Anyone used music as an intervention?

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    I work at a 28 bed Cardiac ICU and stepdown unit (14 beds ICU, 14 SDU) and am in the process of putting together a presentation to start using music as a nonpharmological intervention at work. I have already found plenty of research to support it and my director is on board with the idea. What I am looking for is anyone who is using it already and the logistics of how they do it on their unit. There is plenty of information/research about the benefits but not on the nuts and bolts of implementing it. Any info is appreciated- what equipment are you using (CD, Mp3, headphones, speakers etc), what problems did you run into, how did you facilitate multi patient use of equipment, etc? Thanks in advance.
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  3. 17 Comments so far...

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    well I work in pediatrics in a fairly well off hospital so that helps. Every patient has their own room and every room is set up with a TV and a "Get Well Network". Basically it's a hospital multimedia system. It has everything from "Welcome to xyz hospital", videos on what to expect, types of surgeries or procedures, going home with trachs, g-tubes etc, to movies for the kids. The movies section includes "relaxation" music that we can put on for them, we also have the option of going in the internet via the TV/s (they are essentially TV's & computers in one) and playing Pandora, I love this for slightly older kiddos because I can put on a "Disney Classics" station and we can rock out to Hakuna Matata together!

    All in all I LOVE having music as a nice background noise to take the focus off all the other beeps, alarms and bustle of the unit, parents also seem to really like it too.
    FireHorseNinja likes this.
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    All TVs in the patient rooms have the option for music or TV, the nurses can choose the music our ask the family what the patient enjoys and play it for them. As for our procedure rooms they have a sound system and a docking station equipped with aux port and radio. They also have hospital provided wifi as well.
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    We do have cable , educational videos and 1 station that has beach sounds but I am looking at something a little more specific, research based. Going by research, I am looking at non-lyrical music at 60 to 80 beats/min in a variety of sounds to meet different cultural prefences. I already have tons of music but need to figure out the nuts and bolts. Anyone use headphones/ speakers and not the TV?
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    roughmatch and aknottedyarn like this.
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    I recall from ALZ workshops hearing that people with dementia do well with a slower beat , 50/min. Similar to heart at rest. Since many people in higher acuity will be older, impaired by sedation or illness I wonder if the slower beat might be appropriate. I wish I knew the reference for you about the ALZ, this is just my recall.

    I find the whole topic very interesting. I hope you share more as you get more going in your area. I wish I had something to offer you besides my best wishes. I hope if hospitalized I am allowed, nay, encouraged to listen to the music of my choice.
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    Quote from mamatara
    I work at a 28 bed Cardiac ICU and stepdown unit (14 beds ICU, 14 SDU) and am in the process of putting together a presentation to start using music as a nonpharmological intervention at work. I have already found plenty of research to support it and my director is on board with the idea. What I am looking for is anyone who is using it already and the logistics of how they do it on their unit. There is plenty of information/research about the benefits but not on the nuts and bolts of implementing it. Any info is appreciated- what equipment are you using (CD, Mp3, headphones, speakers etc), what problems did you run into, how did you facilitate multi patient use of equipment, etc? Thanks in advance.
    In hospice we actually use live musicians rather than recorded music.
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    Please try to incorporate input from a qualified music therapist. Music therapy is more complex than most of us realize. You can find a qualified therapist in your area by going to http://www.musictherapy.org/

    Keep up the good work.
    aknottedyarn likes this.
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    I find this a very interesting question. I do wonder tho about the headphones as one can not hear much other than the music. For me, I listen to my I pod almost every night and it helps me get to sleep. I can have even rock going and sometimes I actually fall to sleep with it on and an hour later wake up to the music or to no music as the CD is finished. It always amazes me.
    mamatara likes this.
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    My son is thinking of joining the Music for Health club to play for people in the hospital. He's an engineering major. He isn't so sure that his trombone is the best instrument... he'll probably play his ocarina.

    On the peds floor at one of the hospitals, there is a harpist that comes around once a week and plays in the hall.
    tewdles likes this.


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