No Benefits not an option for new grads???

  1. Hi..I am a newly licensed RN and the facility that I am to start at tells me that the no benefits pay option is for experienced RN's only? Has anyone else heard of this?
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Yes, it is quite common. They know that you need to put in one year experience before you can go to work agency or PRN at any other places......so they can get by with paying you the lower amount.
    Don't worry..............it is only for a year and they are paying for all of your
    trianing.....
  4. by   Jennerizer
    Yes, same thing at my hospital. One year contract as a full-time employee. After that you can go prn or agency.
  5. by   renerian
    Pretty common

    renerian
  6. by   Ortho_RN
    At the hospital I work at, they allow you to take no benefits whenever you want... I just don't understand if you are working FT why you wouldn't want the benefits... I would like the extra money, but I want my sick pay and vacation time even more...
  7. by   psychomachia
    Quote from Ortho_RN
    At the hospital I work at, they allow you to take no benefits whenever you want... I just don't understand if you are working FT why you wouldn't want the benefits... I would like the extra money, but I want my sick pay and vacation time even more...
    Some people might have benefits from another job, or the spouse's job. I've never taken hospital benefits simply because my other job has the better (by far) of the two.

    And yes, the "one year of cheap labor" on the hospital's terms is pretty common.
  8. by   Ortho_RN
    Quote from psychomachia
    Some people might have benefits from another job, or the spouse's job. I've never taken hospital benefits simply because my other job has the better (by far) of the two.

    And yes, the "one year of cheap labor" on the hospital's terms is pretty common.
    Well I agree. My husbands insurance is 100x better and cheaper than the hospitals.. But at my hospital if you take no benefits.. You lose everything, no insurance, no vacation time, no sick time, etc... Now if I could have done a No insurance option and gotten the differential I would have...
  9. by   meesa214
    The staff who don't receive benefits in my hospital work either less than 20 hours per week, OR they are in the float pool (PRN). We require at least a years experience before joining the float pool because you never know what unit you are going to be pulled to. Sure you can request to stay on a particular unit, but it's not guaranteed.

    If you think about it, it makes sense. Why would the hospital want to use someone just out of school, with no REAL training? As PRN (or "no benefits") you don't get the luxury of being trained on the job. You're expected to know it.

    And benefits does not just include health insurance. You can waive that coverage if your spouse's is better and get a bit of a rebate (at least here you can). But why would you want to waive the vacation time, sick pay, tuition reimbursement, etc, etc, etc.
  10. by   orchid
    I do have benefits already and thats why I was inquiring about the no benefits option. It's not really that I want to be pool or PRN, but I heard there was usually a 'Full Time No Benefits' option or a 'Partial Benefits' option for people like me. I guess I will learn all about this stuff when I start working.

    Thanks everyone for answering.
  11. by   kbstudent
    Don't think of it as cheap labor. If you add in your benefit package (vacation time, sick time, retirement, life insurance, ED Leave, tuition aid) it is far from cheap.
  12. by   dphrn
    The last two places I interviewed at, "no benefits" offered $1.00 more an hour. What a joke! Prn is the way to go if you do not need the benefits. The hours always seem to be available.
  13. by   Gompers
    Are you sure by benefits they mean that you HAVE to pay for health insurance? Because here, for your first year you have to be at least 20 hours a week, preferably 40 if you're a new grad, for at least a year and then you can go float pool/prn and get no benefits like insurance or sick and vacation time. But even that first year when you work full or part time, you have a choice whether you want to pay for health insurance or not - it's not mandatory. Maybe by benefits they mean sick and vacation time, which you will automatically get if you work the required 20+ hours per week?

    Did that make any sense?
  14. by   suzanne4
    Orchid,
    Are you wanting the "no benefits" because of not wanting insurance?
    There is a big difference between the two. "No benefits" means no vacation pay, no sick pay if you have to call in, no disability insurance, if there is a tuition benefit you wouldn't be able to get that either. Medical insurance cna usually be taken or refused..........remember that you are paying the largest part of the insurance, not the hospital.............

    Hope that this attempts to clear up some misconceptions................

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