Angry mom treated rotten in ER today - page 6

I just am not sure what to do. I'm sure if i call the hospital tomorrow to complain i'll get transferred here and there and finally to an answering machine or get hung up on or no one will return my... Read More

  1. by   nuangel1
    Quote from zoeboboey
    That's what I figured, that her condition worsened enough for you to feel she needed emergency treatment.

    Are you any more satisfied about how things went in the ER, now that you know it was just for the emergency, and you found out that yes, she was stable enough to go home?

    I do hope that they soon find out what to do with her. I know of women who have hysterectomies much earlier than 40 something - meanwhile, it seems that they gave her some good advice about diet and etc. She needs to get herself strong enough for IF she has to have surgery, or whatever.

    Now my advice to you is to do all you can to keep yourself strong and healthy, physically and emotionally. Then what mom is going thru won't seem as overwhelming. You DO have a lot on your plate!!!
    very welll said .i agree with you .purple princess take care.
  2. by   nuangel1
    Quote from lauralassie
    I feel bad for your mothers problems. I think the thing to rember is that if your mother is "stabel", then her problem is not concidered an emergency. Unfortunatley, many people are without adequate heath care coverage and resort to using the er as their Dr. That is why the er dc instructions say , if the problem continues fallow up with primary care etc.. I have to agree , I do not discriminate between medicade and insurance pt's . If the pt is an inapropriate admission the insurance co. will not pay the hospital either. If the pt doesn't meet admission criteria they can not be admitted. I also agree that if I gave every pt free meds, free gowns and blankets and taxi cab rides home ,the hospital would be in further financial problems. Pt's need to have a different view of the ER. If you know your mom is bleeding, take clothes with her to wear home or leave and bring some back. Don't expect free stuff, hospitals can't afford it. It's not that medical staff don't care they are just overwhelmed with pt's who are having the same problems. Granted the man doing the IV should have explained things, but stand up for yourself. If he didn't insist that someone explain. Don't just sit by. As an er nurse I find that there are many times I explain things to pt. they don't understand , don't bother to attempt to clarifie and are angry when we go ahead with procedures, when we are under the assumption they understand because they didn't ask further questions. I remember the good old days that we could do all kinds of things for pts. But those days are gone. I also remember when people only went to the er , dr etc.. when they really need to. (Your mother really needs a Dr.) It's amazing how many people go to the ER with colds, cough and fever with children that have not gotten tylenol or motrin.
    from a fellow er nurse well said.
  3. by   hispanicpanic
    I recently had to have a hysterectomy(uterus only) because of adenomyosis which caused me to go into hypovolemic shock. Though it can be a process if you contact your local county hospital they can direct you to their OBGYN clinic/ER for care. If your mother is truly saturating a pad or more an hour then her H/H should definitely be low enough to warrant an emergency hysterectomy or at least ablation. Good luck.
  4. by   Altra
    Quote from grannynurseretired
    Hate to tell you this but you are there for the convenience of the patient. The patient is not their for your convenience.

    Grannynurseretired
    Ah, but the ER is not about "convenience" at all ... or at least it should be. The ER is there to stabilize pts. experiencing a medical emergency.
  5. by   grannynurseretired
    Quote from zoeboboey
    Good points, Grannynurseretired!

    I guess they need to have more nurses, and more time to decompress. And we all (nurses) need more ed on compassion for those less fortunate, sophisticated, educated, American, or whatever. It is hard working in the ER -

    Patients need more education too on appropriate use of the ER - and I know that any of the insurance co's, whether private, HMO, Medicare, Medicaid, etc., do try to educate people on how to get care, who to call, what the ER and urgent care are for...

    I think it's good that this site is here to help nurses to blow off steam.

    I am really glad that you spoke up. And your ER sounds like it was a really interesting place!
    Kings County was a fun and exciting place to work. And we got plenty of different types of patients, including frequent flyers. I agree that people need more education as to the appropriate use of an ER. But until this country recognizes the need for universal health care, people will continue to use the ER as a personal physician because they have no other choice. Most people do not go to a ER by choice but because their health problem has become to unmanageable for them. And some return sicker because no one asked if they could really afford the prescriptions they received or if they had drug coverage. This is a good place to blow off steam but I get rather sick of the proprietary nature of some nurses concerning THEIR ERS. I worked for more then twenty five years as a nurse and have had unhappy, sometimes potentially unmanageable patients but unless physically threaten, I put up with a great deal. And tried hard to remember one thing "I was there for the patients, they were entitled to my respect and care, even if their complaint was for an in grown toenail.

