benadryl inj, in anaphylaptic shock? - page 2

by 7feetunder

4,542 Views | 19 Comments

​tell me everything you knew about it.. because i never know benadryl inj is exist.:unsure: thank you. leesha... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from samadams8
    ^ This.

    Really. OP never heard of diphenhydramine injectable?

    It can also work like an antiemetic too--though there are better ones out there.


    I like LexiComp, but I think it ended up being more expensive than Epocrates.
    The original poster is from Malaysia. Apparently parenteral diphenhydramine HCl is not available in Malaysia. (per OP's later posts it is only available in liquid/syrup form and not as a tablet or cream either like it is in the US, Canada and other countries)
    Esme12 likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from Meriwhen
    I didn't until I started nursing school...and even then, I didn't actually encounter the IM version until I started working. Also, depending on the country that he/she lives in, it may not be used in lieu of other medications.
    Oh OK. I have also given it IV.

    Yes. I am sure that other countries do not see everything we have or give.

  3. 0
    Quote from KatieMI
    It is not a first-choice, first-line med but it exists and sometimes used.
    The problem is, benadryl works really slow comparing with tempo of anaphylaxis. The start of action is expected, under normal circumstances, within 15-20 min., and the patient can die well before this time passes. Also, benadryl, especially given IV, can cause hypotension, doesn't directly treat bronchospasm and its sedative effect may not be desirable.

    I carry benadryl SL pills and SQ auto-injector (the latter thing isn't available in the USA so I buy it in Europe) in my "allergy pack" with total dose 200 mg. I use them only for local and less severe reactions. Paramedics and ER personnel usually inject it later, IV or SQ, but only after blood pressure is under good control.
    I worked the ED for years and gave more Benadryl for allergic rx's then epi.
  4. 0
    Name:  Diphenhydramine_Anaphylaxis.png
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    We kept it in stock for immunization clinics at my previous place of employment. The Colorado Immunization Manual lists in Section 4, p.4-5 the appropriate syringes, needles, & dosage (by body weight or age if weight unknown): Disease Control and Environmental Epidemiology - Colorado Immunization Manual (CIM)
  5. 0
    Quote from KatieMI
    It is not a first-choice, first-line med but it exists and sometimes used.
    The problem is, benadryl works really slow comparing with tempo of anaphylaxis. The start of action is expected, under normal circumstances, within 15-20 min., and the patient can die well before this time passes. Also, benadryl, especially given IV, can cause hypotension, doesn't directly treat bronchospasm and its sedative effect may not be desirable.

    I carry benadryl SL pills and SQ auto-injector (the latter thing isn't available in the USA so I buy it in Europe) in my "allergy pack" with total dose 200 mg. I use them only for local and less severe reactions. Paramedics and ER personnel usually inject it later, IV or SQ, but only after blood pressure is under good control.

    thanx a lot!!
    its a new input formy brain :P
  6. 0
    Quote from JustBeachyNurse
    The original poster is from Malaysia. Apparently parenteral diphenhydramine HCl is not available in Malaysia. (per OP's later posts it is only available in liquid/syrup form and not as a tablet or cream either like it is in the US, Canada and other countries)
    Thanx for answering on be half of me.Even pcm injection is not available in Malaysia..
    No hurtfeelings .Even this drugs not prescribed in my country but I just want to know because I want to..who knows someone from your country come to our center and asking for inj.Benadryl?
    Now I knew that it is only available at your country and I will give him a perfect answer for that..
    Last edit by 7feetunder on Sep 12, '12
  7. 0
    Yes, because not every anaphylaxis worths epi, thanks God. Also, nowadays epi is more commonly injected by the patient or paramedics before coming into ER.
    Epinephrine is actually injected more commonly than necessary; in my support club I'd seen parents who gave their kids a shot "just in case" after noticing something which might contain the allergen literally half a mile away or after a single peanut was found on school bus floor.
  8. 1
    Quote from KatieMI
    It is not a first-choice, first-line med but it exists and sometimes used.
    It's part of our standard anaphylaxis kit: we give IM epi, IV benadryl and solumedrol, and IV zantac after the previous 3 are in.
    7feetunder likes this.
  9. 0
    It also makes a great local topical anesthetic in a pinch
  10. 0
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    It's part of our standard anaphylaxis kit: we give IM epi, IV benadryl and solumedrol, and IV zantac after the previous 3 are in.
    Same in our ER.


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