Afraid to quit my job

  1. I have been working as an RCM in long term care for 5 months. I have been provided education on how to do MDS and state regs. I know this cost the company money to train me. I have done a good job, but was not trained on all aspects of the position and have had to figure out most of it myself. I told my employer I would stay a year, but am not able to. I work long hours uncompensated and people keep asking me "why haven't you done (fill in the blank)". I have never been told I was responsible for those duties nor shown how to do it. My husband is fed up with me coming home late and falling asleep before 8pm. The unit I work on has had 4 managers over the last couple of years and I was trained by an MDS consultant who did not know all the aspects of the position. Hence I started out behind and would have to work 12 hour days every day in order to catch up. I have improved the quality of care and get along great with my coworkers so I feel like I am letting them down.

    My problem is I feel bad for putting them in a bind. I only plan to give 2 weeks notice although the company request a month. It is an "at will employer" meaning I don't even have to give notice if I don't want to. They will probably offer me more money because they are desperate but it is not the money.

    Any suggestions on how to handle my resignation?
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  2. 28 Comments

  3. by   kiszi
    Leave if you must, but if the company policy is to give a month notice and you only give two weeks, you can expect to not be eligible for rehire. Is it possible to sit down with the DON and discuss your concerns, or it is beyond that by this point?
  4. by   nsue
    I understand but am ok for no rehire. Plan to work as charge or hospice nurse. No salaried job for me.
  5. by   CoolKidsRN
    The healthcare system is extremely small. If you can avoid burning bridges, that maybe in your best interest. Give the required 1 month notice.
  6. by   peripateticRN
    I know it sounds easier said than done, but have you tried setting reasonable limits with your time? Salary work can be difficult that way, but sometimes, when 5pm rolls around you have to just shut'er down and go home (within reason of course). It's very easy in these situations to allow management to take advantage of you and your time and by allowing it to happen is part of the problem - they'll keep heaping on the work until you break. It's NOT your responsibility to work 12 hour days to catch up.
    It sounds like there were some growing pains with your orientation process and not being trained on certain aspects, but as time has passed these issues will (or should) decrease as you fully learn the role.
    Before throwing the baby out with the bathwater I would try having a conversation with management and setting some limits with your time and their expectations. If things don't change then I would would say to definitely leave - with or without the months notice.
  7. by   nsue
    Quote from peripateticRN
    I know it sounds easier said than done, but have you tried setting reasonable limits with your time? Salary work can be difficult that way, but sometimes, when 5pm rolls around you have to just shut'er down and go home (within reason of course). It's very easy in these situations to allow management to take advantage of you and your time and by allowing it to happen is part of the problem - they'll keep heaping on the work until you break. It's NOT your responsibility to work 12 hour days to catch up.
    It sounds like there were some growing pains with your orientation process and not being trained on certain aspects, but as time has passed these issues will (or should) decrease as you fully learn the role.
    Before throwing the baby out with the bathwater I would try having a conversation with management and setting some limits with your time and their expectations. If things don't change then I would would say to definitely leave - with or without the months notice.
    Thanks for the advice! One problem is admits that take a couple of hours. There is no warning you are going to get one and have to stay til 7. So tired when I get home and hubby feeling frustrated as I'm asleep by 8. I appreciate your suggestions but have interview for management that pays hourly. I agree if I don't get job I need to sit down with them and discuss the problems. Thank you, smart nursing opinions matter!
  8. by   peripateticRN
    Good luck with your interview!
  9. by   dishes
    Quote from nsue
    Thanks for the advice! One problem is admits that take a couple of hours. There is no warning you are going to get one and have to stay til 7. So tired when I get home and hubby feeling frustrated as I'm asleep by 8. I appreciate your suggestions but have interview for management that pays hourly. I agree if I don't get job I need to sit down with them and discuss the problems. Thank you, smart nursing opinions matter!
    You may be going from the frying pan into the fire, leaving your current job for a management position. I have yet to see a manager who doesn't work longer hours than the hours they agreed to when they were hired.
  10. by   TriciaJ
    If they put money into training you and have burned through 4 predecessors and you're about to run away screaming, then it's worth their while to listen to your concerns. If you're putting in all kinds of uncompensated time then they're the ones who have put you in a bind.

    It's time to have a come-to-Jesus talk with these people. If they don't want to keep throwing good training money after bad they need to quit burning people out. Tell them exactly what you told us. Your job is unsustainable, your family is bearing the brunt and if they want you to stay they have to make some changes. For starters, you need to be paid for every hour that you're there, or you flat-out leave on time. You're the only one who can process a new admit? That's just stupid. Time to train some other people to at least do the bare bones until you're back in the morning.

    Make a list and ask for what you want. If they say no just head on out and don't look back.
  11. by   cardiacfreak
    Don't expect to get out on time as a charge nurse. Also, I work hospice and I am salary and work longer hours than I did at the hospital. Just saying things are not always greener on the other side.
  12. by   nsue
    Thanks! The other rcms don't seem to mind the hours but they have been there longer and can't catch up either. Too stressful to always be behind. The other job I applied for pays 10 more an hour and not salary. Better for my family. I should tell them the truth as to why I am leaving so they actually train the nurse who takes over or they will never keep someone.
  13. by   Workitinurfava
    They wouldn't feel bad for firing you to save their but so do what you have to do. A month is too long to give often times, many future jobs will not wait a month for you to start.
  14. by   JJ the crit RN
    I'm afraid I don't agree with those who want you to give a month notice. This employer's problems are not your problems. If they burn through managers like you've said then they got issues. You're in this life for you, they're a means to survive. I also don't agree that healthcare is a small neighborhood, do you live in the middle of nowhere? I left one hospital with no notice, none, just called staffing and told them I wouldn't be back. A year later they rehired me, and I thought oh yeah, this is why I left. So I left again and worked a year apiece at various hospitals before settling for one. Do what you have to do, it's not working out for you, you're tired all the time, you're working for nothing at times, are you kidding me? Quit and be gone. You owe them nothing. You're burning that bridge because it's just led to misery.

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