Is ER nursing Floor nursing??? - page 3

by zaga21 10,264 Views | 38 Comments

This may be a dumb question but is ER nursing considered to be floor nursing? Do you do as much of the not so pleasant codes, bringing food and other things I really don't like so much about floor nursing? What other areas are... Read More


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    ER nursing, aaaaaahhh, I miss those days. Is it like floor nursing? To a degree but then again, not at all. I agree that Jennifer and Jen2 have said it best. I have had varied and wide experiences working in the ER, some good and some not so good. I also agree with shadowing an ER, or other area, nurse for that matter. It would benefit you beyond belief.
    As for placing a foley when it isn't needed just as a convenience, think of how fragile that 80 year old hip fracture's skin is. Now is it a necessity or a convenience? I think it is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and it is convenient for the patient because he/she no longer needs to worry about PAIN when he/she needs to urinate. Not all hip fractures are surgically repaired. It is up to the surgeon and the patient or the patient's family regarding the treatment. So foley or no foley? I vote foley everytime because the patient will eventually get one in the OR if he/she makes it there or from the Ortho-Surgical floor nurse.
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    Hmmm, very interesting, I'm "just" a ward nurse intruding to add my two cents. The wards and ED are vastly different worlds and it takes different nursing skills and strengths to do both but why is that a bad thing and why do we need to demean what the others do????

    I can't stand this us versus them mentality!!! This ridiculous attitude that in my department we work harder and under more stress that anywhere else in the hospital and all the other are working against us to make our life more unbearable!!!! Come off it been up to a ward lately?! The patient acuity is higher than ever, it's not all about simple tasks like making cups of tea and "tucking people in" (did u really say that??).

    It takes all kinds of nurses!!!! I do believe that you should get a grounding in an area of general nursing first before moving into ED (I may now get lynched) otherwise you can become a jack of all trades and master of none. Sorry to offend.

    I fully appreciate how stressful and busy ED can be and trust me I try and get patients up ASAP and understand why things get missed or simply not done but it goes both ways how about a bit of understanding for the stressors I am under (we have codes/arrests on the wards too). Believe it or not the goal of my day is NOT to make yours hell!!!!

    Please don't demean ward nursing and what I love to do. I wouldn't work in ED for quids but don't trash what you do!!! Step out of your emergency world once in a while and come for a walk in mine maybe then you might all cut us some slack!
    murphyle likes this.
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    Quote from zaga21
    This may be a dumb question but is ER nursing considered to be floor nursing? Do you do as much of the not so pleasant codes, bringing food and other things I really don't like so much about floor nursing? What other areas are considered to be non floor nursing positions? Cath lab? Thanks for any input.
    My ER is considered Critical Care because we get a major amount of MI's coming in. I haven't exactly worked in the ER at my hospital, but I have many friends who have. They love it. They thrive on the busy moments. As with any nursing, there are the occassional need to deliver food or those little "accidents".

    I think it depends on what type of patient you want to work with. I know that I am not cut out to be a nurse that works in OB, pediatrics or cancer. Why? Because I had an experience in nursing school with a fetal demise and I decided I didn't want to deal with that if I could avoid it. With cancer, I found it depressing and I didn't handle that very well. I started in med-surg-urology and ended up in cardiac 2 years later. After 10 years of telemetry, I went to the cath lab. The difference between cath lab and the telemetry unit?

    The patients that are in for diagnostic purposes like heart caths are generally "walkie talkies" that are scared of what the results are going to be. They do not come to us with infections or the flu. They have to be well to have a catheter stuck in the heart (no fevers, no active infection, etc). The emeregency MI's, are fast and furious as we work to save their lives. The patients are sedated, but awake. They communicate. I love working with one patient at a time and being able to hold their hand and get them through the procedure. We do occassionally have to hold patients so long due to high census, so we do have the occassional trays and other things to deal with. It's not that I don't like working with patients on a nursing unit, I really did enjoy that, but after working on a unit for many years, I needed a change. The stress got to me. The cath lab is stressful at times, but I do only have to worry about one patient at a time. I really like giving one person all the attention.

    One person suggested shadowing other areas. That is an excellent idea. I think this could work for you. I always encourage shadowing somewhere if you are not sure where you want to be. This can heko clear up any questions about different units.
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    To ZAGA21:
    I am not trying to belittle you, but I am only responding to your own words.
    If you feel demeaned by passing out meal trays and wiping up stool, then get out of hospital nursing NOW.
    ER nurses are the first to see the patient; and they WILL be the ones to remove the encrusted dirt and maggots from a homeless patients wounds. There is NO clean area in nursing. There is only seeing what is, and intervening to to try to ensure a better outcome.
    Maybe you would be better off in a management position; I cannot say.
    But from your posts, I would think that maybe nursing is not the right fit for you at all.
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    [quote=ERRN I really don't understand why they care if they get a patient 30 minutes before the end of their shift, they only have to take vitals and tuck them in.

