Pretty bad at starting IV's - page 2

I am a new RN, just out of school, and have been off orientation for a few weeks. I am having trouble with starting IV's and find that I need help with about half of them. It is very frustrating... Read More

  1. Visit  NurseJessie2 profile page
    0
    Thank you guys so much for the advice. I know that I need to take my time looking for a good vein, but because Im working in the ER I feel like I need to be quick because most patients need fluids/ meds quickly. It seems the only ones I can get are the easy ones that pop right out at you lol. I am working again on friday and Im going to try to take my time with each one and have a little more confidence in myself. I am really trying not to get to upset because I really want this first year of nursing to be a big learning experience with my skills. Thanks guys!
  2. Visit  needshaldol profile page
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    You are correct; being in the ER may mean you have to act fast. Just keep at it and let the pros give you advice while you are doing it.
  3. Visit  anggelRN profile page
    1
    In my L&D we did 18 guages...all the time.

    I really like all the advice.Hereis the only thing I have to add. If you see a bifurcation in a vein(there's usually that hand one that comes straight down the ring finger and then forks into a "V"), always go in the middle of the "V", it''ll stabilize the vein and I have never missed that one.
    m1ckey likes this.
  4. Visit  needshaldol profile page
    1
    AnggelRN you are 100% correct. I teach all nurses to "look for the Y". I forgot to add that earlier post.
    m1ckey likes this.
  5. Visit  SaoirseRN profile page
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    Quote from NurseJessie2
    Thank you guys so much for the advice. I know that I need to take my time looking for a good vein, but because Im working in the ER I feel like I need to be quick because most patients need fluids/ meds quickly.!
    Think about it this way -- it's likely actually quicker for you to take some extra time, than it is to miss twice and have to go hunting for another nurse. As for the patients, I tell them "I like to look twice and poke once." This prevents them from taking my diligence for a lack of confidence.
  6. Visit  faithoRN profile page
    1
    One thing that really helped me when I was a new grad was to go to our hospital's ambulatory surgery center and start IV's for 1/2 a shift for a few days. Our ambulatory surgery center sees 40-50 patient's a day so I had a LOT of practice, it improved my confidence level quite a bit.
    m1ckey likes this.
  7. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    0
    Quote from One1
    You used bigger gages in L&D than in the ED?!
    Yes! 18 in l&d and unless we suspected blood products a 20 or 22.... Sometimes I think we are using something larger in l&d I swear I'm sticking people with blood donation straws!!!!!
  8. Visit  m1ckey profile page
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    Practice makes perfect! I'm also a new grad with 2 1/2 months of experience on a med-surg floor and my IV starts are always a hit or miss. Don't be discouraged and just do your best to find a vein. You have two chances, so why not use it, right? The ones that I don't always get are the elderly population. The one thing that my co-workers told me is to bend their arm and use the side of the forearm. Also, I read on this thread that they went to the surgery center to practice.. That is also a great way to boost the confidence. Our new grad residency program gave us a chance to practice our IV starts at the peri-op for 2 hours. It was definitely a fun experience.
  9. Visit  wish_me_luck profile page
    0
    I don't know if this helps, but it's something I made the mistake of once...once you get a flash, undo your tourniquet, otherwise you will blow it (with it still tied).
  10. Visit  SaoirseRN profile page
    0
    Quote from wish_me_luck
    I don't know if this helps, but it's something I made the mistake of once...once you get a flash, undo your tourniquet, otherwise you will blow it (with it still tied).
    Or use a manual BP cuff!
  11. Visit  One1 profile page
    0
    Quote from itsnowornever
    Yes! 18 in l&d and unless we suspected blood products a 20 or 22.... Sometimes I think we are using something larger in l&d I swear I'm sticking people with blood donation straws!!!!!
    Different ED, different culture I guess . We use 18s and 20s as standard (preferrably 18s though) and 22/24 only on children or the patient that is impossible to stick (eg a 22 in the thumb).
  12. Visit  amygarside profile page
    0
    Don't punish yourself too hard. It takes time to be an expert. We all have some weaknesses that we have to improve on. Just practice and just make sure you show your gratitude to the nurses that helped you with the task.
  13. Visit  needshaldol profile page
    0
    22 works just fine with blood. I prefer 22 unless the vein is very large; then I go for 20. Or if the person has thick skin a 20 is best.
    I worked in a clinic where I would put in maybe 6-8/day so I got good fast. Had no choice if I wanted the job. We did thinks there that are not used elsewhere from what I know. We would put on nitropaste over the vein area and put very warm/wet clothes. As said earlier, take your time and have everything you need all ready.

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