Flight Nurse vs Flight Paramedic - pg.5 | allnurses

Flight Nurse vs Flight Paramedic - page 5

Hello all, Until the other day, I had no idea there was a such thing as a flight paramedic. I thought all of them were flight nurses. What are the differences in pay and training of a flight... Read More

  1. Visit  rghbsn profile page
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    Quote from JeremyNursingStudent
    Question:

    If you need to intubate, who usually does it? I hear medic sometimes and RN others...

    I work in a RN/Paramedic flight program as well, and we have the same functionality as hurricanenikki's team: we are both required to do so many intubations per quarter, and we take turns, essentially. I don't know that'd I'd say our paramedics are more willing, or more apt (though our more experienced crew members are usually more apt, be they RN or medic) but it's a great system. I know that in some states and even some programs, RN's are not allowed to intubate unless they are dual qualified or advanced practice nurses (i.e. CRNA). South Carolina used to only allow paramedics to intubate in the field (I don't know if that is still the case), so many of their flight nurses would get their paramedic so that there was not only one person on scene to intubate.
    I have gotten intubations my medic partner has missed. My partner has gotten intubations that I missed. It's nice to have 2 people available to share the responsibility with. It's a lot more comfortable taking away someone's respiratory drive knowing that there is more than one person here to shoot the tube...
  2. Visit  Medic443 profile page
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    Quote from rghbsn
    I work in a RN/Paramedic flight program as well, and we have the same functionality as hurricanenikki's team: we are both required to do so many intubations per quarter, and we take turns, essentially. I don't know that'd I'd say our paramedics are more willing, or more apt (though our more experienced crew members are usually more apt, be they RN or medic) but it's a great system. I know that in some states and even some programs, RN's are not allowed to intubate unless they are dual qualified or advanced practice nurses (i.e. CRNA). South Carolina used to only allow paramedics to intubate in the field (I don't know if that is still the case), so many of their flight nurses would get their paramedic so that there was not only one person on scene to intubate.
    I have gotten intubations my medic partner has missed. My partner has gotten intubations that I missed. It's nice to have 2 people available to share the responsibility with. It's a lot more comfortable taking away someone's respiratory drive knowing that there is more than one person here to shoot the tube...

    rghbsn you said it pretty well. I am a paramedic currently working on the box still. I have have a lot of friends who work for the air service in my area. They fly Medic/RN here and it works wonderfully. Both are allowed to tube which in my opinion as well is a benefit! Two people who have the training and the knowledge of getting that tube is double the chance the patient out come will be a successfull one! My wife and I will be relocating soon and I am doing my best to get into the field. I can think of nothing else that will give me the satisfaction of knowing I am where I am suppose to be until I reach that goal. I was wondering as I am taking ccemtp this spring if there was anything else I should take as a medic? I currently will have 4 years ground experience as of this february. Thanks for any advice in advance and sorry if i misspelled anything lol spell check is a medics best friend!
  3. Visit  GilaRRT profile page
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    CCEMTP is not a bad introduction. In fact, the first two weeks of my flight orientation was the CCEMTP course. If you have a little money and time a few great online courses exist. The Wingfield Resqshop course and others are also certified as FP-C CEU courses. Obtaining your FP-C credential will also be considered an asset. In addition, getting critical care experience will place you ahead and may be the most important asset you can have if you want to fly.
  4. Visit  Medic443 profile page
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    Thanks! I do work for a service that has critical care needs so that is a plus for me. Of corse I would in no way claim to have seen it all or know it all. I learn from each call I go on and try not to make the same oversites as when I was brand new. Thanks for the class ideas!
  5. Visit  rghbsn profile page
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    Medic443 you have a PM inbound.
  6. Visit  cbringuier profile page
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    I am currently about to take my EMT test to become certified. I know I'm at the very first step of this process but I want to be a flight nurse eventually. I start paramedic school in august from there I wanna do the fire academy and become a firemedic where I plam to gain ems field experience. After that become a flight paramedic then eventually a flight nurse. I'm 19 so I'm young enough to have a full career. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to go about getting hired as a flight medic or just advice in general?
  7. Visit  LouisianaFP-C profile page
    1
    cb,

