To all the newbie ER nurses out there... To all the newbie ER nurses out there... | allnurses

To all the newbie ER nurses out there...

  1. 3 I'd love to know what my fellow new grads have learned since becoming nurses. I'm a brand new RN and I've worked in a level 1 trauma center for 3 weeks now. Here are the most important things that I've learned so far: 1. Knowledge is your best weapon. 2. Manage your time carefully. 3. CYA. 4. Ask questions. Lots of questions. 5. Don't let yourself get pushed around. 6. Everything is different in the real world. What have you guys learned?
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  2. 39 Comments

  3. Visit  BrookeeLou_RN profile page
    #1 0
    Great to hear a new grad who is working..in ER even!!, sounds happy and has learned things in 3 weeks. I am proud of you.. You go Girl!!
  4. Visit  RNCEN profile page
    #2 6
    Looks like "she's" a guy.
  5. Visit  kyboyrn profile page
    #3 9
    Congratulations! I too started out as a new nurse in the emergency room about 6 years ago. I worked in a rural area ER, but we were a VERY busy rural ER. Actually, one of the busier ERs in my state. One thing I advise is to read, read, read. Learn as much about the more commonly used medications in your emergency room as you can. Pay attention to how each of your providers do things. What I've noticed is that each doctor or other provider have their usual way of treating specific types of complaints (chest pain, abdominal pain, stroke symptoms, etc.) If you learn how your provider thinks, it allows you to better anticipate orders and effectively manage your time. Learn to prioritize. As an emergency nurse, you have to work quickly, and you have to know the patients that require your immediate attention, and those that can wait. Sometimes this is tough, as I can remember one particular time that I had a baby that was near coding, a patient having an MI, a patient with acute pancreatitis, and another with severe abdominal pain, all at one time and they all showed up within 30 minutes of one another. This leads me to my next point: do not be afraid to ask for help. Nurses within a unit are a team, and there are times you or your fellow coworkers are going to be overwhelmed. Learn to help your co-workers so that they will respect you and want to help you as well. I do not care how great of an ER nurse you are, how fast you work, how intelligent, etc. you are going to need help sometimes. I will miss working as an ER nurse, but I'm still going to be in the unit. I recently graduated NP school after 5 years as a staff/lead nurse in the ER (my only nursing job) and I got a job in the same ER as an NP. I actually just passed boards 2 weeks ago and got my license a few days ago! Anyway, just remember that ER nursing can try your patience. It can break you down, chew you up, and spit you out. Still, it can also be very rewarding, as there are times that patients will really appreciate what you are doing, and you have the unique opportunity to be an integral part in the saving of many lives. Good luck in your career. Read, learn, write things down. In the ER, knowledge truly is power. Learn as much as you can. There are required certifications (ACLS, PALS, etc. varies by facility) but also go for extra emergency oriented certificaitons and classes if you get the chance. TNCC is a very useful class, and I wouldn't be surprisd if it wasn't a requirement for nurses in a Level 1 Trauma center like yours. I wish you nothing but the best, and wish me the same as I transition into the provider role. No matter what, I'll always be a nurse, and I'll never forget my days as a staff nurse, and as a lead nurse (I wouldn't want to do those days over again for anything, lol)
  6. Visit  EmergencyNrse profile page
    #4 7
    I have learned that if a patient goes "bad" to make sure your name isn't on the chart...



  7. Visit  PAERRN20 profile page
    #5 0
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    I have learned that if a patient goes "bad" to make sure your name isn't on the chart...



    So true...love the smiley
  8. Visit  anneuhbanana profile page
    #6 0
    Forgive me I am a newbie...but what does it mean when a patient goes "bad"?
  9. Visit  BrookeeLou_RN profile page
    #7 0
    Quote from Career Changes
    Looks like "she's" a guy.
    So sorry,, I do not even look and your name did not make me think..basically I did not think..No offense.. You Go Man!
  10. Visit  shieldanvil81 profile page
    #8 25
    Quote from nlmoore
    So sorry,, I do not even look and your name did not make me think..basically I did not think..No offense.. You Go Man!
    Hahaha that's ok, I know my name isn't very clear on that. I guess if I really cared about people knowing I was male, I'd have named myself RNhasapenis or ERmanlyb*lls or something. Thanks to you all for the replies, btw.
  11. Visit  noahsmama profile page
    #9 5
    Quote from shieldanvil81
    Hahaha that's ok, I know my name isn't very clear on that. I guess if I really cared about people knowing I was male, I'd have named myself RNhasapenis or ERmanlyb*lls or something. Thanks to you all for the replies, btw.
    Or, people could look at the little symbol next to the user name at the top of the post, which indicates if they are male or female -- right next to the little flag which shows which country they are from.

    Nah, on second thought -- a username like ERmanlyb*lls is a much more fun!
  12. Visit  FancypantsRN profile page
    #10 0
    Glad I found this post - I am not quite a newbie, but starting my first ER job next week! I am very excited, as I have wanted to work in the ER since in graduated nursing school 4 years ago. I am slow moving though haha, stayed put with CV step-down and PCU until now.
    I know one thing, I am as nervous as I was fresh out of school - but I look forward to the challenge! I am prepared for my whole "routine" to be turned upside down!
    Good luck to you newbie's in your learning!
  13. Visit  MECO28 profile page
    #11 2
    My vote is for "ERmanlyb*lls"! :spin: Congrats on your job!
  14. Visit  VICEDRN profile page
    how to start an iv while sweaty and on a screaming patient

    how to start an iv upside down...

    how to convince someone to look at my patient who is crumping

    what crumping means (and also what it looks like)

    the phone extension for security

    and when to call security...

    how to spot the fakers...

    how to fake out the fakers...

    how to develop a thick enough skin to be part of the most hated/complained about dept in the whole building...

    what nursing judgment means (and that's all i am gonna say)

    (been in the ER for 8 months and still love it!)

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