Fired from my first RN job after only 2 weeks. - page 4

I am a new grad who graduated this summer with my BSN. I was let go from my first nursing job only after 2 weeks. I graduated with honors and had my capstone in a busy Emergency Department. I started... Read More

  1. by   CindyFNP
    Apply for jobs at a teaching hospital. Even the ERs take new grads. I went into the ICU as a new grad years ago. Make sure you don't step on anyones toes. Nursing can get clique but if you don't make enemies and go out of your way to help your colleagues, they will back you up when you need it most. Good luck!
  2. by   klone
    Quote from Lil Nel
    Yes, an orientee has their own license. But during orientation, the orientee is operating under the license of the preceptor.
    No, she's not.
  3. by   AJJKRN
    Quote from Snowdin
    This seems like good advice, and I hate to sound naive, but why is this? I'm still a student nurse and still far off from getting my first nursing job, but I'm very curious about what you've said..
    Essentially because it tells your hiring manager that you already have one foot out the door. It may also hint to your peers that you're not going to be fully invested in them or the floor. The hiring and onboarding (training) process for the more reputable companies can be very expensive and is an investment that they would like their return on...a return they lose if the new hire leaves within the first year.

    Does this explanation make sense and cover your questions? :-)
  4. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Lil Nel
    Yes, an orientee has their own license. But during orientation, the orientee is operating under the license of the preceptor.

    My NM made this very clear just few weeks ago, when she sent out an e-mail discussing the importance of preceptors really teaching their orientees, and not just letting the orientee pick up the slack and do all the work.
    Did the manager actually specifically say that the orientees are operating under the preceptors license? If so, they either misspoke or misunderstood.

    Or, did the manager simply said that the preceptors need to actually participate and not just sit back and let the orientee figure it out themselves?

    The preceptor has a responsibility to make sure that their assigned patients are cared for, of course. They also have a responsibility to make sure they are actually teaching the person that they are supposed to be teaching. But everybody works under their own license and is responsible for the care that they provide.
  5. by   Workitinurfava
    If you were an EMT, surely you should be able to handle nursing. It is just a matter of what, and where. You should be able to apply to the ED without ICU experience. Are you burned out perhaps? Teaching hospitals are more forgiving of certain mistakes.
  6. by   countrynurse09
    Quote from TriciaJ
    And by the way, that manager was really insulting about LTC. It's incredibly arrogant to assert that XYZ nursing specialty doesn't require critical thinking skills. If it didn't require critical thinking, they wouldn't spend any money hiring nurses.
    LTC is HARD. You have many more patients and less help. On night shift as a new grad I had no one to consult unless I called a sleeping on call. So lots of critical thinking WAS required.
  7. by   TalleyGirl
    OP, my god I'm sorry this happened. I am not a nurse but a new grad X Ray Tech. I did clinical at a large hospital and I didn't like it very much. I asked lots of questions, made lots of mistakes as a student. Once I was done this last August I applied at several hospitals here in Chicago. One of the biggest once turned me down after an interview. And I am glad that they did. I rarely hear anything good from working at large corporate hospitals. All the x ray techs at my last clinical sight, hated working there and told us students not to apply. Many nurses we encountered were rude and stressed out. I don't like to say rude because they are probably dealing with the crap attitude you have been dealing with. It was just very stressful and unfriendly over all.
    Well, I applied at a very small community hospital here in the hood of Chicago's south west side. They gave me a chance, and I have been there now for 1 week. I LOVE IT! It's a close knit, friendly hospital. Everybody knows everybody and they are treating you like a family..no joke.
    It's not a Truma 1 hospital, but so what? Maybe I apply at one of the bigger once later. But at this small one I will gain lots of experience, and once I feel comfortable in myself and my knowledge , maybe I aim for something more challenging. Many of the x ray techs has been there for 30 + years and they still love it.

    If I were you, apply in a smaller hospital. Build up some confidence and experience and then apply at the bigger Trauma centers.
    Last edit by TalleyGirl on Nov 3
  8. by   Crush
    You were not there long enough to really say your worked there. I would not even list it on a resume.

    Totally agree with whoever said not to tell them you have plans to leave or go to another floor.

    Best wishes to you though.
  9. by   TalleyGirl
    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    Yeah...ok..
    Do you work at the place OP got fired from? Sound like it.
  10. by   elijahvegas
    Ill never understand how nurses can say to new nurses "you'll never be cut out for this" or something along those lines. like..who among us knew anything as a new grad, and what gives you the right to predict what type of nurse someone will be in the next 2, 5, 10 years to say that someone will NEVER get the hang of it?

    i can understand if we're talking about a nurse thats been working for 5 years and says something like "uh why cant we just fast push lasix?" maybe then ill think something along the lines of "yeah...i dont think you're cut out for this" but come on..statements like that are completely unneccesary and uncalled for
  11. by   Racer15
    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    Did you also walk barefoot in the snow, uphill both ways to school each day? Congrats, you were putting your patients at risk with only two weeks of orientation! No new nurse is ready to be on their own after two weeks! It's dangerous in my opinion. No new grad is ready to take their own assignment after two weeks. I don’t care how awesome you think you were back in the day, this kind of attitude is dangerous.
  12. by   Ben_Dover
    Quote from Mountainrnbsn
    I am a new grad who graduated this summer with my BSN. I was let go from my first nursing job only after 2 weeks. I graduated with honors and had my capstone in a busy Emergency Department....... I really am passionate about being in the ED nurse one day. I was an EMT/firefighter for 6 years before I went to nursing school. I'm not sure where I should go from here. I also moved to the city for this job. Any advice would be appreciated.

    I always say this --- that it doesn't really matter if you're a Straight Triple AAA student. Having a great common sense is also a big plus once you get into any field, well most especially "Nursing".

    They saw that you weren't a great fit and must have a great reason why they let you go.

    Look at it this way, they did you a favor before anything bad happens to your patients and your future. Be thankful and move on.

    Wish you the best of luck!
  13. by   3ringnursing
    You had quite the experience from hell. My God ... I'm so sorry for what you must endured.

    New grads need to be properly trained in the routine of bedside care - not spanked and told you'll never amount to anything. WTH? Where would we be if no one ever replaced those of us whom retire?

    We were taught the basic nuances and principles of nursing in nursing school - the real nursing experience begins on the job, and never ends until you finally retire. To get all that a proper orientation has to occur.

    I had 6 weeks of orientation in 1994, but my preceptor was there for me long after that ended. She answered questions, provided basic guidance, and was a sounding board for many of the complexities of the new career I was embarking on. She was wonderful, and she should ascended to sainthood. I loved her with all my heart, and was very grateful for everything she did for me. I still am, and remember her fondly.

    Take a deep breath, and start your job search afresh. There is a perfect place out there for you.

    You WILL learn, and you WILL do well! You will!

    Your enthusiasm says a lot. You seem willing to take constructive feed back and reorganize your professional actions accordingly (not everyone is). Bonus points in your favor.

    And in 20 years from now, when you are the nurse manager of your own unit, you will never, ever do this to a fresh, nervous new grad.

    Don't throw in the towel - who will be my nurse when I am old (older) and sick? We need new grads!

    You can, and will succeed. Now go show them all what you are made of my friend.

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    One more thing to consider: you made it through a rigorous nursing program, AND passed the NCLEX. Does this sound like someone who won't ever make it in a nursing job?

    Also, nursing is like a huge diamond (I've said this an awful lot lately) with many facets comprising the professional nursing field. To say you'll never make it anywhere is absolutely ludicrous. Don't listen to that garbage.
    Last edit by 3ringnursing on Nov 4

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