Would you ever be a scab? - page 3

by klone

Due to a short stint in travel nursing, I am now on the email list of several travel nursing companies. I just received an email from one company, talking about how they're gearing up to send 300+ nurses out to Maine, in... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from matt2401
    These words are as true today as when Jack London wrote them:

    After God had finished the rattlesnake, the toad, and the vampire, He had some awful substance left with which He made a scab. A scab is a two-legged animal with a corkscrew soul, a waterlogged brain, and a combination backbone made of jelly and glue. Where others have hearts, he carries a tumor of rotten principles.

    When a scab comes down the street, men turn their backs and angels weep in heaven, and the devil shuts the gates of hell to keep him out. No man has a right to scab as long as there is a pool of water deep enough to drown his body in, or a rope long enough to hang his carcass with. Judas Iscariot was a gentleman compared with a scab. For betraying his Master, he had character enough to hang himself. A scab hasn't.

    Esau sold his birthright for a mess of pottage. Judas Iscariot sold his savior for thirty pieces of silver. Benedict Arnold sold his country for a promise of a commission in the British Army. The modern strikebreaker sells his birthright, his country, his wife, his children, and his fellow men for an unfulfilled promise from his employer, trust, or corporation.
    NightAngelle and KarmaWiseRaven like this.
  2. 8
    Quote from Overland1
    Union-contrived talking points and derogatory names aside, I have no problem breaking a picket line to get to work... after all, is our profession not about helping and providing care for the patients and putting them first? If not, then some of us are in the wrong profession.

    The bottom line is that I am a "free agent" and will work wherever and for whomever I choose; I have not paid and will not pay fees so that I may work at a place that requires union membership.
    Well, "free" agent, you've got the golden handcuff syndrome, locked in by the money, like a mercenary 'soldier of fortune', and IMHO, ultimately, you sell the profession short taking that line of reasoning. (As the saying goes, "It's difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.")

    Are you really able to provide the safe and effective care with an high acuity/high patient to nurse ratio with limited or no ancillary staffing? Nah, ya just dumb down the concepts of safe and effective care, take the money and run, instead of trying to improve conditions. Taking the money and leaving the problems for someone else to solve is not professional. Neither is ignoring them, or stepping over and going around the nurses who are trying to effect positive change.

    It stands to reason that in a step down unit, for instance, if you have 3 patients, you're going to catch subtle signs and symptoms that could lead to deterioration of the patient's condition. If you're assigned 6 or 8 patients you're just not going to be able to do that; provide an optimum level of surveillance, ongoing assessment, evaluation, teaching, hygiene, and observing for efficacy or side effects of medication. Some nurses have a false sense of security about the code teams and rapid response teams, and reason that if anything bad happens, they've got back up. That's just wrong. Why push your patients to the cliff by remaining silent about deliberate "for profit" short staffing, and then, when you find they've fallen over the cliff, think someone else will come along, "just in time" to save them. That's unprofessional!
    WIN007, CCL RN, Leelee2, and 5 others like this.
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    I myself would cross the picket line. I'm a nurse not to much in to politics. Right or wrong there are people who depend on us who have nothing to do with the politics of the hospital they are there for a reason or is your schooling and taking care of people a joke and comes down to dollar and cents.

    And in doing so of crossing that line if any harm comes my way ( spitting on me trying to grab me trying to punch me or hurt me in any way) You (yourself) will be in the hospital you are picketing. I will personally see to it.

    I understand work conditions and money health insurance and feeding your family and in the same token you have to understand i have to feed my family as well. Politics will play their games you have to be big enough to play yours and it's not a question of stabbing my sisters and brothers in the back. I have to do whats right for me and you should do the same. These are my thoughts use them as you wish
    NightAngelle, nursebenson, kcmylorn, and 1 other like this.
  4. 4
    I can understand both sides- I do believe we nurses have to stand up to these greedy administrations but I can also understand that nurses need to keep roofs over their kids' heads, heat in their homes and food on the table- many of our nurses from certain areas of our country are not making a decent wage or are out of work and can't find a full time position. This economy is god awful and very cruel to nurses.
    I would love to be a "union organizer" like the one the above poster cited - interviewing staff during a strike and info gathering.
    NightAngelle, lindarn, laborer, and 1 other like this.
  5. 5
    Having worked for staffing companies; if they're paying $46 then they're charging the hospital close to $200.

