All Hail Started paperless today!

  1. So, today after much anticipation our facility took the first step into becoming paperless. What a crazy day! It's a psych hospital so go figure. The program we are using is not very user friendly though I know I'll get the hang of it eventually. Still I have heard that some of the older nurses who are not very computer savvy may be let go if they don't catch on quickly.

    So sad but I guess we can't stand in the way of progress.

    Hppy
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   raindrops1234
    I hope they wouldn't let them go! Are they offering any extra training for those who may not be familiar with basic computer functions or anything?

    I feel bad because I was just complaining about not being electronic...
  4. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from raindrops1234
    I hope they wouldn't let them go! Are they offering any extra training for those who may not be familiar with basic computer functions or anything?

    I feel bad because I was just complaining about not being electronic...
    Well they did do a rather comprehensive training for the RN's and Med nurses. Plus the training room is open all the time for people to step in an practice on their own time of course. We have a few older nurse who have been with hospital many years and managements philosophy at this point is learn it with a specified time frame, or give notice.

    There is actually a lot of help available for people who want to learn - and when I had to do a discharge - with the patients/guardians doing electronic signatures and every thing it got kind of intense - but I know there a few nurses who will have tremendous difficulty making this transition. They are mostly super nice people but frozen in fear at the site of a keyboard and monitor.

    Hppy
  5. by   iluvivt
    I believe you but find it odd. Nurses are used to used to having to constantly learn new things so how is this different. Just dive in is my attitude but I do admit I love to learn.
  6. by   roser13
    Quote from iluvivt
    I believe you but find it odd. Nurses are used to used to having to constantly learn new things so how is this different. Just dive in is my attitude but I do admit I love to learn.
    Our transition to EMR prompted the early retirement of not only older nurses, but a few MD's as well.
  7. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from iluvivt
    I believe you but find it odd. Nurses are used to used to having to constantly learn new things so how is this different. Just dive in is my attitude but I do admit I love to learn.
    That's exactly what I said to one of my co-workers who continues to state reluctance to get started "It's like jumping into a cold pool, just jump right in and start swimming."

    Hppy
  8. by   Here.I.Stand
    Just curious, how old are these frozen-in-fear-at-the-computer nurses? Maybe because my dad (67 yrs old) has always been a techie that I'm picturing frail 90 yr olds; my dad actually built our first home computer when I was in...1st grade I think? But when I read about these "older" nurses having so much trouble, I think of in "Hidden Figures," where the term "computer" referred to the people who did the calculations. Then as the story progresses, Octavia Johnson's character in trying to stay ahead of the time, gets into programming the actual IBM computers.

    We aren't living in a time of technology being that completely new. Do they use email -- even just employee email? Shop online? Navigate without the use of paper maps or the stars? If so, I wouldn't think an EHR would be such a roadblock.

    That's not to say that their *perception* doesn't tell them it's difficult. I like your swimming analogy. I hail from rural Wisconsin, and as a kid took swimming lessons on a lake in June. I remember once when I was 12, seeing the other kids' teeth chattering and lips turning blue. After getting home, out of curiosity I checked my temp -- it was around 95°. The water was cold! Getting back to your point, had we been at the lake with our family and tiptoed into the water, it was NOT going to happen. Each step out from the shore would expose more skin to the cold water. However our instructor had us duck under the water first thing. Initially it was very uncomfortable, but then it was tolerable -- at least until hypothermia started setting in.

    A new EHR can be intimidating, BUT if they have the cognitive ability to practice nursing (which as another poster also said, has changed in recent decades in MANY ways other than computers), they have the cognitive ability to learn an EHR. They need to purge that thought that tells them their age is a barrier, and jump into that water.
  9. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from Here.I.Stand
    Just curious, how old are these frozen-in-fear-at-the-computer nurses? Maybe because my dad (67 yrs old) has always been a techie that I'm picturing frail 90 yr olds; my dad actually built our first home computer when I was in...1st grade I think? But when I read about these "older" nurses having so much trouble, I think of in "Hidden Figures," where the term "computer" referred to the people who did the calculations. Then as the story progresses, Octavia Johnson's character in trying to stay ahead of the time, gets into programming the actual IBM computers.

    We aren't living in a time of technology being that completely new. Do they use email -- even just employee email? Shop online? Navigate without the use of paper maps or the stars? If so, I wouldn't think an EHR would be such a roadblock.

    That's not to say that their *perception* doesn't tell them it's difficult. I like your swimming analogy. I hail from rural Wisconsin, and as a kid took swimming lessons on a lake in June. I remember once when I was 12, seeing the other kids' teeth chattering and lips turning blue. After getting home, out of curiosity I checked my temp -- it was around 95°. The water was cold! Getting back to your point, had we been at the lake with our family and tiptoed into the water, it was NOT going to happen. Each step out from the shore would expose more skin to the cold water. However our instructor had us duck under the water first thing. Initially it was very uncomfortable, but then it was tolerable -- at least until hypothermia started setting in.

    A new EHR can be intimidating, BUT if they have the cognitive ability to practice nursing (which as another poster also said, has changed in recent decades in MANY ways other than computers), they have the cognitive ability to learn an EHR. They need to purge that thought that tells them their age is a barrier, and jump into that water.
    The average age of our nurses who are having trouble with this transition is between 55-65. Not all that old by today's standards. I myself am 54 and like your mentioned - my dad loved the idea of new technology. He didn't build computers, but he couldn't wait to have one and purchased the Texas Instruments TRS80 when they became available.

    The facility where I work is almost 100 years old and sometimes I swear there are nurses who have been there since the opening. They resist change at every turn. I made the same analogy you did about uses of e-commerce, E-mail, text messaging etc...... I really don't believe it's due to a lack of intelligence or ability but more they are digging in their heels. I even heard one say "We've always done paper charting why change now."

    The federal mandate for facilities to go paperless was actually 2014 but was extended for long term care facilities and certain other entities such as free standing psych facilities. Now the time has come with no more delays granted and some of our nurses who felt it would never happen are panicking. I have continuously offered help to anyone in my section to learn the skills necessary even though I am still learning the program myself. One nurse who had been off for a few days before yesterday's start dated told me how frightened she was of the switch- over. I told her "You are a bright intelligent woman and you'll do fine." Change is difficult but something we have to embrace.

    The funny thing is that once I started doing my daily charting, I was able to complete everything quite quickly. This may be because I can type much faster than I can write by hand. I honestly don't want anyone to lose their jobs over this but it looks like it might be inevitable at this point.

    Hppy

close