"I don't want to do bed side nursing"...SAY WHAT! - page 10

had a couple different nursing students say: "well, i'm going to school so i don't have to do bed side nursing". one even told me she want to work in plastic surg. office, not at the bed side. ... Read More

  1. by   arita2
    Quote from lizz
    Yep ... government pension is what I'm going for, definitely. Virtually all of the hospitals have cut pension benefits in my area. I am NOT going to be a pauper with no pension in my '60s.

    No profession is worth that ... period.

    :typing
    At 54, I am with you on that! As an RN, I will look to work for the state or the fed in order to get some kind of pention for later. I have over 6 years with a state pention fund working in education and I will look to keep that growing or combine it with a fed pention. I have a lot of compassion and will give excellent patient care, but I need to get school loans paid off and take care of my golden years too.
  2. by   *RubySlippers*
    Quote from arita2
    Hi,

    Guess i will throw my 2 cents in here. I am beginning nursing school in January. I have worked very hard to get there and will continue to work hard. However, I don't believe that I am to become an RN to change beds, wipe butts, or anything else that is a Techs job. There is nothing wrong with any of those things in patient care, and I will do it on occasion as needed, no doubt, but that is NOT why I am putting myself through the expense and effort of going to school.

    I have been an Aid in the past, enjoyed it, but those days are done for me. While I have the ability to do some lifting, it's not what I envision for myself as primary duty for hours on end. If that were so, I would not bother to go on to school. You have your job description, and I will have mine. You certainly won't be filling out my reports or giving meds if I run behind helping you even if I have to work well beyond my shift, now will you? Then why expect BSNs or RNs to do your job and belittle them if they are not keen on it?

    I agree that we are both in this to give our utmost to our patients and in the end, the patients well being is what counts. I believe that will have more chance of happening if we each stick to our own jobs and do it the best we can. If I am tied up doing a Techs job, my extended trainning beyond that of a Tech won't be used as effectively it should be. I am sure you would feel the same if the shoe were on the other foot. : )

    First of all I am not trying to step on anyones toes, or down play what nurses did in the past, or tech jobs, CNA, etc. I am stating facts & my own personal feelings which I think everyone on this board is entitled to, especially if it is different than mine, variety is what makes this world go around, other wise we would all be doing the same job, then where would we be?

    I totally agree with the above statement, I am not going through all of these technical procedures in school and paying all of this money and having to learn all of this critical care information, to be a tech/aid, again nothing wrong with that, my mother is a tech and has been for years, she is the one who has encouraged me to go back to school for my RN, so I don't have to do the job she does. By the way she is a excellent CNA/tech and has great respect at the Hospital and in the community.

    I agree if I am spending all of my time making beds, changing bed pans, bathing & feeding patients, who is going to hang the meds, hang the blood, put in foleys, put in feeding tubes, the list goes on and on, it sure won't be the tech, so then not only am I doing my job, I am doing their job too and they can't help me with my job. Its called the ladder everyone has a certain job, and at my local hospital there are CNA's, LPNs, RNs, & docs, they all have diff jobs, do they help each other when they can? sure, will I help when I can, of course, am I going to do it all? NO Way, I have not suffered throught the hectic schedule, the instructor abuse and torture tests to do something I am already certified to do as a CNA. Sorry.

    And, also, if you think about it "traditional nursing" that everyone is talking about or so keen on nurses today suffering through or starting at the bottom (whatever that means), is not like, it used to be, it was a lot different in the past, they were not required to know the things we have to know now, or do the procedures we have to do now, most of their job was total physical patient care, the docs, did alot of the procedures we have to do now in school, also, alot of nurses years ago did not even have to go to school as long as we do, I am talking moons ago, that is where the traditional nurse started (Ms. Nightingale), that is why now we have Techs, LPNs, & RNs, each is to learn a different step in Nursing, not one person is required to do it all.

    When I worked as an CNA I liked it, I worked on Oncology and loved the patients, it was the CNAs I worked with that were awful, they hated RNs, all they did was talk about them, how they never did anything or they make all that money and don't do the labor, or they would not ever go to school to be an RN, and they would complain and gripe about their job all the time and how it was unfair what they had to do and get paid less. I just wanted to look at them and say "Then why are you here? Why are you a CNA, Why didn't you go to school to be a RN? Go to Walmart and work. I had a bad experience with those CNA's, I just stayed away from them.