    I think all nurses should be required to float down to the ER to see what it is we really have to endure. Don't get me wrong, I love ER nursing, and wouldn't want to be a floor nurse, but some things need to be appreciated.[/quote]

    actually, there is a lot more involved in taking an admission than just taking vitals and tucking a pt. in. if i can't scramble and get it all done before oncoming shift gets there, then i am guaranteed a big ass fight about why i am not willing to stay for unpaid OT and finish and that is the same nurse i have to take report from when i come back. i really think that many ed nurses think that floor nurses are stupid and do not do bugger all. it reminds me of a statement made by an ed doc about how the ed is all that matters in the hospital. why, then, do pts need to be admitted? b/c they need a nurse to sit on their a**es and do nothing for them? no. b/c they need care. often time consuming and complex care. i know what it is that you have to endure- i have seen both sides. what i am amazed by is how quickly some ed nurses forget where they came from/forget the amount of intolerable BS on the floor that drove them out in the first place!
    other ed nurses on this board have cited belligerant/smelly/rude/demanding/litigious pts as a reason why ed work is so challenging and deserving of respect. forgetting completely that ed deals with said unpleasant pt for a shift, floors deal with that pt for days/weeks/months day in and out.
    whew. rant over. seriously though. we all deserve big props for what we do. the vast majority of us are hard working intelligent people who just want what is best for our pts. i'm sorry i got riled by what you posted.
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    :roll
    Quote from carlarn
    ER nursing, aaaaaahhh, I miss those days. Is it like floor nursing? To a degree but then again, not at all. I agree that Jennifer and Jen2 have said it best. I have had varied and wide experiences working in the ER, some good and some not so good. I also agree with shadowing an ER, or other area, nurse for that matter. It would benefit you beyond belief.
    As for placing a foley when it isn't needed just as a convenience, think of how fragile that 80 year old hip fracture's skin is. Now is it a necessity or a convenience? I think it is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and it is convenient for the patient because he/she no longer needs to worry about PAIN when he/she needs to urinate. Not all hip fractures are surgically repaired. It is up to the surgeon and the patient or the patient's family regarding the treatment. So foley or no foley? I vote foley everytime because the patient will eventually get one in the OR if he/she makes it there or from the Ortho-Surgical floor nurse.
    in the er it's
    a
    b
    c
    F... for foley!:spin:
    (true er nurse's get this!:roll )
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    Hi
    Can someone please tell me what causes a person to vomit faeces. I am not put off by BM or vomit having cleaned up quite a few people, maggots I don't know how I'd handle. I am just curious and have never been in a situation like that. Excuse my ignorance but I want to know. Please help.
  8. 0
    Quote from hassled
    Hi
    Can someone please tell me what causes a person to vomit faeces. I am not put off by BM or vomit having cleaned up quite a few people, maggots I don't know how I'd handle. I am just curious and have never been in a situation like that. Excuse my ignorance but I want to know. Please help.
    Large bowel obstruction.
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    To answer yoiur question..the ED is a mix of every kind of nursing..from bumps and bruises to massively critical..you get what comes through the door..and be ready for it.
    I read your reply also... and my gut tells me that you are either burnt out. looking for utopia..or should choose a whole other profession
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    "I really don't understand why they care if they get a patient 30 minutes before the end of their shift, they only have to take vitals and tuck them in."

    Simply tucking in a patient coming from the ER is just not the case. Not at the hospital where I work. Getting a patient from the ER means getting and documenting a complete health history and assessment, paging the doctor because the orders are incomplete, and at times having to re-starting an IV because the one that was started in the ER is not working. Many times the doctor will call and want thier patient ready for the OR "in 10 minutes" All of this, plus making sure your other 4 patients are "tucked in" with all of the meds given, pain managed, fluids running, TPN hung, and making sure all orders signed off and completed. There have been days that I ended up charting and caring for up to 8 patients because of discharges and new admits. Unless I get a really nice nurse who is willing to help me out at the beginning of thier shift, many times, getting a patient from the ER 30 minutes before shift change means that I will not be getting off until 9 PM.

    For me, it is isn't about who has the harder job, it's about working together to make sure the patient gets safe care. A patient who arrives on the floor 30 minutes before a shift change may not get the best care possible


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