Still can't obtain employment at the hospital... been outta school for a month.

  1. 0
    I just got done the first year of my RN program (2 year program) at my college. I planned on trying to get hired at the local hospital where I did my clinical at since in my current situation (no car, and it's near me) it would be the best bet.

    Well, I applied and I have been following up with HR every week. They said it gets forwarded to the managers. I've also been keeping in touch with the managers. One manager told me to email her. I did so on Monday and I still haven't gotten a response.

    I also found out about a week after I applied that they do not take American Red Cross CPR certification and that was a hang-up on them interviewing me I guess. They take AHA CPR certification. I signed up for the AHA CPR class and I have it this Saturday. I personally think it's redundant, but I'm trying to do anything to get a summer/next year employment.

    They said after I get certified, I could drop off the card/letter of certification at HR. But I was also thinking of actually going to speak to managers of the respective floors in person. Should I do that and what should I say??

    I was thinking of just introducing myself and telling them what I've been telling them over the phone (that I'm a nursing student, did clinicals there, and that I'm really interested in the position and working there).

    Any other advice?
  2. 13 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    What's the difference between the two types of CPR certification to where it would even matter?
  4. 0
    Most hospitals want American Heart Association- Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers. Make sure you are signed up for the Healthcare Providers class.
  5. 1
    Quote from wannabanrnin2012
    What's the difference between the two types of CPR certification to where it would even matter?
    I think AHA's BLS is much more in-depth and advanced than the Red Cross. I believe that AHA's is geared more to the healthcare professional than the average person. If I were not involved in the healthcare field I would probably be just as happy to take a Red Cross class. I am yet to see a hospital want anything other than AHA BLS for their employees.
    Crux1024 likes this.
  6. 0
    ah. So the AHA CPR= BLS instead of just CPR like the ARC's?
  7. 3
    Quote from dmoney8827
    I just got done the first year of my RN program (2 year program) at my college. I planned on trying to get hired at the local hospital where I did my clinical at since in my current situation (no car, and it's near me) it would be the best bet.

    Well, I applied and I have been following up with HR every week. They said it gets forwarded to the managers. I've also been keeping in touch with the managers. One manager told me to email her. I did so on Monday and I still haven't gotten a response.

    I also found out about a week after I applied that they do not take American Red Cross CPR certification and that was a hang-up on them interviewing me I guess. They take AHA CPR certification. I signed up for the AHA CPR class and I have it this Saturday. I personally think it's redundant, but I'm trying to do anything to get a summer/next year employment.

    They said after I get certified, I could drop off the card/letter of certification at HR. But I was also thinking of actually going to speak to managers of the respective floors in person. Should I do that and what should I say??

    I was thinking of just introducing myself and telling them what I've been telling them over the phone (that I'm a nursing student, did clinicals there, and that I'm really interested in the position and working there).

    Any other advice?
    In the grand scheme of things one month for a job search ain't nothing.

    Just because *you* have plans it does not automatically follow employers are going to fall in line with them, so you'll have to develop patience.

    So far it sounds like you've done all you can for the moment, well that is outside of stalking the NMs. *LOL*

    IMHO I would take whatever papers/information requested to the HR department as requested. To me just showing up on a NM's floor unannounced and uninvited is just rude. I mean would you try to push your way into Bill Gate's offices , or whomever makes hiring decisions for a division of Microsoft you want to work in?

    More likely than not your main file is centrally located in the HR department where various departments or persons can find it if needed. Handing your information to a NM makes her/him now responsible for it's handling and or whereabouts (as if they didn't have enough on their plate already), and could result in it being lost/mislaid.

    Drop off the requested information, and make a note to whom it was given and so forth. Then send a quick and kind note to the NMs that requested you alert them when the thing was done.

    As tomorrow is the Friday before the long holiday weekend, I shouldn't be surprised if you hear anything back, even a confirmation of receipt until after Tuesday the earliest.

    Best of luck
  8. 0
    Yeah, going to see the NM directly without further notice does seem a bit rude. But yeah I questioned why I needed AHA cert when they're basically the same. And even though I applied, they re posted the positions back online.

    I'm just trying secure a job before it's too late. My next my final year will be in 3 mos and I won't have any relevant experience, plus I need something to pay the bills with. I need money lol.
  9. 0
    I wish you luck, I really do, and maybe you are in an area of the country where jobs are not impossible to come by. Here in South Florida I have several friends that graduated from school in Dec 2010, are pounding the pavement and have yet to find anything.

    And this a large metropolitian area. The market is tight now, pretty much nationwide.
    So if you get a job after a month, then... Mazel Tov...really, my hat will be off to you
    Good luck
  10. 0
    I too recently graduated with a two year nursing degree (RN program). However, the hospitals in my area are focusing on initially hiring the graduates with four year RN degrees. Various recruiters came to our school and encouraged all to make separate applications to each and every position of interest in the hospitals. I know of many students making 30-40 applications or more. So the nurse managers were overwelmed with applications. Bottom line is the nurse managers have had a lengthy process of prioritizing the BSN applicants only to discover they were no longer interested and took position elsewhere. The managers have had to thin out their applicants to get back to the two year applicants. Its not fair but that is what has been happening in my area. Don't give up.
  11. 0
    I'm not applying for an RN position.


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