    So to end my soap box, if you want to be a RN, be one, if you want to be a CNa be one, but don't gripe because you have to do your job. And yes, when you get out of school as an RN you do have opportunites where you don't have to do patient care, or bedside care, who said that was what you went Nursing School to do anyway? Some people call it a "calling" but for some it is a way of feeding their families and putting their children through school. The ones that don't want to do patient care should not be judged I am sorry but that is not the definition of Registered Nursing anymore, people really need to deal with it.
  3. by   tridil2000
    whenever someone acts like bedpans etc are below them with me, i say, "imagine you were ill and scared in the hospital with let's say, cancer, and the dr was in your room with you, and you all of a sudden had to have diarrhea. what would you think if the dr put your chart down and quickly offered you a bedpan? would you think that was "below" her? or would you think the dr really cares about you as a person, and didn't want you to have an accident on yourself?"
    it's not about the task, it's about treating people with dignity when they are at the lowest point in their entire lives.
  4. by   nurse4theplanet
    I have said before and I will say again, if you don't want to do bedside nursing, for whatever reason, don't do it...let someone else take on that task. If I am a patient, I want a nurse there who cares about me and wants to be at the bedside. It does not upset me one bit when someone says they don't want to be a bedside nurse.

    Nursing is so much more than giving baths, making beds, and wiping butts. Anyone with half a brain knows that. It doesn't take a degree to accomplish those tasks, they are just a hazard that comes along with the job. And if you love your pts and have true compassion, you don't mind doing this for them and realize it is only a very small part of your job discription.

    There is so much diversity and posibilities in nursing that if someone doesn't want to be a bedside nurse, why should the bedside nurses, or anyone really, complain? Do you want to work alongside, or manage, a nurse who is forced to do a year of med-surg? I wouldn't. I want co-workers/employees that are excited about and satisfied with their job position. They produce the best outcome for the patient. If these nurses prefer, they can work in OPS, ambulatory care clinics, health departments, schools, planned parenthood, etc.

    Don't put down bedside nursing because you imply that being a bedside nurse does not encompass skill and knowledge, only dirty work. Don't discourage another for seeking another avenue in nursing that needs to be filled simply because it is not the conventional way in which things "should/used to be done".
  5. by   Nitngale
    Quote from *RubySlippers*
    First of all I am not trying to step on anyones toes, or down play what nurses did in the past, or tech jobs, CNA, etc. I am stating facts & my own personal feelings which I think everyone on this board is entitled to, especially if it is different than mine, variety is what makes this world go around, other wise we would all be doing the same job, then where would we be?

    I totally agree with the above statement, I am not going through all of these technical procedures in school and paying all of this money and having to learn all of this critical care information, to be a tech/aid, again nothing wrong with that, my mother is a tech and has been for years, she is the one who has encouraged me to go back to school for my RN, so I don't have to do the job she does. By the way she is a excellent CNA/tech and has great respect at the Hospital and in the community.

    I agree if I am spending all of my time making beds, changing bed pans, bathing & feeding patients, who is going to hang the meds, hang the blood, put in foleys, put in feeding tubes, the list goes on and on, it sure won't be the tech, so then not only am I doing my job, I am doing their job too and they can't help me with my job. Its called the ladder everyone has a certain job, and at my local hospital there are CNA's, LPNs, RNs, & docs, they all have diff jobs, do they help each other when they can? sure, will I help when I can, of course, am I going to do it all? NO Way, I have not suffered throught the hectic schedule, the instructor abuse and torture tests to do something I am already certified to do as a CNA. Sorry.

    And, also, if you think about it "traditional nursing" that everyone is talking about or so keen on nurses today suffering through or starting at the bottom (whatever that means), is not like, it used to be, it was a lot different in the past, they were not required to know the things we have to know now, or do the procedures we have to do now, most of their job was total physical patient care, the docs, did alot of the procedures we have to do now in school, also, alot of nurses years ago did not even have to go to school as long as we do, I am talking moons ago, that is where the traditional nurse started (Ms. Nightingale), that is why now we have Techs, LPNs, & RNs, each is to learn a different step in Nursing, not one person is required to do it all.

