twice. I let her get away with it once before I put her in her place. Fortunately, I don't have to work with her that often.
  2. by   Nurse_RaRa
    Hi weak,

    I agree with the others - just find a better place. Easier said than done if you have a family or ties to the area. I moved and I love the new place/hospital. All the staff are not like that at all. I know you wrote first in February but all of need to see this learn how to never let it happen in OUR corner of the world. thanks for writing.

    PS. all my fellow nursing students promised ourselves to never propagate the "Nurses eat their young" idea. We all were new and inexperienced once. Being encouraging and supportive of new grads/new people is the only way to make you and your employer very happy.
  3. by   bmh-lpn
    I have seen this in Nursing as well as in other jobs and professions. I have experienced before. Best to get out.
    boneta
  4. by   Nurseynurseyme
    Quote from teeituptom
    Consider selective hearing then. I only hear what I want. Like when all 7 of my children wanted money or cars or whatever. I didnt hear a thing. Works wondrously.


    But by failing to empower the alledged mobsters. In other words you dont give them the opportunity to mobber you. You dont give them an opening to attack you.

    At work, I dont talk about beliefs, I dont talk about coworkers, I dont talk about anything, well maybe I do talk about Golf. I go to work. I turn a deaf ear to gossip and hearsay. Thus I dont open myself to mobbery<Yes I know thats not a word> Thats my humour.

    I work, I go to the club, I go home. Then I go golfing, life is simple. Kind of reminds me of GWB, very simple.
    I'm afraid your advice to ignore it and it will go away does not work.

    I was mobbed as a new nurse and I didn't know what was going on. This represents a change in career to me and I was pretty focused upon not making a mistake and in my own world. I figured out later that my supervisor and two preceptors conspired to rout me.

    I had no idea what was going on, so I couldn't be said to be trying to fight it. Still, the Dept head let me go but wouldn't show me any of her supposed evidence, she just made vague comments. I was just blindsided; there was one preceptor who had submitted preceptor reports that said I was doing great, but they did not evidently support the agenda and so were disregarded.

    So, in my case, ignoring it did not make it go away. I did not fight back.

    Now, looking back, I would document incidents I had witnessed and amass my own evidence until I could transfer away from that poisonous unit.

    Since then, that Department head was asked to resign and is gone, but I work at another facility where I am supported and told what a great job I'm doing.

    I think refusing to participate might work in minor skirmishes, but if it's a major concerted effort, you must take steps to defend yourself, and you must get away from that environment as soon as humanly possible for your own good.
  5. by   Nurseynurseyme
    Quote from Nurse_RaRa
    Hi weak,

    I agree with the others - just find a better place. Easier said than done if you have a family or ties to the area. I moved and I love the new place/hospital. All the staff are not like that at all. I know you wrote first in February but all of need to see this learn how to never let it happen in OUR corner of the world. thanks for writing.

    PS. all my fellow nursing students promised ourselves to never propagate the "Nurses eat their young" idea. We all were new and inexperienced once. Being encouraging and supportive of new grads/new people is the only way to make you and your employer very happy.
    I think it's a good idea for nursing students to talk about this issue and to make a pact to be kind to novice nurses and support those who will be paying for your social security when you retire (grin) BUT sometimes units are so highly politicized that people you went to school with are not brave enough to stand up and defend you.

    Nurses from my class, in an effort to not trust the wrong nurse with their questions and insecurity, have decided to ask the bulk of their questions to each other, rather than an existing floor nurse. This way they are assured that it won't be gossiped about that they don't know what they are doing or things of that nature.

    There are grads from our class all over that facility in all shifts. So they keep their insecurities "in the family".

    I think that is a good tactic! Thought I'd spread it around...
  6. by   linzz
    I do wish for the day that mobbing ends, esp. to new nurses. I think it just makes those that do it look very unprofessional and from a patient's point of view, I doubt that mobbing helps raise the SOC muc.
  7. by   Nurseynurseyme
    Quote from Medic04
    You know that is the sad thing, management KNOWS it goes on 9/10 times and does NOTHING! They know it is one person where I am at, continues to mob the new folks or even a few older ones and you watch and see it happen again and again and again. But management is"What do you want me to do?"
    FIRE THAT PERSON! Do your JOB.:angryfire
    I have a friend who graduated RN school with me and she was routed out of a department as a new grad. She just took it, but was back in the facility some time later to pick up her check and she ran into the CEO of the facility--who was a personal friend. This is a small town.

    The CEO asked her how she was and commented she hadn't been seen around in a while, and she volunteered that she had been let go.

    They had a meeting in which she was told "Have you heard that nurses eat their young?" So, yes they know about it and I guess it's a given, and they don't do anything about it.

    She wound up getting rehired on another floor and is getting support there. My whole point is that yes they know and yes they often accept it as a fact of life and do nothing to stop it.

    Very very sad.
  8. by   Nurseynurseyme
    Quote from WeakAnkles
    I think this is the first step towards change with this.