    $46 ain't enough.
    CCL RN, Leelee2, kcmylorn, and 2 others like this.
  6. 4
    No, I would not be a scab. It goes against everything I believe in. I wish we could have unions where I live.....unfortunately, saying the "union" word is enough to get someone fired where I live. I can understand the necessity for some out of work nurses to work as scabs in order to make ends meet, but I certainly hope I won't ever have to do that. Oh, and the word "scab" in these terms is not meant to be insulting. I work with a nurse who refers to herself as a "scab"; she travels wherever there is a strike. As for the nurses who claim they couldn't be disloyal to an employer or their patients......do you really honestly think they give a **** about you? When I'm at work I do what I'm paid to do but I don't wear my heart on a sleeve.
    CCL RN, nicurn001, VanLpn, and 1 other like this.
  7. 1
    Here's a web site for that nurse to read http://www.wisegeek.com/in-labor-ter...-is-a-scab.htm
    lindarn likes this.
  8. 0
    To Become A Union Organizer ....... http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079638/
  9. 2
    Quote from RN4MERCY
    Well, "free" agent, you've got the golden handcuff syndrome, locked in by the money, like a mercenary 'soldier of fortune', and IMHO, ultimately, you sell the profession short taking that line of reasoning. (As the saying goes, "It's difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.")

    Are you really able to provide the safe and effective care with an high acuity/high patient to nurse ratio with limited or no ancillary staffing? Nah, ya just dumb down the concepts of safe and effective care, take the money and run, instead of trying to improve conditions. Taking the money and leaving the problems for someone else to solve is not professional. Neither is ignoring them, or stepping over and going around the nurses who are trying to effect positive change.

    It stands to reason that in a step down unit, for instance, if you have 3 patients, you're going to catch subtle signs and symptoms that could lead to deterioration of the patient's condition. If you're assigned 6 or 8 patients you're just not going to be able to do that; provide an optimum level of surveillance, ongoing assessment, evaluation, teaching, hygiene, and observing for efficacy or side effects of medication. Some nurses have a false sense of security about the code teams and rapid response teams, and reason that if anything bad happens, they've got back up. That's just wrong. Why push your patients to the cliff by remaining silent about deliberate "for profit" short staffing, and then, when you find they've fallen over the cliff, think someone else will come along, "just in time" to save them. That's unprofessional!
    So you're saying its unprofessional to not be in a union?? I'm sorry but striking does not effect positive change. It puts patients at risk for someone's need to make more money. Forcing people to pay to work is not positive change. As far as the mercenary comment, the same can be said for unionizers. They try to organize hospitals like its a military operation! Showing up in breakrooms, the lunch room, outside the hospital with their pathetic little organizing cards. Showing up at peoples homes and also calling to harass them about how great the union will be for them. Talk about unprofessional!!
    marthyellen and nursebenson like this.
  10. 1
    To those who look down on "scabs"....it's my understanding that you get paid a ridiculously low amount per day to strike. What about single parents who simply can't afford to picket? Those who will end up living in a shelter with their children if they can't pay their rent? you can be sure the union bosses make their full salary while strikes are going on.....but the strikers?
    If anyone looked down on me for taking the opportunity to be a "scab": it must be nice to be sitting on your high horse with plenty of money to continue to feed your family. Some aren't that fortunate. To lose that time from work would mean to lose utilities, homes, vehicles, food and more.
    Some people may say they'd do that for their principles. Again....shame on you if you have young children you would drag through the pain of losing a home or going to bed hungry.
    I know when I was travel nursing in California, the entire support staff (excluding nurses) was organizing a planned strike. However, those who could not afford so would let managers know to expect them at work. From what i saw, it was civil and these people were not looked down upon. I knew many in the situation i described above. I couldn't imagine someone being horrible to them for continuing to work. I doubt those same people would give them money out of their own pockets to compesate. Or pay their rent for them.
    nursebenson likes this.


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