    When I worked as an CNA I liked it, I worked on Oncology and loved the patients, it was the CNAs I worked with that were awful, they hated RNs, all they did was talk about them, how they never did anything or they make all that money and don't do the labor, or they would not ever go to school to be an RN, and they would complain and gripe about their job all the time and how it was unfair what they had to do and get paid less. I just wanted to look at them and say "Then why are you here? Why are you a CNA, Why didn't you go to school to be a RN? Go to Walmart and work. I had a bad experience with those CNA's, I just stayed away from them.

    So to end my soap box, if you want to be a RN, be one, if you want to be a CNa be one, but don't gripe because you have to do your job. And yes, when you get out of school as an RN you do have opportunites where you don't have to do patient care, or bedside care, who said that was what you went Nursing School to do anyway? Some people call it a "calling" but for some it is a way of feeding their families and putting their children through school. The ones that don't want to do patient care should not be judged I am sorry but that is not the definition of Registered Nursing anymore, people really need to deal with it.
    Actually Ms. Ruby, the reason for the break up of nursing duties was a monetary one. Back in the day, the nurse didn't do alot of things because there was a more limited technology. By breaking up nursing into CNA, LVN, RN (2 year) and BSN---it justified different pay scales. Old school nurses went to college for four years to be called a nurse. So they put in more hours and more money (in yesterdays monies) then todays two year RNs AND they did the dirty work. You go to the hospitals today and LVN's and CNAs do alot of the work with an RN in charge. Actually, your response has backed my position that most go into nursing for the money. That's fine, but a paper pusher is just that a paper pusher. If there is no shame in NOT doing patient care then be proud to call yourself an administrator. Even today the average person identifies nursing with direct patient care. Alot of schools interview perspective students nowadays; I wonder what song and dance about caring for people was done by many whom today want no direct contact with patients :uhoh21:
  6. by   Nitngale
    Quote from tridil2000
    whenever someone acts like bedpans etc are below them with me, i say, "imagine you were ill and scared in the hospital with let's say, cancer, and the dr was in your room with you, and you all of a sudden had to have diarrhea. what would you think if the dr put your chart down and quickly offered you a bedpan? would you think that was "below" her? or would you think the dr really cares about you as a person, and didn't want you to have an accident on yourself?"
    it's not about the task, it's about treating people with dignity when they are at the lowest point in their entire lives.
    Well put
  7. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from Nitngale
    Actually Ms. Ruby, the reason for the break up of nursing duties was a monetary one. Back in the day, the nurse didn't do alot of things because there was a more limited technology. By breaking up nursing into CNA, LVN, RN (2 year) and BSN---it justified different pay scales. Old school nurses went to college for four years to be called a nurse. So they put in more hours and more money (in yesterdays monies) then todays two year RNs AND they did the dirty work. You go to the hospitals today and LVN's and CNAs do alot of the work with an RN in charge. Actually, your response has backed my position that most go into nursing for the money. That's fine, but a paper pusher is just that a paper pusher. If there is no shame in NOT doing patient care then be proud to call yourself an administrator. Even today the average person identifies nursing with direct patient care. Alot of schools interview perspective students nowadays; I wonder what song and dance about caring for people was done by many whom today want no direct contact with patients :uhoh21:
    First off, nurses are not broken up into RN and BSN- an RN is simply an RN, no matter what educational path got them to the point where they could take the NCLEX-RN. Also, you should check your facts on the 'old school' nurses who all went to school for 4 years- hospital nursing was evolved from hospital training programs. There was actually a lot of resistance to the notion of college education for nurses back then. And don't forget that in the early days of hospital nursing, a LOT of the work was actually being a maid as well. Yes, doctors did a great deal of the work that nurses now do. It wasn't just technology; it was training, skill level, and the perception of nursing as a low-skilled job, not a profession.

    I don't understand the comment about being proud to call yourself an administrator. I suppose I'd be called a 'paper pusher' as a researcher (even though I rarely do anything involving actual paper, y'know?). But I'm a registered nurse. I am practicing nursing as a part of my job. I haven't stopped being a nurse because I utilize my skills and knowledge away from the bedside. So I'm going to continue calling myself a nurse- because I *am* a nurse.

