Constant fighting amongst caregivers

  1. I work in group homes and the pay is not good for nurses or caregivers. There is constant verbal wars amongst caregiver staff. The staff is constantly telling the house managers loudly that they are not going to do this, they are not going to do that because the pay is so low. They pay minimum wage. The caregivers are also always loudly verbally fighting with the other caregivers too. They never fire anyone no matter how bad they are. Is this how it is in most group homes?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   amoLucia
    Sounds like you work with lots of UAPs (unlicensed assistive personnel). For that extremely difficult client population, there usually is minimal education & training for minimal wages and other compensation for entry-level positions that may be union-protected with minimal disciplinary interventions.

    And some facilities staff with outside contracted care providers which can be a whole other problem.

    There are some good facilities, but it sounds like you're employed by one of the less-than stellar ones.

    You didn't ask but your options are:

    1) look for another position;

    2) float along in the system; or

    3) stay and try to improve the situation. In reality, this may be easier said than done and just not feasible if you are the 'lone voice in the wilderness'.

    Good luck.
  4. by   Blackcat99
    Thanks amoLucia. Yes, you are so right. I do work with a lot of UAPS and yes they are in the union. I think for now that I am going to float along in the system because the only other places in my area that are hiring right now are the nursing homes. Yes, I started out as "the lone voice" here and that is not working out for me.
  5. by   ceebeejay
    No, like all areas of life, there are good and bad. A lot has to do with how much they value respect and teamwork and promote that through policies and benefits. Look around. I found mine by world of mouth from parents I'd worked with in private duty.
  6. by   WineRN
    I am a community nurse and I am in charge over about 30 group homes currently.

    Most of our staff are DSPs, which like an UAP, they usually come to the position thinking it will be easy or like "baby sitting" and they have no formal training (it's exciting when they have a GED). We had a TON of conflict between staff members until the company changed how these issues are handled. Our house managers went through communication and conflict resolution training and staff was now able to be written up for not fulfilling the job description that they had to sign and agree too when hired. There was a few months where we were extremely short staffed but things are better now.

    I'm lucky enough to also teach some of the new hire courses where I am very blunt with what this position entails and I honestly end up scaring a few away with every class. But these people are linked to MY nursing licence, and I don't tolerate laziness.

    I never planned to be working with this population but I wouldn't trade it for a second
  7. by   dominiquejade
    I'm a relief staff in a group home, working part time while in nursing school; i can empathize. The thing about group homes, is that you have a lot of (UAP) females working together, essentially all with the main task of running a home. God knows we all run our homes differently, no necessarily that one way is better than another, and everyone wants to be top dog. Most waiver homes are state funded, so there's only so much room to increase hourly wages. The lower the wage, the lower skilled/quality workers are attracted, and this results in EXCESSIVE petty fighting, because trust me, I know this drama is everywhere, but I'm just outlining the reasons it's so out of control in the group homes. Unfortunately it takes away from the care of the residents. The residents are an already mentally draining population to work with, so the work drama just adds to the stress, and over morale continues to nose dive. It's a vicious cycle.
  8. by   Blackcat99
    Quote from WebbRN
    I am a community nurse and I am in charge over about 30 group homes currently.

    Most of our staff are DSPs, which like an UAP, they usually come to the position thinking it will be easy or like "baby sitting" and they have no formal training (it's exciting when they have a GED). We had a TON of conflict between staff members until the company changed how these issues are handled. Our house managers went through communication and conflict resolution training and staff was now able to be written up for not fulfilling the job description that they had to sign and agree too when hired. There was a few months where we were extremely short staffed but things are better now.

    I'm lucky enough to also teach some of the new hire courses where I am very blunt with what this position entails and I honestly end up scaring a few away with every class. But these people are linked to MY nursing licence, and I don't tolerate laziness.

    I never planned to be working with this population but I wouldn't trade it for a second
    WebbRN. I wanted to ask what can be done with caregivers who are late or calling off sick EVERY SINGLE DAY. They call in every weekend too. It's not a once in a while situation. Rather, it is a "WAY OF LIFE". Will the union still be able to save their jobs if they are late every day and or call in sick every weekend?. Thanks. What to do?
  9. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Blackcat99
    I work in group homes and the pay is not good for nurses or caregivers.
    I was a direct care worker for a group home at age 19 and 20, but left due to the very low pay of $8/hourly.

    Many of the caregivers are part of a 'forced workforce' of people who have been put to work by caseworkers due to participation in state-run welfare-to-workfare programs. MHMR group homes are one of the few remaining workplaces that will still employ people without a HS diploma or GED.

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