aggressive behavior - page 2

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  1. by   monkijr
    I work in a LTC facility, and the aggression is not necessarily dementia related.

    I am having a difficult time convincing the staff that the color thing is a bit odd, and how it is a dignity issue, They just don't get it!!!!

    Assessments are in place, care plans are in place, interventions taught, what they are looking for is a way to avoid in my opinion that which sometimes cannot be predicted or unavoided, unless you have one on one with each resident.

    It's not going to be easy, but my goal is to avoid "branding/labeling" but I need to suggest another solution.

    any thoughts?
  2. by   jemb
    Where I work, any employee can write a complaint about an aggresive patient. If the organization receives complaints about three different incidents, the client's coverage is discontinued.

    No one should have to put up with abuse in the name of customer service.
  3. by   monkijr
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by sunnygirl272
    /hipppppaaaa[size=1](can never remember if it's 2 p's or 2 a's...

    <quote by me.....

    the argument that it is a hippa (hee hee I can't even get it right) issue

    It's HIPAA Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act And I have to look it up most the time.

    Don't know if I'll ever get it correct, since I heard it referred to hippo, forever.
  4. by   Sleepyeyes
    We use color-coded bracelets at our facility, but not for aggressive pts.

    We generally use them for elopement precautions or fall precautions.

    For example, orange is for elopement precautions, red is for allergies, blue is thickened liquids, etc. You might try something like that, like neon yellow to mean "approach cautiously" or something.

    And just like with someone on restraints, this would have to be something that was frequently and regularly re-evaluated for appropriateness.

    I don't believe this causes any harm to a person's dignity; it may very well be for a short-term period and the pt. is more protected by staff who are aware that the pt is in DT's or whatever.
    Last edit by Sleepyeyes on Mar 19, '03
  5. by   monkijr
    I will certainly suggest this an option, still am looking for *other* options, however, still don't know what they might be.

    Maybe I am not being realistic?, can always think outside the box.
  6. by   night owl
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER
    LOVING it!

    I guess I didn't realize how much I enjoyed the psych aspect until I was admitting my first paranoid schizophrenic, and I got that thrilling/excited/adrenaline-pumping feeling when he kept "SHHH!"-ing the voices. :chuckle

    Thanks for asking!
    Heather,
    You work on a psych unit now???
  7. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by night owl
    Heather,
    You work on a psych unit now???
    Dual Diagnosis... Psych/Chemical Dependency.
  8. by   Nurse Ratched
    Originally posted by night owl
    Heather,
    You work on a psych unit now???
    Too cool, huh? You know she must ROCK at it . No wusses in psych .
  9. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by Nurse Ratched
    Too cool, huh? You know she must ROCK at it . No wusses in psych .
    Awwwww..... how sweet!

    I do feel right at home.
  10. by   passing thru
    I am just getting to this thread as I have been consumed with IRS and receipts and baskets full of "little pieces of paper", (deductions), but I would like to say I enjoyed 272'S definition of elopement immensely.
  11. by   passing thru
    Is the "system" to protect the staff or the residents??

    According to your examples; wouldn't you initially be alerted by the examining docs' diagnosis??

    Wouldn't the patients/clients/residents/ give you clues? A lot of people who are not professionally trained can pick up on verbal and body language cues that signal another person's
    explosive "potential."
    Few people don't give cues prior to actual striking. Hostility, the patient feeling trapped, the patient feeling manipulated, verbal warnings and threats, etc, will all result in aggression.. same as you or I would exhibit.
    Listen and look, you don't need a "system" or color coded shirt to avoid
    an unexpected outburst/attack.
  12. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by passing thru
    Few people don't give cues prior to actual striking. Hostility, the patient feeling trapped, the patient feeling manipulated, verbal warnings and threats, etc, will all result in aggression.. same as you or I would exhibit.
    Listen and look, you don't need a "system" or color coded shirt to avoid
    an unexpected outburst/attack.
    Excellent post! I will, however, disagree that there are no cues. There are usually distinct signs of escalation. But perhaps those not used to that type of behavior don't pick up on them as well?

    Before my first job in an inpatient rehab, I had to take a 2 day seminar on escalating behaviors and self defense. I'll actually be retraining soon.

    Heather
  13. by   night owl
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER
    Dual Diagnosis... Psych/Chemical Dependency.
    WOW, you've got guts girl!...psycho drug addicts...You be careful out there. Some have no warning signs. As I learned the hard way...Was speaking to a paranoid schiz, kept my distance, one foot in front of the other, but since I only have a size 5.5-6 shoe size, and he was very tall with very long arms, no signs at all of aggression {{WHAM}} punched right in the eye...ouch!!!!!!!!!!! Felt like my eye went out the back of my head. Only received a corneal abraison, but it still hurt like H*LL! I'll Never forget it.

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