    And, for the record, I *did* have to interview for my nursing school program. I was completely honest about my desire to work in research. I felt no need to do a song and dance. I knew what I wanted in a nursing career, and I was willing to do whatever I needed to do to make that happen. If my goals were a problem, they would've kept me out of the program.

    One more thing- I have a question for anyone who says that money doesn't figure in to their reasons for being a nurse. Why aren't they working for free?
  8. by   arita2
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I have said before and I will say again, if you don't want to do bedside nursing, for whatever reason, don't do it...let someone else take on that task. If I am a patient, I want a nurse there who cares about me and wants to be at the bedside. It does not upset me one bit when someone says they don't want to be a bedside nurse.

    Nursing is so much more than giving baths, making beds, and wiping butts. Anyone with half a brain knows that. It doesn't take a degree to accomplish those tasks, they are just a hazard that comes along with the job. And if you love your pts and have true compassion, you don't mind doing this for them and realize it is only a very small part of your job discription.

    There is so much diversity and posibilities in nursing that if someone doesn't want to be a bedside nurse, why should the bedside nurses, or anyone really, complain? Do you want to work alongside, or manage, a nurse who is forced to do a year of med-surg? I wouldn't. I want co-workers/employees that are excited about and satisfied with their job position. They produce the best outcome for the patient. If these nurses prefer, they can work in OPS, ambulatory care clinics, health departments, schools, planned parenthood, etc.

    Don't put down bedside nursing because you imply that being a bedside nurse does not encompass skill and knowledge, only dirty work. Don't discourage another for seeking another avenue in nursing that needs to be filled simply because it is not the conventional way in which things "should/used to be done".
    To quickly clear this up, I am not putting down bedside nursing. I am a kind and compassionate person and, I have worked as a Nurse Aid and loved doing it. I am 54 now though and don't have the back to lift and tug on patients or make 30+ beds a shift like I used to. That does not mean that I won't do my part, or will grouse about doing it. I enjoy working with people, helping those in need and don't mind patient contact in the least. However again, I am not in my 20's now, and I am undertaking these studies so that I can move to the next care giving level and not spend an entire shift doing CNA/Tech work. Again, if I wanted or could continue doing their work, I would not undertake nursing studies, and all it entails.

    It's going to be hard work and require loans to accomplish this. Finally becoming a nurse will be worth the effort though and, it will be rewarding to be in a position to help others in such a satisfying way. I will be in debt for years for the effort and may well go into retirement with debt still to pay. For this committment on my part, however, I don't think it reasonable for CNAs to expect me to do their work on top of mine. I never expected help from the nurses to make a bed or change/bathe a patient when I was a nurse-aid. Nurse aids helped each other and if absolutely necessary, we asked an LPN for help if we were in a bind and needed an extra set of hands. Now and then a nurse might step in to observe us, or talk with a patient while care was given, and might give a bit of help or take over if she chose as part of her patient care and assessment, but it was not expected or asked for by the nurse aids. Has this changed?
  9. by   nursehellokitty04
    i am a new nurse only been a nurse 3 years before that i was a cna for 4 years and i am in school for my RN now the most satifying thing to me (and forgive the spelling i just got off of work and i am dead) is to be able to asses the patient there is alot i can tell just by the way my patient is talking to me.
    now i know i have a long way to go and you have to crawl before you walk but what the new grad is forgetting that patients tummy tuck might get infected and who is going to be doing the dsg change! lol reality will hit her in the face lol
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from tridil2000
    whenever someone acts like bedpans etc are below them with me, i say, "imagine you were ill and scared in the hospital with let's say, cancer, and the dr was in your room with you, and you all of a sudden had to have diarrhea. what would you think if the dr put your chart down and quickly offered you a bedpan? would you think that was "below" her? or would you think the dr really cares about you as a person, and didn't want you to have an accident on yourself?"
    it's not about the task, it's about treating people with dignity when they are at the lowest point in their entire lives.
    I don't think bedpans are below me at all but, I think it's a lot more complicated than whether you care for the patient or not. I also blame management for not giving us effective tools to deal with things like diarrhea. Especially since we get patients with non-stop diarrhea where they keep going even while you're changing them.

    I don't have time to change a patient 10-20 times a day and neither does the aide ... nobody does. So what really happens? No matter how hard you try, they're going to be dirty and there's going to be skin breakdown not to mention, if they have a foley (which they often do) ... they're probably going to get a UTI from that as well.

