Adopting medically fragile infants

  1. 3
    I've spent thirty-three years adopting medically fragile babies and children. I love this work. I love my children, hate when they die, am blessed with them all my life. I choose my own work, for the most part, have no boss over my head, etc. Of course, there are the surgeries, etc. I have no time off, and no retirement, but I love my work. I've spent years suctioning, clapping, giving oxygen, tube-feeding, etc. I love nurturing. My most rewarding thing is knowing that each baby or child has love and a mother, besides the nursing care they need.

    I know many families who live this life style, but I just found this nursing forum. Are there any others who do this for a living here?
    Rob72, llaura, and RNROSER2011 like this.
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  5. 0
    I could never do that. God Bless you.

    renerian
  6. 0
    I admire your work. Sounds very rewarding. It takes a person who has a lot of heart and strength. What made you make your decision? I would love to know more about it if you wouldn't mind emailing me. It sounds like an option I would love to consider. Thanks, Angelia akcarmean@hotmail.com




    Quote from homenursingrj
    I've spent thirty-three years adopting medically fragile babies and children. I love this work. I love my children, hate when they die, am blessed with them all my life. I choose my own work, for the most part, have no boss over my head, etc. Of course, there are the surgeries, etc. I have no time off, and no retirement, but I love my work. I've spent years suctioning, clapping, giving oxygen, tube-feeding, etc. I love nurturing. My most rewarding thing is knowing that each baby or child has love and a mother, besides the nursing care they need.

    I know many families who live this life style, but I just found this nursing forum. Are there any others who do this for a living here?
  7. 0
    Quote from akcarmean
    I admire your work. Sounds very rewarding. It takes a person who has a lot of heart and strength. What made you make your decision? I would love to know more about it if you wouldn't mind emailing me. It sounds like an option I would love to consider. Thanks, Angelia akcarmean@hotmail.com
    If you would like to read more about my children's lives, (and mine) you could visit my site:
    A Child To Love
    http://www.4achildtolove.com

    And feel free to e-mail me. I value and enjoy communication with like-minded people!
  8. 0
    my husband and i are in the process of adopting a medically fragile child. i was the childes nurse for over a year, so i know the continous care that is needed for her she has nursing hours now and we are trying to figure out how to care for her and continue to work. i now work 12 hour shifts 4 days a week how do i continue to work those hours and be a mother to her, i dont want her nurses raising her but at the same time i cant afford to quest my nursing job. can someone pleas offer and advice on how to nagivate this
  9. 0
    God bless you for what you're doing. Not many people are cut out for that job. I have a 14yo severely mentally handicapped child. He's autistic, vision & hearing impaired, non-verbal and diaper dependent with no self-help skills. Christian was medically fragile when he was little, but has since grown strong and tall. Although he walks, he only has the mental capacity of a 12-18month old. Much as we love him, he's a double handful.

    There was a time when I would have wanted to do therapeutic foster care. But between my and DH, with our own medical issues, and caring for Christian we've got enough on our plates. Your children are multipli-blessed to have you in their lives. I'm sure their lives are much richer because you love them.:redpinkhe
  10. 2
    You are such a wonderful person for doing this. It must be so hard, so heartbreaking to watch these beautiful, precious little children become angels, and yet so rewarding to see their every little smile and to love every little thing that they do. People like yourself truly do make the world a better place. Your website is beautiful and bought tears to my eyes. The children are so beautiful and happy in the photos you have provided on your site, and i know that those smiles were put on their faces by having someone as wonderful as you in their lives. God bless you and your beautiful family.
    WANT2BANURSESOON and RNROSER2011 like this.
  11. 5
    I adopted a 2 year old boy from Russia in 1994. We knew he had a cleft-lip/palate, cardiac problems, ricketts, developmental delays, possibly autistic, hearing loss and lots of other possibilities. He had several surgeries, lots of dental work, speech tx, physical tx, occupational tx until I ran out of money. Did a lot of it myself by then. He is now 17 years old, A-B student, Mr. Popularity, captain of the high school track team, loving and caring. I so got lucky and blessed when this kid came into my life. One more big surgery and dental procedure to go, then off to college for my boy.
  12. 0
    Could you contact me by email, pkins421@gmail.com. I have so many questions. I am a private duty pediatric nurse and parent to three biologically related special needs children and have been considering doing this in my home, allowing me to care for a child in my home rather than leave my home to go care for children. I am interested in a young boy who has lived in a pediatric nursing home his entire life and is the same age as my son. I have so many questions though about cutting back or leaving my nursing position as I am the breadwinner of the family. My husband is a special needs teaching assistant and a great help. I think we would do very well with this but I have no idea where to start.
  13. 0
    God bless you and continue to nurtue you in your caring!

    pkins, this is an older thread. If you don't hear back, LMK, and I can see if someone at our Bethany Childrens' Center might have some advice.


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