DNP seems like a waste...

  1. 8
    Anyone else think the powers that be wasted a great opportunity with the DNP recommended curriculum? I seems to be mainly research focused, with little (if any) advanced clinical knowledge. What's the point? It would have been a wonderful way to increase the anemic clinical hours in NP programs (from 600ish to a more respectable 1500+). Thoughts?
    SweettartRN, BradS, NerdyNikki, and 5 others like this.
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  4. 12
    Its all about what looks good. To look more "professional".

    I have yet to see any evidence based research regarding higher education for NPs and improved patient care in terms of an NP role.

    Keep in mind Academia would also profit from a DNP program.
  5. 5
    It's just so frustrating. I want to be an NP yet I'm hesitant due to what seems like a complete lack of standards for this profession!
    SweettartRN, Agrippa, db2xs, and 2 others like this.
  6. 2
    Some schools did increase the clinical hours. My school increased the clinical requirements from 600ish (MSN) to 2000+ (DNP). What a difference that would make in new grads NPs from that school!
    SweettartRN and cruisin_woodward like this.
  7. 3
    There is that valid argument that the DNP is just a lame attempt to somehow justify nurses as being smart enough to get a doctorate degree. But alas, nobody gives a rat's behind about that even after you've chumped out all that time and money. Your are still ...a nurse.

    Chiros, Audiologists have developed a scheme to call themselves "doctor". The patients don't know they are not and assume they are MDs of some kind. It's too funny.

    Nurses who go the DNP route don't want to be called doctor - they don't (excepting the goofy ones, and there are always a few of those to make the fool of us all) Nurses just keep stabbing out in the dark trying to find a way to be taken seriously and to be respected. We haven't found a way to do that so, some just figure that some more "research" and paper writing years (LOL on the research, even MDs LOL on MD research - haha) will garner some kind of respect?!
    JuanMartin, dh07RN, and Szasz_is_Right like this.
  8. 8
    I'm just wondering if you all people with negative comments are NP. If you are then shame on you because no one look down on you as NP you are looking down on yourself. However, if you aren't NP then you deserve to stay where you are because you aren't bright enough to respect your own kind let alone respect the profession. I have met NPs with DNPs and yes they feel respected in their profession. Some found they gain privilege after obtained DNP vs NP alone within their organization.
  9. 0
    Quote from IcySageNurse
    It's just so frustrating. I want to be an NP yet I'm hesitant due to what seems like a complete lack of standards for this profession!
    Yes and no. On the surface the difference between APRN programs seems staggering. At the core, almost all NPs take a national certification exam with pass rates in the 80-90% range. This is similar to the NCLEX exams for RN in terms of output. In addition, NP clinical outcomes have remained consistently high. Could the profession benefit from a more standard curriculum, sure.

    As far as the DNP, I have gone back for mine after a debate about PhD vs DNP route. I think, so far, it has helped my practice
  10. 2
    Quote from Born_2BRN
    I'm just wondering if you all people with negative comments are NP. If you are then shame on you because no one look down on you as NP you are looking down on yourself. However, if you aren't NP then you deserve to stay where you are because you aren't bright enough to respect your own kind let alone respect the profession. I have met NPs with DNPs and yes they feel respected in their profession. Some found they gain privilege after obtained DNP vs NP alone within their organization.
    What does "gain privilege" mean?
    sueboyd3 and Dazglue like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from netglow
    There is that valid argument that the DNP is just a lame attempt to somehow justify nurses as being smart enough to get a doctorate degree. But alas, nobody gives a rat's behind about that even after you've chumped out all that time and money. Your are still ...a nurse.

    Chiros, Audiologists have developed a scheme to call themselves "doctor". The patients don't know they are not and assume they are MDs of some kind. It's too funny.

    Nurses who go the DNP route don't want to be called doctor - they don't (excepting the goofy ones, and there are always a few of those to make the fool of us all) Nurses just keep stabbing out in the dark trying to find a way to be taken seriously and to be respected. We haven't found a way to do that so, some just figure that some more "research" and paper writing years (LOL on the research, even MDs LOL on MD research - haha) will garner some kind of respect?!
    There is no scheme involved. Pharmacists/PT/OT noted that they had increased their credit hours to a point that the hours did not match the degree. Now these healthcare professionals are getting a degree that correlates better to the amount of work they do in school. I don't know about where you work, but with the occasional exception of some chiropractors none of our non-physician/dentist/podiatry staff are using the title doctor when introducing themselves.

    By the way nurses are the most respected profession.http://www.angus-reid.com/wp-content...rofessions.pdf
    SnowShoeRN likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from FlorenceNtheMachine
    Some schools did increase the clinical hours. My school increased the clinical requirements from 600ish (MSN) to 2000+ (DNP). What a difference that would make in new grads NPs from that school!
    600 for an MSN? OMG. I had more than that for a BSN, and I wasn't being taught to diagnose or prescribe!


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