Should a new grad try ED or not? - page 2

Hi everyone, I just finished nursing school and studying for NCLEX while looking for a job at the same time. I interviewed at a hospital that has the largest number of ER patient intake in New Jersey. I was interested in the... Read More

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    Not in a busy Level 1 ER. The new grad that wants to work in the ER would do themselves the most benefit by working med/surg or on a tele floor for a year first.
    canoehead likes this.

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    I am a new grad adn have been working in a 34 bed ED as a tech for a year. I wanted to get an idea if I would have the confidence to be safe and competent before taking on the role as a nurse.
    I did accept a position and will start a 3 to 6 mo orientation hopefully in Feb. 13 weeks does not seem adequate for a new grad expected to take on more than 6 - 8 patients at a time. I would question their full expectations of you as a new grad and a tentative time frame they see you advancing at in the ED with a specific number of patient load. Remember how hard you have worked for your license.
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    Hey All
    I'm not an RN yet, finished this semester's finals today, 1 semester to go. Woo Hoo!!
    In my opinion new grads can work out in the ER with the proper support. I have been a Tech at a Big innercity level 1 for a year and a half now, and most of the new grads seem to really thrive.
    The orientation is 7 months and includes ACLS, PALS, TNCC and a couple other certs.

    Usually they pair new grads up so that 2 grads will work with one experienced preceptor.
    The patient loads can be up to 10 or 12 when it is busy, but the new grads will split that with the preceptor overseeing.
    Also they only hire new RNs who have some ER experience prior. It sure feels good to see my fellow techs graduate and do good.

    Granted there is a steep learning curve with a lot of stress, but everyone I have talked to is positive about the new grad program. This isn't the situation everywhere, but i figured I would throw my 2 cents in that it can work.
    Peace
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    Girl! Heck yeah, DO IT! If I could handle a frenetic environment and were twenty years younger, I'd go for it in a New York minute! God bless you in your decision....it will be right for you. Only you can decide what you can chew once it's biten off!
    Good luck...let us know what you decided and we're behind you 100 percent in whatever it is you want to try.
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    Good luck guys, be sure and buy some nursing liability insurance. When your working off your license, you'll see how much difference there is between being a tech in a busy ED and being an new grad RN.
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    11-12 patients per nurse is way too many. I would decline the position even though I've been a nurse for 17 years, and am currently in the ER.

    12-13 weeks is too short an orientation for a new grad IMO. Maybe OK for med/surg, but the ER has more new skills, and more variety to deal with.

    Go to a hospital that has taken new grads in the ER before, has 3-5 patients per nurse, and a consistent preceptor with a written plan. I think a level I trauma would be best because they get the scary cases every day, and you will learn quickly. They are also a teaching hospital, and will have staff that are used to helping the newbies along. Ask specifically about the staff during your interview- are they a cutthroat group, or supportive? ER can be trial by fire- you don't need extra flames from your coworkers.
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    Look into area teaching Hospitals like Hackensack, or Newark University, or NYC and see if any of them have a "New Grad ED internship". Most are some
    where in the area of 48wk precep programs. Learn while getting paid.
  8. 0
    I started in ER out of school. The first 3-4 months seemed overwhelming. After that the learning curve dropped a little bit at a time over the next two years. After 2 years I was completely comfortable. I stayed there 7 years, then went to PACU. However, I also work ER at a different hospital still.

    It's up to you. Not every unit or floor is for every person, only you know that.
  9. 0
    I started my career in the ER. After nine months, I asked for a transfer to med/surg. I realised my lack of expreience was putting my patients in danger. I will return to the ER in a few months with a solid background in patient care.
    It was a difficult decision. I loved every minute in the Er. It was a horrible way to start my career. I am only just now getting my confidence back.
  10. 0
    Quote from paphgrl
    I started my career in the ER. After nine months, I asked for a transfer to med/surg. I realised my lack of expreience was putting my patients in danger. I will return to the ER in a few months with a solid background in patient care.
    It was a difficult decision. I loved every minute in the Er. It was a horrible way to start my career. I am only just now getting my confidence back.
    I am sorry to hear that your experience was negative. I started a tech job a year ago to make sure that I would be able to handle the ER as a nurse. I know it won't be easy, but feel like I have a strong start with understanding the flow and staff. Only time will tell.


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