Opinions about transferring unit?

  1. 0 Hello there,

    Any opinions will be highly appreciated.
    I am a NEW GRADUATE RN. I got a job in PCU and my plan is to transfer to an ICU in the same hospital.
    My question is:
    - What is the appropriate time frame to transfer? I feel like it is bad to transfer as soon as possible after the unit takes me in as a new graduate and train me.
    - Are employers usually open to employee transfer to different unit for something I like or to gain more experience on other specialties?
    - Any suggestions on how to make the transfer that will not leave a bad impression on the manager as well as the unit.

    The manager knows I like ICU and he even asked if I applied to ICU position, which I did but I got this job offer first and accepted it. It is a great unit with lot of learning opportunities.
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  3. Visit  Candyn profile page

    About Candyn

    Joined Feb '12; Posts: 139; Likes: 39.

    14 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  wish_me_luck profile page
    0
    At my facility, I think you have to be in that unit for like 6 mo. to even be considered for transfer.
  5. Visit  calinurse11 profile page
    0
    My hospital requires 1 year, especially for new grads, you actually have to sign a contract to this effect so the unit who hired you gets their moneys worth.

    "Thou shalt not transfer until thou has reached 1 year"
  6. Visit  Candyn profile page
    0
    I do not have to sign a contract, but in all the new grad BSNs are enrolled into a 1 year residency program, so I think it is best to stay at least 1 year????????
  7. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    1
    Quote from candyn
    i do not have to sign a contract, but in all the new grad bsns are enrolled into a 1 year residency program, so i think it is best to stay at least 1 year????????
    am i correct in understanding that you haven't even started the job yet? then how do you know you won't absolutely love it? i think you're putting the cart before the horse, here. but yes, you should stay at least one year.
    kids likes this.
  8. Visit  Candyn profile page
    0
    Ruby Vee,

    Yes, I have not even started the job yet and I did not say I will not love it. I said "It is a great unit with lot of learning opportunities." I am just saying my dream job is a ICU position and asking for opinions on the length and how to make transfer best for the employer and unit

    Thanks,
  9. Visit  mrsrosstobe profile page
    0
    You should stay at least a year if that is the program length. You were honest about your interest so maybe once its getting close to a year you can start looking for ICU openings. Good luck with the new job!
    Last edit by mrsrosstobe on Mar 24, '12
  10. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    0
    Be careful of what you say when you do start work. You do not want to create bad opinions from the beginning by emphasizing your ICU desires too soon. If people develop bad opinions of you they might be able to thwart any future plans.
  11. Visit  Candyn profile page
    0
    Hi Caliotter3,
    Are you saying that it is not a good idea to let people know about my interest to transfer to an ICU? I want to be honest. I told the nurse manager that my interest is ICU, but I want to start with the unit to improve my skills and it is best for new grad to start in a step-down unit than right into a ICU. Is it a good way to say?
  12. Visit  Candyn profile page
    0
    By the way, I plan to stay at least 1 year or until I think I am ready for ICU, which will not be anywhere less than 1 year
  13. Visit  Candyn profile page
    0
    Can someone please answer my other questions? Really appreciate
  14. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    1
    Quote from candyn
    ruby vee,

    yes, i have not even started the job yet and i did not say i will not love it. i said "it is a great unit with lot of learning opportunities." i am just saying my dream job is a icu position and asking for opinions on the length and how to make transfer best for the employer and unit

    thanks,
    evidently you're missing my point. perhaps it's me, but i don't see how starting a job with the attitude that you're going to leave it at the first moment possible is going to make your time at that job as interesting, productive or as much of a learning opportunity as possible. you've already got one foot out the door.
    kids likes this.
  15. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    1
    Quote from candyn
    hello there,

    any opinions will be highly appreciated.
    i am a new graduate rn. i got a job in pcu and my plan is to transfer to an icu in the same hospital.
    my question is:
    - what is the appropriate time frame to transfer? i feel like it is bad to transfer as soon as possible after the unit takes me in as a new graduate and train me.
    - are employers usually open to employee transfer to different unit for something i like or to gain more experience on other specialties?
    - any suggestions on how to make the transfer that will not leave a bad impression on the manager as well as the unit.

    the manager knows i like icu and he even asked if i applied to icu position, which i did but i got this job offer first and accepted it. it is a great unit with lot of learning opportunities.
    the appropriate time frame to transfer is about two years. after the first unit takes you in as a new grad and trains you, they deserve to get the benefit of that training. it will be a full year before you're adequately trained and experienced and can start to really contribute to your unit. they deserve at least another full year.

    whether employers are open to transfers for the employees dream job varies. some are more open than others. if you've been a high maintenance employee they be anxious to get rid of you and actively push you to "follow your dream" to the icu. i'm assuming that's not what you're looking for. it will depend upon the staffing situation in both units at the time you're considering your transfer and how you distinguished yourself during your time on the first unit.

    if you work really hard and do a fabulous job your first year, then begin to take on more responsibility such as committees, precepting students or assistive personnel, etc. the second year, your nurse manager will be sorry to see you go, but she'll be happy to do you a good turn. when you reach that point in your relationship with your manager and having ascertained that there is an icu job open, go to your manager and tell her that it's your dream to work in icu and ask her how she'd go about achieving it. a manager who is on your side can greatly smooth the transition to another unit.
    kids likes this.


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