Enraged (venting) - page 8

OK, I know y'all can relate... Tonight I received a 23yoM, out drinking and driving, hitting parked cars. He already has 2 felony DUI's on his records. He fought with fire department on scene... Read More

  1. by   tutored
    You physically defended yourself after first giving this bum several warnings and chances to ease off. You acted with compassion and grace, and he returned your kindness with physical abuse. You have every god-given right to do hit back. You honor yourself, and all nurses, with your actions. Don't beat yourself up (pardon the horrible pun) for this.
  2. by   Daywalker
    Quote from TrudyRN
    What do you do with them while waiting for them to chill?
    They go into the monitored seclusion room, with the cops stationed outside, and if we need to go in, we don't go alone.
  3. by   TrudyRN
    [quote=tddowney;1981296]
    Quote from TrudyRN

    The trouble with pepper spray is that it affects just about everyone in the room, and depending on the ventilation in other rooms as well.

    I've been exposed only once, and that was outside, about 20' from the source, on a day with a very light variable breeze. The spray was acutally aimed in the other direction. Within seconds my eyes were burning and effusively tearing, and I was experiencing difficulty breathing.

    Used in a confined area, the OP would have been as incapacitated as the Pt. The ER would have been left shortstaffed in addition to the problem of treating the OP and Pt for the effects of the spray.

    In that situation, I think pepper spray would have been worse than what the OP actually did.
    Tazer
  4. by   Dalzac
    in our ER if the pt. is abusive and violent and slugging nurses and if there is no apparent injury, the doc will refuse treatment and give him to the cops and that's it.
    but if the doc is truly concerned then he is paralyzed and intubated.
  5. by   imenid37
    I think the OP did the best they could. If any one of us had been punched we may well have acted instinctively. This man was violent and out of control. I think those of us who don't do ED should remember the conditions under which our collegues who have to work.
  6. by   melpn
    You lost your cool w/ a drunk selfish jerk who has no regard for anyone's life, even those who are trying to take care of his sorry @#%. You put up w/ way more than I would have. The doc should have tubed him a long time before it got to that. Why is it that we have to put up with this abuse and assault just because we are nurses? Don't admit to punching him; you pushed him away in self-defense. Try not to beat yourself up; there is only so much anyone can take. The fact that you feel bad about it speaks volumes about the type of caring person you are.
  7. by   veegeern
    To the OP: I am so sorry that you found yourself in this situation. You say that you lost your cool, but I say that you kept it. You did what you had to do to protect yourself and to make the pt let go of you. End of story. You did not beat, torture, mutilate...out of anger. You did the right thing. Talk to a lawyer to find out how to put it in the right legal perspective. Seek counseling to deal with your feelings. Don't continue to be a victim.

    I was raised in martial arts. Dad, 2 uncles and 2 aunts are instructors. I was taught real world techniques and well as traditional arts for competition. I was also given a value system for using what I knew in the real world...defend others, defend self, and defend country. I also took self defense classes in college for my physical edu. hours. That said...if I'm being assaulted, I'm not going to be thinking about my license. AND if I am successful and have my health when it's over, they can have my license if they want it...after a fight of course.
  8. by   bradleau
    Talk about safety. Our place of employment has put our medicine scanners and computers in the patient rooms. We are supposed to do our charting at bedside,too. Some of these have been placed in such a way that I would have to crawl over family members and could easily be trapped in the room. Just recently I felt lucky that I had the bed between me and a "walkie Talkie" patient. He lunged at me, then laughed. Of course my department head gave lip service to "we want you to stay safe and not get hurt"...so now what to do. I know what I will be doing. At least in regards to charting. We are too short staffed to stay in patient rooms. Try phoning the desk at 12:20 AM ....it may get answered after 20 rings. That is because all of us are in patient rooms. No unit secretary after 11 PM.
    We have 28 patient maximum including 4 camera rooms for "confused" patients and one airborne isolation room. This leads to an average of 6-7 patients a piece. SO YOU CAN SEE WE WILL NOT BE OUT AT THE DESK.
    I asked why this decision was not made with our input. The answer was that (for 2 years) we had negative comments about the current method, so Corperate ( note that word) made this decision...of course none of them work at bedside. I am glad that most of the time we are reasonably safe on a med surg floor. But we get the ETOH and other drug abuse pts as well. I am glad you filed charges. Now just how much will your place of employment back you up? You did say his "daddy" was a lawyer. Take care.
  9. by   Spritenurse1210
    Quote from andhow5
    OK, I know y'all can relate...


    I lost my cool at that point and completely lost it. I'm ashamed to admit that without thinking, and in order to get away, I punched him very hard and quick 3 times in the chest so he would let go of my other arm (and it worked).

    The police were all over him like a cheap suit. I told him that we were done playing the easy way, and he would now be going down the hard road, and told him I was taking him back to the ER to paralyze and intubate him.

    He cried all the way back.


    Any tips for calming down?
    1. he's a p****.
    2. you're human.
    3. you had witnesses.
    4. he was a drunk a***** nothing more nothing less.

    i know it's hard, but take a few deep breaths, a nice hot bath, and talk to someone you trust about the incident
  10. by   NurseKymba
    OP, I hope you are alright .... after being assaulted by a patient I had to take time off to consider my career choices. As already stated, we get into nursing to make a living and to make a difference - being physically violated can make us reconsider what we are doing and what we will do in future.

    I've pressed charges, and have encouraged other nurses to do the same. but we have never had to appear in court - some never made it that far, some were blocked by my former employers, some just pled out. Yeah, I worked in a violent city's ER. Through all of this we slowly worked out new policies that protected our staff, patients and visitors. Quite time consuming, but totally worth it.

    Our DA now understand the problem and is working with local healthcare providers - nurses have died at the hands of patients and visitors in the US. Not a lot ... but even one is too many.

    (Here's a link to one small article I found online: Nurse's death prompts call for protection Nursing - Find Articles)

    I wonder how HIPPA would affect our ability to press charges against violent patients? Would we then get into 'trouble' for talking about them on a public record?

    And may we all stay safe in our violent world .....:smilecoffeecup:
  11. by   teeituptom
    Golfing always calms me down
  12. by   veegeern
    Quote from NMSANE
    Our DA now understand the problem and is working with local healthcare providers - nurses have died at the hands of patients and visitors in the US. Not a lot ... but even one is too many.

    (Here's a link to one small article I found online: Nurse's death prompts call for protection Nursing - Find Articles)
    Funny how we never see things like this in the national news. As opposed to nurses that kill their patients...
  13. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from veegeern
    Funny how we never see things like this in the national news. As opposed to nurses that kill their patients...
    You know, that's very true. Almost like it'd give the facility a bad name, so it's OK to sweep it under the rug.

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