Accident Scenes: Do You Always Offer Assistance? - page 4

by JW2011 11,205 Views | 82 Comments

Ok, so I have read what many have felt their obligation would be on the scene of an accident, but what would you do if you caused the accident, hitting a pedestrian, country road, EMS 10 minutes or more away, obvious head injury,... Read More


  1. 0
    I think the driver read this same book you subscribe to.

    Quote from 8mpg
    My simple answer is... if you dont know what you are doing, dont do anything
  2. 1
    Please don't take the poster as being flippant - like other posters, I just don't think you will ever make sense out of the senseless death of your precious son.

    We can only offer our sympathy.
    Meriwhen likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from JD'sMom
    I think the driver read this same book you subscribe to.
    Im sorry to say it but there are many times that it is better to do nothing. As a previous EMT and having been on accident scenes, it is often better people not get involved and allow the properly trained people handle the situation. Many nurses dont know that holding Cspine is important. They feel like they need to get someone out of the car. Causing a person to become para/quadriplegic due to ignorance is not a good idea. Many jump into a situation without regard to scene safety. Many nurses while intentions are good, may not have emergency training. I can tell you from seeing how often out own nursing staff freezes during a code.
  4. 0
    This was a pedestrian, that SHE hit. It would be great if there were someone there trained in emergency to take over or handle it, and of course that would be the best case scenario, but it isn't what existed! My question was if YOU were an RN and there was nobody there to render aid, in an accident that YOU caused, would you feel obligated to offer ANY assistance in the face of NONE?


    Quote from 8mpg
    Im sorry to say it but there are many times that it is better to do nothing. As a previous EMT and having been on accident scenes, it is often better people not get involved and allow the properly trained people handle the situation. Many nurses dont know that holding Cspine is important. They feel like they need to get someone out of the car. Causing a person to become para/quadriplegic due to ignorance is not a good idea. Many jump into a situation without regard to scene safety. Many nurses while intentions are good, may not have emergency training. I can tell you from seeing how often out own nursing staff freezes during a code.
  5. 0
    I AM trained. I am an EMT. If I caused an accident of course I would stop regardless, but what I do is dependent upon what I CAN do. Pulling a victim from a car can cause so much more damage than if left there. I would never remove a patient from where they were. I would never move a patient even if they lay on the ground. C-spine protection is the first and foremost important thing at the scene of an accident and doing anything other than that, has the potential to cause even more damage. We hear of cases often where a medical trained person tries to pull a victim from a car and is being sued and losing because they did not do it properly. Is your license worth losing over that? Even if you caused the accident?

    The only help that can be offered is determining how many patients there are at the scene. Dialing 911 and holding c-spine for one of the patients. If you want to take a history on a verbal patient great, but any more than that, you risk much harm.
  6. 1
    First I want to say that I'm so sorry for your loss and I hope you find some peace.As for me, in this siituation, if there was an obvious head injury, I wouldn't move the injured person even if that meant they stayed face down in the middle of the road. I would like to think I would be calm enough to take a pulse or make sure the injured person was breathing, but if they weren't, there wouldn't be much I could do about it without equipment. My focus would be on calling EMS. FWIW, I can can be sympathetic to someone having difficulty giving directions to their location. I frequently drive on roads that are a mile or so from my house without knowing their exact name. Being emotionally upset (as I imagine anyone in that situation would be) can be disorienting. I would caution you about creating scenes in your head. Do you know for a fact that your son died without anyone touching him or saying anything to him? Maybe finding out more information could be helpful, but it could also cause more trauma. Some counseling for yourself and your family would be beneficial as you try to move forward. Again, I'm so sorry.
    JW2011 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from JD'sMom
    This was a pedestrian, that SHE hit. It would be great if there were someone there trained in emergency to take over or handle it, and of course that would be the best case scenario, but it isn't what existed! My question was if YOU were an RN and there was nobody there to render aid, in an accident that YOU caused, would you feel obligated to offer ANY assistance in the face of NONE?
    If Im not trained as EMS or for any type of trauma/emergency training, I probably would only offer to call 911. While we do have good Samaritan laws that do protect us, you must remember that you are only protected under YOUR scope of practice and training. If you are not trained to take care of a person with a femur fracture and move the leg, you could possible cause major bleeding from a punctured femoral artery. You may not have proper equipment (even gloves) to protect the patient and yourself. EMS training will ALWAYS tell you safety first (your safety before patient safety). Just because someone is a nurse or doctor doesnt mean they are qualified in emergency situations. You will find many doctors will not get involved as they assume liability and as a more qualified practitioner than EMS will be obligated to care for and assume responsibility until the patient is turned over to a hospital ER physician.
  8. 0
    Sadly with head injuries, even with all the equipment and training in the world, we are all delicate creatures.
  9. 1
    Whether I caused it or not if I saw that the injured were dying (not breathing, bleeding out, etc...) then I would take action because you would not face the risk of additional harm.

    If they appeared stable I would keep them still until EMS appeared on scene.

    I am so sorry that you do not have even the comfort of the human touch for your child. I would hope though that all the wonderful human touch and love he experienced all his life from you and his family filled up his heart and head.
    JW2011 likes this.
  10. 1
    I know that I personally would try and render help, but then again, i've had pre hospital training (EMT) and i'm a trained firefighter. If I were the one causing the accident, though, i don't know how i'd react. I'd like to think i'd be calm enough to try and do some sort of basic assessment on extent of injuries or simply living or dead, but i know a lot of people, regardless of training, regardless of licenses, degrees or certifications would not be capable of being calm enough to even call for help. A person may be an RN, but that doesn't mean they will use their training in a panic. I am sorry for your loss, there is nothing I can say that will make this any less painful for you. May your son be at peace.
    JW2011 likes this.


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