    if you want to go the flight paramedic route first, you'll need the 3-5 years experience in a heavy volume 911 system, as said before. get every specialty cert that you can and maintain them, not letting them expire. take critical care courses too. then, when a flight paramedic position comes available apply. hopefully you'll get it. then, to become a flight nurse it's going to be like starting at step one again, because you have to again have 3-5 years experience as a rn, either ed or icu. in my area icu is looked at higher than ed. if that offends any of the ed nurses, i apologize. i was stating a regional fact, not my opinion. for both positions, for your interviews, you have to shine! again, you have to shine. i recently switched flight companies. i was told that over fifty people applied for the job. fifteen were allowed to interview. it will probably be the same case when you apply so bring your best. being a flight ________ is the best job in the world. we are called to assist at the most destructive scenes and transport the most critically ill patients. it is a very awesome and humbling feeling to know how much first responders, hospital staff, patients and their family members count down the seconds till they hear the sound of your aircraft approaching the scene or landing at their facility. both flight nurses and flight paramedics are jacks of all trades & masters of many. who gives a crap what procedure your respective state says you can or can't do, what medication you can or can't push? who cares who has the final say so, if that's even the case in your respective locale? bottom line, make the right diagnosis, perform the right treatments and get the patient to definitive care. i think that if you are ever worried about anything other than those three tasks go back to riding in an ambulance or go back to watching the paint dry on the walls inside of a hospital because, i hope that i can speak for all of my fellow flight clinicians worldwide, no of us want you in the fricking aircraft.
    SummitRN likes this.
  8. Visit  beejfrance profile page
    0
    Wow, how "ridonculous", quite arguing and wasting time in life. Go save lives both of you! Cheese-n-rice! LOL
  9. Visit  GilaRRT profile page
    0
    Quote from beejfrance
    Wow, how "ridonculous", quite arguing and wasting time in life. Go save lives both of you! Cheese-n-rice! LOL
    Nobody is arguing, yet. Relax mate...
  10. Visit  954_racer profile page
    0
    What does this community suppose will happen when the paramedic postion evolves into an advance practice role as has been seen in europe, australia, and new zealand. Is it possible the flight companies will do away with flight nurses in favor of these "ditch doctors" ?
  11. Visit  GilaRRT profile page
    0
    Quote from 954_racer
    What does this community suppose will happen when the paramedic postion evolves into an advance practice role as has been seen in europe, australia, and new zealand. Is it possible the flight companies will do away with flight nurses in favor of these "ditch doctors" ?
    What do you mean by "advanced practice?" Nurses are still involved in transport throughout the world. If anything, evolving the paramedic and requiring additional education can only ensure a better educated provider is providing patient care. Also, what exactly do you mean by "ditch doctors?" I've worked with Australian critical care medics and South African B-Tech medics. My old boss overseas was an OZ Critical care medic. Their scope of practice was roughly comparable to many US flight paramedics with the exception that the OZ and SA medics typically had degrees and much more formal education. Clearly, the scope of practice and medical control issues were different, but they roughly operated at the same level as their US counterparts.
  12. Visit  TraumaSurfer profile page
    1
    Quote from 954_racer
    What does this community suppose will happen when the paramedic postion evolves into an advance practice role as has been seen in europe, australia, and new zealand. Is it possible the flight companies will do away with flight nurses in favor of these "ditch doctors" ?
    Advanced practice? No, the Paramedics in other countries just have the appropriate education to perform what many U.S. Paramedics do. The Paramedics in other countries have a better understanding of what they are doing and can function under different guidelines with more autonomy. If they want advanced practice at scene, there may be a physician that responds. The protocols in the U.S. EMS system are usually written for the minimum education standard. For flight, a Paramedic may have additional training and/or an RN can be partnered with them. Some Paramedic flight teams have essentially the same protocols as the ground crews with the only difference being the mode of transportation.

    In Europe, several countries have Physician or nurse led EMS. The nurse led EMS countries include the Netherlands, Spain and parts of Italy which have ALS. The ECP in the U.K. can also be a nurse.

    In the U.S., since flight programs may also do critical care IFT, there is a need to have a provider who is educated and experienced in critical care. Right now that happens to be a nurse.

    I don't see many changes for EMS in the U.S. except for more accountability in the various systems for the way they use resources to justify funding. I don't see this country even requiring an Associates degree for many years so the education will not catch up with the other countries. Some are even against the changes in the NREMT like calling the Intermediate an Advanced EMT which is a more appropriate description or requiring Paramedic programs to be accredited.
    SummitRN likes this.
  13. Visit  Airmed1 profile page
    0
    Depending upon where you practice , your state's scope of practice will be different for a Flight Nurse and a Flight Medic. Both have their own area of expertise and comfort level. Our program does approx 60-70% interfacility transports and 30-40% scene responses. In my experience the Medics tend to take the lead at scenes and the Nurses more so on the interfacility transports (especially the complicated ICU patients with multiple drips being titrated) but we ALWAYS work as a team and utilize each other's strengths. Sometimes it's as simple as where you are located in the aircraft or ground unit in relation to the patient that determines whether you do the intubation or push the drugs. We have the same protocols to follow as a team and we both need to know them as well as each other. We also validate our observations/assessments with each other all the time. As a Flight Nurse I know that our Medics are woefully underpaid in respect to their skills and duties. However our AirMedical program is a non-traditional one in that our pilots and medics are employees of a free standing ground and HEMS service and the nurses are employed by the associated hospital in a joint venture service. A little out of the norm , but the set-up serves us well.


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