nurses and EMT's

  1. 0
    I'm currently an EMT, but I'm planning to apply to a master's entry program soon. From my own experiences, some of the ER nurses are disrespectful to EMT's. Some nurses don't appreciate the care EMT's give, although limited, in the pre-hospital setting. Sure, nurses are much more skilled and have more knowledge for patient care, but they should at least be polite and professional. I've been ignored and even called "nothing but taxi drivers" and it really upsets me, but I just laugh it off and act as if they were joking, even though they weren't. I find it ironic that some of these nurses treat us like this yet they wonder why some doctors do the same to them. At least I know how it feels so that I know not to do this when I become an NP.

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  2. 30 Comments...

  3. 1
    You've been watching all of this and you still want to be a nurse? Remember, it's still primarily a female occupation with it's inherent problems.
    SummitRN likes this.
  4. 0
    Try to remember that nurses are people with all the idiosyncrasies that go with that. Every one has a personality and not all of them are great ones. Keep your head up, you know you are more than a taxi driver. I used to work on a floor that was very intolerant of new employees, it didn't matter if they were a new nurse or a seasoned one. They didn't like anyone new and different. It was rather sad. Even though they for some reason decided to like me, I had to get out of there. Chin up and don't ever stoop to their level. Good luck!!
  5. 0
    You are not a taxi driver, you are a medical professional with skills and experience to take care of patients prehospital. Shame on them.
  6. 0
    What you are saying is very true. I am an RN who was an EMT first and I can tell you that RNs are very narrow minded about the EMT world even when you try and explain it to them.

    If it makes you feel any better, a doctor told me one time, "The problem is that no one likes more work and an EMT at the door really just means more work. And you guys know how they feel because think how the floor nurses react when you call report..." And it is true, whatever push back you get its because we are overwhelmed, underpaid and you just brought more work in the door. The floor nurses do the same to us.

    It's never appropriate to be offensive and rude. When I want to vent, I come here. I treat people at work professionally. Sorry some of my peers can't do the same.
  7. 2
    I am an EMT and will be graduating with my BSN in December. I think it is funny when EMTs get all worked about being called ambulance drivers when in the scheme of things that is basically all we are. EMS education is pathetic even at the paramedic level and Basic is barley more than a first responder. I have spent more time in Labs completing my prereqs for nursing school than my entire EMT program. When we have states that make taking a blood sugar outside of the scope of EMTs how can you expect to be looked at as anything more. I am in no way saying we should not respect EMTs, we have a very difficult job and sacrifice a lot but let's just be realistic about our role in health care. For pretty much any problem all we do is slap a NRB on and run lights and sirens to the ER.
    TraumaSurfer and SummitRN like this.
  8. 3
    Clearly, you are not a taxi driver. Taxi drivers get tips.

    Some people are jerks. Some jerks are nurses. Some nurses work in the ER. Nothing special about EMT's- A jerk is a jerk 24/7.

    Where I work, nurses and docs appreciate good pre-hospital care, and pay attention to report.
    SummitRN, Altra, and hiddencatRN like this.
  9. 2
    We have some EMTs/paramedics in our area that are excellent and for them I have the utmost respect.

    We also have some in our area that are not...and unfortunately these individuals bring down the group. It is unfair to judge all while just looking at these few, but it leads to some of the issues ER nurses have with EMTs and paramedics.

    Now, I don't mean to be rude with this, but part of it may be your attitude--saying that you will know what not to do when you "become an NP." This can be a bit off-putting to many staff nurses...almost as if you are putting yourself above them. One career path which I envision for myself is to become an NP, however I don't talk about this very often and I never phrase it as "when I am an NP." So, just be careful when you talk about this.

    Oh, and you are definitely more than a taxi driver.
    TraumaSurfer and hiddencatRN like this.
  10. 4
    An EMT could be a highschool dropout who went through a 2 week shake-and-bake EMT course, and is driving the dialysis van, and doesn't know what a fistula is.

    An EMT could have a BS in Biology, took a 180 hour EMT course, lots of CE, lots of experience, and is on a double-B rural 911 bus.

    The average ambulance EMT has a little college, took a 120 hour 1-semeter course, and is on a BLS IFT rig or an B-P rig.

    The ER RN experiences all of these EMTs.

    The ER RN could be a LPN who worked for 6 months and then got their ADN online.

    The ER RN could have a Masters in Exercise Physiology who then got their BSN, MSN/CNL, CEN, CCRN and has 20 years of ICU and ER experience.

    The EMT runs into both of these ER RNs and all those inbetween.

    Any one of the above examples could be a jerk, RN or EMT. It is important not to make assumptions.

    Yes, EMT education is little more than first-aid on steroids, which is why the EMT scope usually leaves little room for harm through innapropriate intervention except through gross malpractice. However, good prehospital treatment fixes problems and prevents future problems. A good RN appreciates this from an EMT and doesn't belittle anyone.

    -A new BSN RN with 8 years as an EMT.
    Last edit by SummitRN on Oct 25, '12
  11. 1
    EMS are crucial and I for one appreciate their profession. They are truly the front line, especially in trauma care. They often are placed in dangerous situations. In Canada, as I'm sure in the US, there are levels of EMS scope of practice. PCP (primary care paramedics) can do little hands on, not even an IV, but advanced care paramedics can start IVs and some can even intubate and do needle decompression. We are all the same team in the continuity of care. Now firefighters doing CPR, that's a different discussion lol.
    WhitneyTrenee likes this.


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