    Grannynurse
  6. by   nuangel1
    Quote from grannynurseretired
    Kings County was a fun and exciting place to work. And we got plenty of different types of patients, including frequent flyers. I agree that people need more education as to the appropriate use of an ER. But until this country recognizes the need for universal health care, people will continue to use the ER as a personal physician because they have no other choice. Most people do not go to a ER by choice but because their health problem has become to unmanageable for them. And some return sicker because no one asked if they could really afford the prescriptions they received or if they had drug coverage. This is a good place to blow off steam but I get rather sick of the proprietary nature of some nurses concerning THEIR ERS. I worked for more then twenty five years as a nurse and have had unhappy, sometimes potentially unmanageable patients but unless physically threaten, I put up with a great deal. And tried hard to remember one thing "I was there for the patients, they were entitled to my respect and care, even if their complaint was for an in grown toenail.

    Grannynurse
    while yes it is a general sx of our healthcare system.alot of times it is the pcp that sends them .i also agree we wouldn't have a job without pts.however i am there to take care of pt stabilize and either admit or d/c pt not for the pts convenience.also while the pts should be treated with respect so should the staff.as ed nurse i have been verbally physically and psychologically abused .it is part of the job sometimes.i have been a nurse 20 yrs in icu pacu er etc i have always taken good care of my pts .while a pt has a right ,as long as competent,to refuse a staff member or a treatment ,no one not even you have the right to be abusive to staff.you don't like the care leave it is your right .and until you walk in my shoes you can't and shouldn't judge my practice.ps if pt comes in for a non lifethreatening problem ,regardless of reason they cane to ed,that person needs to understand they will have a longer wait .the lifethreatening situations will and should come first.
    Last edit by nuangel1 on Jan 22, '07
  7. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from grannynurseretired
    Unfortunately, for the uninsured, poor and even middle class, the ER is often their only source of medical treatment. And in many communities, physicians will not accept new patients without insurance or the money to pay their fees at the time of the visit. So, the comments regarding the purpose of ERs is moot. I worked in one of this countries largest ERs---Kings County, Brooklyn. We saw a large number of chronic problems as well as Level One traumas. And we treated everyone, making no distinction between chronic or acute, unless you were actively bleeding, in acute respiratory distress, suffering from chest pain. I am so tired of hearing nurses complain about people cluttering up THEIR ER, with their non-emergency problems. The 'purple princess' felt the extent of her mother's bleeding was an emergency, even when some do not believe it was. Hate to tell you this but you are there for the convenience of the patient. The patient is not their for your convenience.

    Grannynurseretired
    THANK you! My sister, who is uninsured, was basically treated like crap in the ER of a local hospital back in July of 2005. She had been experiencing lower abdominal pain and hematuria for weeks, and had no other place to go for treatment. They ran tests and told her and my BIL that "they both had STD and for them to go home and take precautions". Huh??? She found out from her PCP 24 hours later that she had a malignant tumor on her bladder instead and was immediately scheduled for surgery....at another hospital.

    How in the world can you be diagnosed with STD one day and bladder cancer the next?? You CAN'T. :angryfire
  8. by   gwenith
    Closed for moderator action
  9. by   nuangel1
    i am sorry your sister got misdiagnosed .however not all eds are the same.yes mistakes are made .staff are human too.i hope your sister filed a complaint as she should.i also hope your sister is ok now.
  10. by   canoehead
    If someone has had the same problem for several weeks it isn't an emergency, perhaps they were unable to make another appt, but still, not an emergency. We will be happy to see them, but there will be a wait. Of course everyone deserves and should get respect, and excellent accurate nursing care regardless of insurance, race, chief complaint or any other factor. Perhaps we all disagree on what is said AFTER the patient leaves. People need to vent whether it's politically correct or not. I admit a lack of saintliness on my part, but having vented to my coworkers I can start over and do a better job for the next person. I get cranky and inappropriate when I can't vent, or there is too much to do in to little time, or (the worst) when I can't give each patient the attention they deserve.
    Last edit by canoehead on Jul 14, '07
  11. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from charebec65
    she put me onto a state program for the working poor that didn't have access to insurance (that the medicaid worker should have told me about). I don't remember her name but this was at St. Agnes Hospital in Baltimore and I'll never forget how wonderful she was to us.

    That is too bad that no one helped you with that before... I don't understand that ... but thank God you got what you needed! How are you guys doing now?
  12. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from grannynurseretired
    And some return sicker because no one asked if they could really afford the prescriptions they received or if they had drug coverage.

    Or made sure they understood their discharge insts. These are also very good points!

    I wonder too, if patients are or can be referred to where they can reach social services for housing, food, medical needs, etc...

    I like your 'tude, Granny!
  13. by   LeahJet
    To say that we are a "convenience" to patients is insulting to every hard working ER nurse out there.

    It is the usually the type of sentiment that comes from someone not actively working in the ER. Either from non-nursing individuals, students, or people that have not been bedside in many many years.

    And yes, it is OUR ER. I have great pride in my work and where I work. Sorry if that offends anyone.

    I apologize for prior (now deleted by mods) posts in which I may have come down too hard on those that probably don't understand.

    I know that things have changed in the 10 years I have been a nurse. Sense of entitlement and the Customer Service trend have made a huge impact. This is not nursing in the 60's and 70's.
    Last edit by LeahJet on Jan 23, '07

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