    However, I also think this is what started turning "the mob" against me to begin with.

    I didn't join the mob at the beginning of my employment there while they were ganging up on someone else at the time. Gracious no, I even tried to point out their untruths against the poor soul. Call me naive, foolish, or idealistic. I just still can't stop trying to hang onto my integrity in these toxic swamps though. And yes, that person quit 6 months later anyhow.

    I am in my 40's and have lots of ICU experience. I am simply put, a good and respected nurse by the Docs. Ironically, I think this also contributed against me here.

    Anyhow, I am an "at will" employee. Also, I don't think the United States has any laws yet against mobbing, like they do in some European Countries. Are there really any legal avenues for me to pursue here?

    "Quitting" seems like I'm empowering them to continue to do this to others. I really think we need to find solutions for this problem collectively.

    I'm sure countless others have been on the receiving end of this particular form of workplace abuse. I wish them all a speedy recovery.

    Again thanks to all who responded so far. I found myself shedding healing tears while reading some posts.

    It's sad to think my only recourse is to run from it. But this sad truth has become self evident already.
    There is something called hostile work environment. Read up on your state's labor laws. If it is happening to you then it may fall under harassment and there ARE laws against that.
  9. by   Nurseynurseyme
    Quote from TiredMD
    I'm not a nurse, but in medicine we "mob" each other regularly, mainly medical students and residents. It's our culture. The most severe instances are usually because of a general feeling that the person is incompetent, and patients would be better off if the person would quit. I had assumed that this was the same in nursing?
    I think that may be true, however who's to say that one's personal opinion should be the arbiter of this person's career/education? Why not encourage this person and try to help them? If they are unsafe, then it will be come evident and steps can be taken that won't be mean spirited.

    For myself, I am competent and honorable. I personally think that the reason it happened to me was because the perpetrators felt challenged by me and my questions and I was not sufficiently cowed by them, so they went underground and poisoned the well.

    I refused to accept that mistakes are ok, and I said my goal was to avoid them; one preceptor in particular was very offended by that.
  10. by   rph3664
    If you people think this is unique to nursing, you're mistaken. I have seen, and experienced it, in jobs I had before I became a pharmacist.

    And twice, I have been fired from pharmacy jobs due to falsified disciplinary reports. Everyone's response was, "Prove you didn't do this and we will expunge it from your record." The people who falsified my files have done this to other people, and I'm pretty sure one of them tried to blackball me. Yeah, yeah, I know employers are only supposed to say that you worked there, but who knows what else she told them?

    This was in a city of 300,000 and I solved the problem by moving - something I DID NOT want to do because I loved living there otherwise. I have met students who had already heard that this city was a very difficult place to work as a pharmacist, and had classmates who grew up there but weren't going to move back for this reason.

    How do people like this sleep at night?
  11. by   pooh54
    So sorry this has happened to you. Hugs to u. I've personally experienced this and am currently watching this happen to a colleague of mine,I've spoken up to no avail.... the nurse must also take up her own cause or leave. Unfortunately leaving also allows the behavior to continue, but taking on the whole organization can be very intimidating.My current nurse manager is utilizing HR to perpetrate this unfair behavior . Best of luck to you in whatever decision you make, I waited so long that I was dx'ed with PTSD.
    Last edit by pooh54 on Nov 19, '07 : Reason: forgot to add items
  12. by   rph3664
    Quote from pooh54
    So sorry this has happened to you. Hugs to u. I've personally experienced this and am currently watching this happen to a colleague of mine,I've spoken up to no avail.... the nurse must also take up her own cause or leave. Unfortunately leaving also allows the behavior to continue, but taking on the whole organization can be very intimidating.My current nurse manager is utilizing HR to perpetrate this unfair behavior . Best of luck to you in whatever decision you make, I waited so long that I was dx'ed with PTSD.
    Thanks for the kind words; it happened years ago and I have gotten over it.

    I, too developed PTSD from the "blackball" job and had daily migraines for months afterwards. They were not serious; I could still function but they were quite annoying.

    When I had my pre-employment physical at the job where I have worked for 4 years with exemplary reviews, I told the employee health nurse about the PTSD and she looked at me like I had an extra head and asked me, "What could a pharmacist possibly experience on the job that would lead to PTSD?" :trout: I explained why, and she seemed to understand at that point, but that happened to be her last day and I later heard that she had that kind of attitude towards people and that was why she was kind of asked to leave.
  13. by   Chaya
    Quote from bmh-lpn
    I have seen this in Nursing as well as in other jobs and professions. I have experienced before. Best to get out.
    boneta
    Thing is, there's no guarantee the new place won't be as bad as or worse than the first. Then where are you? I'm not sure it's possible for one lone employee to change their work atmosphere alone but I need to believe that a nucleus of committed people who can no longer stand by and watch this crap go on, can change it. Or else this could be the work environment that will exist everywhere!

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