Does ED have a bad rep for mean nurses? - page 5

I was perusing the posts and this question came to mind. I have worked several different units but my short stay in the ER showed me some of the meanest, bitter, most unhappy RN's I've ever met. Most... Read More

  1. by   LeahJet
    Quote from noelle4
    Hey LearJet or whatever your name is...what IS your problem anyway? You sound jealous
    Your posts here reveal why you flopped in the ER.... or with the staff at least.
    The sad part is, you don't even realize what you are doing.

    I wish you luck and patient co-workers.
    Last edit by LeahJet on Sep 18, '06
  2. by   noelle4
    Quote from ruby vee
    that and the attitude that the er nurses were "old dinosaurs who shouldn't be allowed to call the shots anymore." nevermind that she couldn't get along with them because they were threatened by her beauty.

    i think noell needs to take a good, long look at her part in her interactions in the er. but i don't think she's ready yet.
    ruby! you're the lucky winner of my closing post-congratulations!

    i refer to them as old dinosaurs b/c they are old dinosaurs ...old veterans who are so burnt out and have been doing the nursing thing for so long they act like they hate it!! the type no one likes to be around b/c of their negative vibes all day, who tries to bully new staff and even the manager--the type who complains about everything new, talks about how stupid the new med students/residents/attendings are, balks at change, tries to "play" manager when in fact they are not in a management position. rn's like this need to either quit nursing or actually do something about changing things and go into administration or something. very different from the mature nurses who i admire and look up to.
    taking a look at my part in these interactions--i did nothing but treat these people with common courtesy and kindness. i held my dignity at all times, never got down to their level.

    another thing ruby? try to stop fixating on my "beauty":wink2: . since when is attractiveness such a taboo subject anyway? i assumed we were all mature adults in here, and you missed my main point.
    yes, i am a beautiful person, inside and out.
    obviously i was too controversial to post on a site such as this, and i won't do it again. i wonder if i had stated instead that i was unnattractive, would i have garnered more support in here?? sad, sad, sad. women need to stop fighting each other...
    ok-last word: mean nurses--you know who you are ! recognize yourselves, stop bullying, stop ******** -do something constructive about it. if i help one nurse from going thru what i did, well, then my job is done.
    peace and love all.
    noelle
  3. by   noelle4
    Quote from LeahJet
    Your posts here reveal why you flopped in the ER.... or with the staff at least.
    The sad part is, you don't even realize what you are doing.

    I wish you luck and patient co-workers.

    You missed your calling. You should be practicing psychology
  4. by   Meerkat
    I haven't read all the posts, but in my experience ED does have a rep for mean nurses. In fact, RN magazine had an article on it.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Meerkat
    I haven't read all the posts, but in my experience ED does have a rep for mean nurses. In fact, RN magazine had an article on it.
    Would you mind finding it and linking it? Thanks!


    steph
  6. by   Meerkat
    Quote from stevielynn
    Would you mind finding it and linking it? Thanks!


    steph

    I'll try to...it was a few years ago. Be right back
  7. by   neneRN
    Quote from LeahJet
    Your posts here reveal why you flopped in the ER.... or with the staff at least.
    The sad part is, you don't even realize what you are doing.

    I wish you luck and patient co-workers.


    Exactly. Let me preface this post by saying that I am not trying to incite or belittle the OP. The best advice I can give is to stop and carefully read all these responses to the original question. The nurses on this board are generally here to support and educate others; I don't think many post with the intent to hurt feelings. That in mind, take a second look at what the experienced nurses are trying to tell you. Your posts make you seem like someone who is difficult to get along with; someone who is very resistant to criticism--although I'm sure you don't want to be thought of like that, that is how you are coming across to others here and most likely to those who worked with you in the ER. It can be very hard to hear the truth and easy to respond to those truths by becoming defensive and attacking others. If so many posters are agreeing on their opinion of you, then its time for you to take a good look in the mirror and try to understand why that is.

    Think of it like this, if you took a poll about anything in the world, and you came up with 9 out of 10 people believing the same thing, you'd probably have to say there's some credibility there with the majority, right?

