Allowing more than RN on name badge? - page 4

does your facility allow you to have designations other than rn on your name badge (such as rn, bsn/ rn, ccrn etc.)? our hospital does not allow this and it is a thorn in the side of some of the rn's... Read More

  1. by   DarlinNurseRed
    LOL...I don't need a reason, really. I was only being sarcastic saying "wary".... But isn't it really a bit humorous to see a name tag for example:
    Jane Doe, RN,ABC,DE,FGH,IJKL,MNOP,QRSTUV,W,XYZ
  2. by   Logan
    Hi,

    I'm all for allowing nurses to put up their degree of choice on their tags.
    Every body doesn't have to do it - and those who want, should be allowed to do it.

    For practical purposes, we could limit it to one/two degrees. You get to pick which ones.

    It's none of anybody's "business" what your "degree" is/was. For official purposes, you have your designation "RN"... and that's good enough for a judge/jury!



    Thanks,
    Matthew
  3. by   DarlinNurseRed
    I think the RN that moongirl described with the initials on her left boob is a most hilarious, but, very TRUE description. I have seen that myself...lol
  4. by   steelydanfan
    I think RN is sufficient for those who have an entrance level degree (be it ADN, DSN or BSN), but if someone takes the time and care to achieve a higher degree or national certification, why not alow them to put it on thier badge?
    All it can do is stimulate questions; perhaps spur colleagues into attaining more education, and helping our patients to realize that nursing is a VERY educated and specialized profession.
  5. by   drumwhacker
    Here's one for you guys to ponder: I worked as a cd/psych counselor for about 7 years after I finished my M.A. in Counseling in 1990. I always signed "MA" after my name during that period since the degree was a requisite for the job. Now I've finished my ADN, passed the Nclex, and am working as a psych nurse/group therapy facilitator in an inpatient setting. I'll actually have the opportunity to utilize my previous experience and develop my psych nursing skills. What would you guys put on your name badges if in my position and given a choice?

    Just a thought..... and I'm honestly grateful to finally be an RN!

    Thanks a bunch
  6. by   steelydanfan
    Quote from drumwhacker
    Here's one for you guys to ponder: I worked as a cd/psych counselor for about 7 years after I finished my M.A. in Counseling in 1990. I always signed "MA" after my name during that period since the degree was a requisite for the job. Now I've finished my ADN, passed the Nclex, and am working as a psych nurse/group therapy facilitator in an inpatient setting. I'll actually have the opportunity to utilize my previous experience and develop my psych nursing skills. What would you guys put on your name badges if in my position and given a choice?

    Just a thought..... and I'm honestly grateful to finally be an RN!

    Thanks a bunch
    I'd use the M.A. designation, since it is a requisite for counseling, which is clearly part of your current job description.
  7. by   neetnik461
    With your previous background you are going to be an awesome psych nurse! In my opinion name badge should read:

    drumwhacker, RN :spin: (sorry, couldn't resist)

    Seriously, if I where you, my name badge would say the same thing it does now firstname, lastname, RN.

    Just my 2 cents . . .
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from neetnik461
    With your previous background you are going to be an awesome psych nurse! In my opinion name badge should read:

    drumwhacker, RN :spin: (sorry, couldn't resist)

    Seriously, if I where you, my name badge would say the same thing it does now firstname, lastname, RN.

    Just my 2 cents . . .
    . . . . and then there is the "first name/last name" debate . . .

    No last name on my name badge.

    Back to the subject at hand. I guess we should each do what we want.

    steph
  9. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from KellieNurse06
    I have a nurse in my home who does home care..she is a BSN & I only know after asking her......she said she doesn't see the point of advertising it because she is an RN first & foremost...........I used to waitress and actually had a lady sign her credit card receipt with RN MSN...................I kindly told her that wasn't legal on her credit card slip as it doesn't have RN MSN after her name on the card..................knocked her right off her pedestal
    I doubt it had anything to do with pedestal - you sign your name that way so many times in a day that it jsut becomes habit. I have signed checks and written "RN" after the signature!
  10. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Tsk, tsk. I long to see the day when nurses can be proud of their educational acheivements without being accused of being "on a power trip" or "snobby". If someone wants to wear their credentials, whatever they may be I say go for it. In fact the sooner we value our education and our achievements, the sooner others will do so. It's no wonder many people think nurses are undereducated handmaidens.
    My facility allows it.
    SharonH, MSN RN
    :yeahthat:

    For fun, I asked a few of my friends how long a person had to go school to become a nurse - "a year or two" was the answer I got - they don't understand all the different degrees and designations. Most of them don't even really understand the RN and LPN designation. When I went to NP school they were completely confused!

    We should all be proud of the education and credentials we have earned, whatever those are - I was darn proud of my AS when I earned that!

    The name tags should say in large easily to read letters "RN" and then the credentials should be on there underneath as well. Maybe it doesnt matter so much to patients, but it should matter to US and to our peers. No power trip involved, but I personally am very proud of my peers who have invested the time and energy to get certified or obtain more education!
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from gauge14iv
    I doubt it had anything to do with pedestal - you sign your name that way so many times in a day that it jsut becomes habit. I have signed checks and written "RN" after the signature!
    Me too.


    steph
  12. by   madwife2002
    Quote from gauge14iv
    :yeahthat:

    For fun, I asked a few of my friends how long a person had to go school to become a nurse - "a year or two" was the answer I got - they don't understand all the different degrees and designations. Most of them don't even really understand the RN and LPN designation. When I went to NP school they were completely confused!

    We should all be proud of the education and credentials we have earned, whatever those are - I was darn proud of my AS when I earned that!

    The name tags should say in large easily to read letters "RN" and then the credentials should be on there underneath as well. Maybe it doesnt matter so much to patients, but it should matter to US and to our peers. No power trip involved, but I personally am very proud of my peers who have invested the time and energy to get certified or obtain more education!
    Do you know I am an RN from the UK and I find it difficult to understand because in the UK you have to go to university for a minimum 3 years for a diploma/degree in nursing and sometimes 4 years for the degree.
  13. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from madwife2002
    Do you know I am an RN from the UK and I find it difficult to understand because in the UK you have to go to university for a minimum 3 years for a diploma/degree in nursing and sometimes 4 years for the degree.
    Madwife - its pretty similar here - an AD or AS degree in nursing is a 2 year degree required to obtain an RN, but by the time you take all the basic courses, apply and get in to the nursing track it usually takes most folks about 3 years. It is an additional year of pre-requisite courses and an additional year of nursing courses for a BS.

    An LPN (LVN in some states) is a 1 year program with very few pre-requisite courses.

    Now throw in direct entry nursing programs, diploma programs and the multiple tracks encompassed within even the same schools and no wonder the public is confused!

    I had the pleasure of explaining to a group of high school kids not too long ago what they had to do to get into nursing - the greatest number of questions were about all the confusion in the kinds of nurses and degrees.

    Somethin's gotta give...
    Last edit by gauge14iv on Aug 20, '06

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