    At one hospital where I worked they had these really great, very flexible, very comfortable fecal bags for cases like this but, I've only seen these fecal bags at one hospital ... probably because the other hospitals don't want to spend money on it.

    So, just recently at another hospital I had a patient with non-stop bloody, diarrhea who also had a foley. Those fecal bags would have really come in handy because I just could not keep this patient clean, no matter how hard I tried.

    This is one of many things that frustrate me about floor nursing. There are tools available to make the job and the patients better but, management won't invest in them.

    And if you dare say you don't have time to clean up diarrhea 10-20 times a day (and, as an RN you really don't) then you get accused of being lazy, being a primma donna, not caring about the patients and not being a real nurse.

    I guess it's better for the patients to develop a pressure sore and/or a UTI with the old wipe and change system.

    I find the whole thing incredibly frustrating.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 10, '06
  11. by   hecete
    I Work In A 180 Bed Snf. As The Only Rn On The Floor I Am Responsible For 30 Residents. My Duties Include , Ans The Phone, Passing Meds, Making Sure Labs Are Drawn, If Not I Do It, Making Sure Lab Results Are Reported To Md., Making Sure Residents Get To Appointments, Treatments, Assessing Every Resident For Changes, Working The Dinning Room Bedside Nursing Care, Dealing With The Crazies, Not Only Residents, But The Staff, Getting Reamed On A Daily Basis By Famlies Because Things Aren't Perfect,
    Trachs, Piccs, Ijs, Pegs, Transcribe All Orders, Admissions, Discharges And Whatever Else Is Tossed My Way. I Manage To Do This 12hrs. A Day 5 Days A Week. Don,t Tell Me There Are No Bedside Nurses, Come Work Where I Work.
  12. by   angel337
    there is no complete wrong or right answer to this subject, but the reality is that nursing is a hard job. i work with alot of miserable nurses because they HATE doing bedside care, but continue to do it because they have bills to pay and very often those 9-5 office/clinic jobs don't have the same pay or flexibilty that bedside does. do they treat the patients bad? no. but if they could do something else that offered similiar pay and flexibilty they would be gone in a heart beat. many nurses don't want to get out of their comfort zone either, so this also contributes to job dissatisfaction. Bedside nursing is not a glamorous job, and i think that it is important for people to know that before getting into it, but there is room out there for everyone to spread their wings in healthcare, bedside or not.
  13. by   *RubySlippers*
    Quote from Nitngale
    Actually Ms. Ruby, the reason for the break up of nursing duties was a monetary one. Back in the day, the nurse didn't do alot of things because there was a more limited technology. By breaking up nursing into CNA, LVN, RN (2 year) and BSN---it justified different pay scales. Old school nurses went to college for four years to be called a nurse. So they put in more hours and more money (in yesterdays monies) then todays two year RNs AND they did the dirty work. You go to the hospitals today and LVN's and CNAs do alot of the work with an RN in charge. Actually, your response has backed my position that most go into nursing for the money. That's fine, but a paper pusher is just that a paper pusher. If there is no shame in NOT doing patient care then be proud to call yourself an administrator. Even today the average person identifies nursing with direct patient care. Alot of schools interview perspective students nowadays; I wonder what song and dance about caring for people was done by many whom today want no direct contact with patients :uhoh21:
    Again, this quote above is the reason why (I feel like, in my opinion) people need to learn Nursing is Diverse, and quit putting down nurses who don't want to do patient care. These nurses sure don't want to be put down for doing bedside care, but they sure want to put down Nurses that don't want to do it. I realized in Nursing school that I do not want to do Med/Surge, well excuse me if I feel those patients would be better off without me taking care of them, being miserable and hating it. I think it is great when a Nurse realizes that they would not benefit a patient working in a certain area, instead of being as most stated miserable and hateful to their patients and in their life.

    And as far as why nursing was broken up into different areas, there are many reasons, not just monetary. I was also referring to Nursing from the very beginning, most was not required to go four years, and I do agree with the four year program comment, I am currently working on my Bachelors degree and minor in Psychology.

    Again, this is my opinion, not to reflect on others, and everyone is entitled to their opinion, especially the quote above, diversity (see).

close