    (I was just curious also as to how long you were in the ER?)
    Last edit by neneRN on Sep 18, '06
  8. by   Meerkat
    Halcomb,Lisa 10/31/01 (Sept.2001) Lyttle,Valerie RN, BSN, ONC,CEN. Why ED nurses have that attitude. RN Vol. 64,No.9 Pages 49-50.

    Valerie had worked on a variety of different units in her 16 year career, so moving to the emergency department in 1995 was not especially noteworthy to her, until a co-worker said to her "I suppose you'll develop that ED attitude".

    That ED attitude, Valerie has learned, means having a reputation for being aggressive, assertive, loud, demanding, tenacious, and bossy. ED nurses are frequently called chronic complainers and are also accused of not understanding the floors, the patients, or the families.

    Although Valerie does not excuse these behaviors, she does share some reasons why ED nurses behave the way they do. Besides their ability to treat emergency trauma, they are several types of nurses in one, such as a labor/delivery nurse, pediatric nurse, geriatric nurse as well as many others. They must move among all of their duties quickly and easily, turning from a critically injured child to a patient with a sprained ankle to a cardiac patient without skipping a beat.

    That's not the whole article, but it's the gist.
    Personally I don't think there's an excuse for nastiness. Nurses, no matter what specialty are professionals, and should behave accordingly.
  9. by   nuangel1
    :yeahthat:
    Quote from neneRN
    Exactly. Let me preface this post by saying that I am not trying to incite or belittle the OP. The best advice I can give is to stop and carefully read all these responses to the original question. The nurses on this board are generally here to support and educate others; I don't think many post with the intent to hurt feelings. That in mind, take a second look at what the experienced nurses are trying to tell you. Your posts make you seem like someone who is difficult to get along with; someone who is very resistant to criticism--although I'm sure you don't want to be thought of like that, that is how you are coming across to others here and most likely to those who worked with you in the ER. It can be very hard to hear the truth and easy to respond to those truths by becoming defensive and attacking others. If so many posters are agreeing on their opinion of you, then its time for you to take a good look in the mirror and try to understand why that is.

    Think of it like this, if you took a poll about anything in the world, and you came up with 9 out of 10 people believing the same thing, you'd probably have to say there's some credibility there with the majority, right?

    (I was just curious also as to how long you were in the ER?)
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Meerkat
    Halcomb,Lisa 10/31/01 (Sept.2001) Lyttle,Valerie RN, BSN, ONC,CEN. Why ED nurses have that attitude. RN Vol. 64,No.9 Pages 49-50.

    Valerie had worked on a variety of different units in her 16 year career, so moving to the emergency department in 1995 was not especially noteworthy to her, until a co-worker said to her "I suppose you'll develop that ED attitude".

    That ED attitude, Valerie has learned, means having a reputation for being aggressive, assertive, loud, demanding, tenacious, and bossy. ED nurses are frequently called chronic complainers and are also accused of not understanding the floors, the patients, or the families.

    Although Valerie does not excuse these behaviors, she does share some reasons why ED nurses behave the way they do. Besides their ability to treat emergency trauma, they are several types of nurses in one, such as a labor/delivery nurse, pediatric nurse, geriatric nurse as well as many others. They must move among all of their duties quickly and easily, turning from a critically injured child to a patient with a sprained ankle to a cardiac patient without skipping a beat.

    That's not the whole article, but it's the gist.
    Personally I don't think there's an excuse for nastiness. Nurses, no matter what specialty are professionals, and should behave accordingly.

    Thank you.

    I'm not sure that being "aggressive, assertive, loud, demanding, tenacious, and bossy" equals being mean though.

    And I'm none of the above and work in the ER.

    steph
  11. by   nuangel1
    i am assertive and tenacious when the situation requires but that doesn't make me mean.
  12. by   LeahJet
    I think therein lies the problem. Many people equate assertiveness with "mean". Just as assertive women are called the "B" word.
  13. by   traumaRUs
    Being assertive isn't "bad." It just means that you get the job done. This is a good thread but we need to be carefule to debate the subject - Are ER nurses mean? - versus other posters.

    Thanks everyone.

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