Young, New Nurse with CNA problems

  1. 0
    I just graduated from school in may and got my license in June of last year, I also just turned 21 in October. I work at a skilled nursing facility and have been working there since September. I have the problem of working with CNAs that are mostly older than me, so therefore a lot of them don't respect me. I ask them do to things (not all the time) that are with in their scope, I help out when I'm able, and I always try to be nice to everyone and have a smile on my face. Problem is that I feel like they don't have respect for me not want to listen to me, also have one that is an agency hired aide that gives me an attitude and talks behind my back 99% of the time she works. I'm just sick of it and don't know what to do. I just feel that those that give me problems (not anything I can report them for) don't take me seriously because I'm so young. What can I do? Are there other young nurses that have this problem???
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Maybe ur being too nice, in a good manner ,but firmly inform them of the tasks u assign . For example instead of saying " Can you please, .... say something like " Hi, Lindsey I'm going to need for you to do ... by and give the time you need to have the task completed.You have your own tasks and MGMT . I'm just a nursing Student ,but I work in an enviroment , where some of my co-workers have 10 or 13 years of experience, but sometimes I'm assigned special projects to lead. I have a great relationship with everyone, but the time of buis. is that .... business... and then sometimes there isn't much you can do.... I mean if it gets to the point ... u no longer love ur work enviroment.. and feel the issue is non-existant with MGMT, u may try to go somewhere else... BESt of Luck to u
  5. 0
    Chances are, "troublesome" staff are not just that way towards you... this is a behavioral pattern that has been allowed to continue. Other staff are watching to see what, if anything, you will do. If 'she' gets by with it, then that is a clear signal that they can do so also. Keep a record of specific instances.

    You need to have this conversation with your Manager. Discuss the specific instances of trouble with this CNA - this is much more effective than vague complaints. S/he can provide you with concrete support that you won't get merely from advice here on AN. If delegation techniques do not work, you will have to resort to formal disciplinary measures. Your manager can provide guidance - what exactly are you permitted to do? Do you need to refer problems to your manager or do you have authority to take action? What type of action?
  6. 1
    Quote from ddd2012
    I just graduated from school in may and got my license in June of last year, I also just turned 21 in October. I work at a skilled nursing facility and have been working there since September. I have the problem of working with CNAs that are mostly older than me, so therefore a lot of them don't respect me. I ask them do to things (not all the time) that are with in their scope, I help out when I'm able, and I always try to be nice to everyone and have a smile on my face. Problem is that I feel like they don't have respect for me not want to listen to me, also have one that is an agency hired aide that gives me an attitude and talks behind my back 99% of the time she works. I'm just sick of it and don't know what to do. I just feel that those that give me problems (not anything I can report them for) don't take me seriously because I'm so young. What can I do? Are there other young nurses that have this problem???
    Hey,
    i worked as a cna before becoming a nurse and i must say from experience. It's really not about your age. Its a much more about your character and soft attitude. Nursing is all about kindness, compassion etc but you also need to be strong and assertive esp working in a area full of estrogen(more women on the floor). Let the cna know what you need them to do and always make them feel like you are always willing to help them with everything you delegate , baths , bedmaking , ambulation etc. yes i knw nurses got a lot of work as it is already, but cna s sometimes dont see all that. Some cna's feel invisible and underlooked, that their hardwork is not recognised or appreciated ... while others even think they r equivalent to a nurse ( but thats a whole different topic lol) . But the point is be respectful, straightforward and make them knw you are not afarid to get your hands soiled, and that they are part of your team, and you are there if they need you . You can also refer to your nursing notes on delegation tips or observe how other young but experienced nurses deal with delegating tasks. Goodluck
    turtlebob likes this.
  7. 0
    Look at it on a CNA perspective.

    1. You have to earn their respect. I agree thisdoll, it is not about the age. Respect is earn by proving to them your nursing knowledge. They might not went to nursing school but they have been doing this job for a long time. Respect is also earn by showing compassion to the residents. Most of the CNA genuinely care for the residents and they get very hostile if the nurse is just a "pill pusher" type.

    2. Since you are a new nurse, your CNA is picking up a lot of your slack. It is very challenging to follow a new nurse because old people do not take change very good. It's one of those personal touch the previous nurse does for them, so the CNA now have to spend extra time with them.

    3. Budget cuts. If a home is force to chose between a CNA and a nurse to hire, they will most likely hire a nurse. Most of the time the CNAs are running the behinds off. Put yourself in their shoes. resident Martha, Joe and Betty needs and wants to be toileted, they are all heavy to transfer and a nurse ask you (CNA) to walk Fred. That is too much. they don't exactly teach CNA critical thinking.

    My advice
    1. Know your residents routine. This helps cuts time passing meds and gives that personal touch
    2. If a resident ask you to toilet them and you know they are easy transfer do it yourself and instruct them to put the call light on.
    3. When you are asking for help make sure you ask them if they have time to help you.
    4. When you are delegating make sure the CNAs knows why you are delegating this task instead of you doing it yourself and why that task is more important than what they are currently doing. Example: CNA can you pls give this orange juice to Martha, her blood sugars are low. I have to take this BP meds to Fred because his BP is way to high and he might stroke out.

    I know you are overwhelmed with everything, but so are CNAs. In time they will respect you.
  8. 0
    This is a problem EVERYWHERE. CNA's feel that they're "too good" to do what they do. What I don't understand is that they're working as a CNA when they don't want to anything a CNA does. I get an attitude ALL THE TIME. And I know many other nurses who have the same exact problem with other CNA's.
  9. 0
    This is an interesting topic...

    Could it be that they are not satisfied with their own position in life? Seeing a successful young person in a more prestigious position might make them feel inadequate about their own position. Your success at a young age illuminates other's shortcomings.

    Or I've got it all wrong...


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