Is GI lab nursing for new graduates?

  1. 0
    I am a nursing student interested in GI lab jobs, especially endoscopy. I am worried that I am very unlikely to have a job like that because I would have had no experience as an RN by the time I graduate from my BSN degree, and I have heard that all of the GI RN jobs require experiences. However, I want to work in a GI lab right after graduation. Does any body have any advice for me on how to strengthen my resume for this job? Should I obtain ACLS or at least be a GI clinic nurse before I apply to GI lab jobs?
    P/S: I ask this because I don't want to work in stressful and handy jobs like med/surge, ER, or ICU after I graduate.
  2. 9 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    If you really want it, go for it. I was never a pushy nurse, thought I would have to have a higher degree (ADN here) or have more experience to get away from bedside nursing. So I did 17 years of night shift bedside nursing.

    When I got a job in out patient day surgery/GI nursing I was was so annoyed with myself to meet co-workers who had worked maybe 6 months in acute care bedside nursing, decided it wasn't for them, and applied for and got a (great) job.

    You will need ACLS. Otherwise I don't have any brilliant ideas! Go to GI in services, conferences, etc. Talk to the nurse manager, tell her of your interest, ask to shadow GI nurses. Be a pest????

    If you can only get a job in bed side nursing stick it out and keep being a pest in the GI department.
  4. 0
    Have you considered the OR? A lot of hospitals have OR programs specifically designed for new grads. Based on what you're saying, I think you might like it.

    As for GI lab requirements, it depends on the facility. ACLS, absolutely, and a lot of GI labs require RNs to push Versed and monitor its effects - similar to what a CRNA does. I think, for the most part, the GI lab is not big on hiring new grads. However, like brownbrook says, don't give up!
  5. 0
    Quote from DeLanaHarvickWannabe
    Have you considered the OR? A lot of hospitals have OR programs specifically designed for new grads. Based on what you're saying, I think you might like it.

    As for GI lab requirements, it depends on the facility. ACLS, absolutely, and a lot of GI labs require RNs to push Versed and monitor its effects - similar to what a CRNA does. I think, for the most part, the GI lab is not big on hiring new grads. However, like brownbrook says, don't give up!
    Thanks for your advices. I think I may include OR in my applications too. Is it stressful? Does OR involve a lot of contact with feces and fluids? I can't stand feces, vomit, and urine; blood is fine though. Have you been an OR nurse before? if yes, can you describe one of your typical days?
    Thank you. (I love South Park btw )
  6. 0
    Quote from kyonguyen22
    Thanks for your advices. I think I may include OR in my applications too. Is it stressful? Does OR involve a lot of contact with feces and fluids? I can't stand feces, vomit, and urine; blood is fine though. Have you been an OR nurse before? if yes, can you describe one of your typical days?
    Thank you. (I love South Park btw )
    I was an OR nurse, but for a very short time. It didn't go very well with my personality.

    It all depends on what kind of OR you work in, as to your exposure to things. You might have to start quite a few indwelling catheters for urine. Feces and vomit are not too common, but accidents happen. (You'd see more vomit as a PACU or surgical floor nurse). I would take all of the poop in the world over one orthopedic surgery. (The sounds made by bones are AWFUL!)

    When you get to work, if you're on a scheduled day and not on call, you see what room you have for the day, and what cases are for those rooms. Then, using that information, you see what you can do to help prepare the room and the surgeon. Sometimes you go get the patient yourself from the preop area, and you retrieve any intraop meds before the surgery begins.

    You help position the patient, and help with counts...and basically, you're the one in charge of making sure sterile things stay sterile. When you're circulating, you're basically the non-sterile person, so you answer phones, do all documentation, run and get things, assist in emergencies, etc. Sometimes you will need to relieve the scrub person.

    In the hospital which I worked, nurses did NOT scrub, we had scrub techs. However, we had to know had to scrub, and also how to work in sterile processing. We were staffed pretty well, so the next shift nurse would just come and relieve us even if the case was not finished. It's a different story when you're on call.

    What may be helpful is looking around the OR nurse forums and also find some videos of actual surgeries.

    Hope I helped! Like I said, I wasn't an OR nurse for very long at all, and my hospital was pretty much all scheduled surgeries, no transplants, no cardiac, no trauma, no peds...a medium sized community hospital very close to larger teaching institutions that did those things.
  7. 0
    hey im a new grad in the OR and you said you were an OR nurse too but for a very short time? I was just wondering because I myself am not sure if i fit the personality of an OR nurse plus i do kind of miss the patient interaction which seems so short in the OR. I just wanted to know how long were u in the OR before you left???
  8. 0
    Quote from dontcallmeamurse
    hey im a new grad in the OR and you said you were an OR nurse too but for a very short time? I was just wondering because I myself am not sure if i fit the personality of an OR nurse plus i do kind of miss the patient interaction which seems so short in the OR. I just wanted to know how long were u in the OR before you left???
    I don't know how long exactly, I had a lot of stuff going on in my life. I wasn't a new grad, though - I think all new grads have these sorts of feelings, no matter what the type of nursing.

    But let's just say I was still on orientation!

    I wasn't in an internship program, didn't get a sign on bonus and signed no contract, so it wasn't difficult for me to leave.
  9. 0
    to the original poster: I have to say I find it interesting that someone who can't stand feces, vomit, and urine would ever want to be a nurse in the first place. Also, the patients in a GI Lab may have bowel preps before coming, there is definitely feces involved. Also, I don't think it would be an acceptable place for a new grad with no experience. It is a VERY fast paced environment with a tight schedule to maintain. It's not the place to figure out how to hang an IV, hang blood, administer an antibiotic, or administer narcotics. There are basic things you need to know how to do well before you get there including cardiac monitoring and assessment during conscious sedation. Where I work, the nurses in GI have been nurses somewhere else a LONG time. It's a great job and you have to put in your time before the door opens for you.
  10. 0
    Quote from kyonguyen22
    thanks for your advices. i think i may include or in my applications too. is it stressful? does or involve a lot of contact with feces and fluids? i can't stand feces, vomit, and urine; blood is fine though. have you been an or nurse before? if yes, can you describe one of your typical days?
    thank you. (i love south park btw :d)
    you can't stand feces or vomit yet you want to work in a gi lab?! i'm confused.
  11. 0
    I am a LPN in a GI center, first nursing job also. Maybe if you work in the GI field while you're in school you may have a better chance of working in that specialty after you graduate as a RN? Just a thought but there are many positions within the field and maybe one of them you may be able to do as a student to get your foot in the door.


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