"The View" insults nursing - page 7

Take Action! "The View" doesn't seem to include nursing June 16, 2003 -- Tonight's prime time episode of ABC's "The View," which consisted of a "His and Her Body Test" designed to impart basic... Read More

  1. by   ucandoit
    I am so tempted to go to the show, sit in the audience and ask them, on behalf of all nurses, what they have to say for themselves!Oh, I forgot ...I don't have time to do that! I am way too busy saving lives!Guess a letter will have to do!
  2. by   NewNurse2003
    Originally posted by fab4fan
    I'm even more troubled hearing that Barbara defended this on 20/20.

    They have eyes but they cannot see...they have ears but they cannot hear.
    What did she say in defense of The View?? Anyone know?
  3. by   mario_ragucci
    The View is a cool show in that it's slant is outragous. My total Views seen =(3..5) episodes. The variety is a change, and I always am entertained by the View, Oprah,Dr. Phil and so on.
  4. by   Huq
    Catsrule16 thinks the program went downhill after Lisa Ling left.

    I think the program went downhill when Lisa Ling started.
  5. by   SandySummers
    this is clipped from the 20/20 newsletter that Barbara Walters sends out prior to Friday's show:

    "Doing The View in prime time, as we did this past Monday, was a hoot. We had a lot of fun, while trying to get some serious information across about major health issues. If we pulled it off, our viewers got both facts and laughs from the program. And it gave us an opportunity to get more dolled-up than we do in the morning!"
  6. by   Gator,SN
    "Doing The View in prime time, as we did this past Monday, was a hoot. We had a lot of fun, while trying to get some serious information across about major health issues. If we pulled it off, our viewers got both facts and laughs from the program. And it gave us an opportunity to get more dolled-up than we do in the morning!"
    Disgusting!
  7. by   pwp1289
    i didn't see the show but can see from most responses it wasn't a positive for nurses.i have been a nurse--bedside all the time--for 38 years --and when my neice just graduated from a bs college with her rn --a gave her a big hug and said''hope you enjoy it as much as i have" i wouldnt change one thing!!!!
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by SandySummers
    this is clipped from the 20/20 newsletter that Barbara Walters sends out prior to Friday's show:

    "Doing The View in prime time, as we did this past Monday, was a hoot. We had a lot of fun, while trying to get some serious information across about major health issues. If we pulled it off, our viewers got both facts and laughs from the program. And it gave us an opportunity to get more dolled-up than we do in the morning!"
    weeeeeeellllll there ya go. Anyone STILL holding his/her breath????
  9. by   Catsrule16
    Sent this email to the Today Show. Maybe another broadcasting company may envoke a response.


    Hello;

    My name is Margaret. I am a nurse. Wanted to tell you guys of an incident that has many nurses offended that a rival broadcasting company did.

    Copied from the allnurses.com Nursing Discusion Board for nurses. The thread title is "The View" insults nursing.

    June 16, 2003 -- Tonight's prime time episode of ABC's "The View," which
    consisted of a "His and Her Body Test" designed to impart basic health
    information, included an attack on nursing, with co-host Meredith Vieira
    appearing disguised as an "ugly nurse"--as Vieira herself put it in
    previews--for comic interactions with passersby in a New York mall,
    including one segment in which Vieira cared for a woman's "shin splints"
    by drawing a happy face on her leg.

    The episode was structured around a series of multiple choice questions on health issues, with an unsurprising focus on sexuality, and it did convey some useful information. The talk show's four co-hosts and a few celebrity guests offered serious and joking answers to the test questions. A rotating crew of physicians served as quizmasters, supplying the correct answers and graciously accepting praise (such as Vieira's comment that those with the highest total quiz scores were so smart they should have gone to medical school), as well as the other benefits of appearing on national television. Of course, the lack of any real nurses on a show devoted to the patient education and preventative care at which they excel, though unfortunate, is hardly unusual in a media environment still dominated by physician-centric views.

    But what made the episode so anti-nurse was Vieira's "ugly nurse" segments. In contrast to the high regard the show displayed for the articulate, telegenic physicians, the "ugly nurse"'s appearance was cosmetically sabotaged. ("The View"'s web site describes these segments as Ms. Vieira "harassing unsuspecting folks at New York's Nanuet Mall when she went undercover disguised as a nurse.") The "ugly nurse" displayed no real expertise. Instead, she asked shoppers inane questions about faking orgasms and whether happy faces relieved the pain of shin splints. To the extent these segments had a conscious purpose beyond getting laughs, it may have been to emphasize how badly the average person needs the kind of guidance the episode provided, a point also made in one physician's recounting of the results of a poll the home audience had taken using the quiz questions. But the effect of using a "nurse" for this was to reinforce a harmful stereotype, namely that nurses are ditzy lightweights without knowledge or skills.

    The "ugly" element operated as a curious final kick, since it is still far more common to see the reverse stereotype of the attractive "naughty nurse" in the media. We can only speculate that the show, sensitive to some women's issues, could see the problems with objectifying a female character, so it chose to go in the opposite direction.

    Today, in the midst of a nursing shortage that is one of the nation's gravest public health problems--when dedicated, highly skilled nurses save or improve millions of lives every day despite short staffing that endangers their patients' health and their own well-being--it is sad that some seem to feel that female empowerment involves slavishly embracing medicine, to which women can now aspire, while blatantly disrespecting nurses, over 90% of whom are still women. To see these attitudes on Barbara Walters' "The View"--a popular, award-winning show celebrated for being progressive on women's issues--is more than a little ironic.

    The author of the post is Sandy Summers. She is the Executive Director of the Center for Nursing Advocacy.

    Since this post appeared on the bulletin board, many impassioned nurses have emailed both ABC and Johnson and Johnson (the sponsor of the episode) their disproval of the way The View portrayed the Nursing Profession. There has been no comment from ABC or The VIew to date. Wouldn't it be interesting for a rival broadcast company to investigate this issue?

    Here is the link to the post.

    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...=&pagenumber=1

    Here are Ms Summers links.

    ssummers@nursingadvocacy.org
    www.nursingadvocacy.org

    She has a lot of info on the portrayal of nurses in the media.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    GOOD WORK CATSRULE!
  11. by   Good_Queen_Bess
    I didn't see the programme as they don't have it here. However, I want to put my 2 pence in!

    This is not about whether you have a sense of humour or not. The fact is, is that nurses in the media are pepetually portrayed as doctors hand maidens/nymphomaniacs,/"matronly-types" or seen as unskilled.
    Yet we know that we are all highly-trained, highly-skilled people. WE are the ones who spot and deal with emergencies BEFORE and often instead of doctors.
    I find this type of thing insulting.
  12. by   sassynurse78
    Originally posted by Good_Queen_Bess
    I didn't see the programme as they don't have it here. However, I want to put my 2 pence in!

    This is not about whether you have a sense of humour or not. The fact is, is that nurses in the media are pepetually portrayed as doctors hand maidens/nymphomaniacs,/"matronly-types" or seen as unskilled.
    Yet we know that we are all highly-trained, highly-skilled people. WE are the ones who spot and deal with emergencies BEFORE and often instead of doctors.
    I find this type of thing insulting.

    I totally agree, I used your "we know that we are all highly-trained, highly-skilled people. WE are the ones who spot and deal with emergencies BEFORE and often instead of doctors.
    I find this type of thing insulting." in part of my letter to the "veiw" and to all the hosts, hope ya don't mind it was just well said!!
  13. by   fergus51
    It should be noted that many professions are stereotyped in the media as well. Might make us all look differently at shows about lawyers, cops, etc.

close