Top 10 Reasons Against Unions - page 3

by PICUPNP

top ten reasons why we don't want a union 10. the union doesn't write my paycheck. 9. unions would rather cause problems than work together. 8. union scale means the best workers are carrying the worst. 7. the... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Freedom42
    Yes. Those are just some of the things that could happen. A contract protects you in many ways.

    Do you have life insurance? Health insurance? Car insurance? Do you deposit your money in a bank that is FDIC insured? Why? Do you want to protect yourself against things that are out of your control? Why wouldn't you protect your job and your income in the same manner?

    Strikes are not common.
    I don't now nor have i ever worried about my job or income since becoming a nurse. As to the above ?s, no life insurance, health insurance yes, car insurance because I'm forced, and FDIC doesnt matter. I control my career based on my performance. If I don't perform well, I dont have a job!
  2. 1
    Quote from Freedom42
    One more thing: Ask the doctors you work with if they'd give up their personal service contracts. I think you already know the answer.

    Doctors know what their rate of pay will be in the coming year. They know for how long their health care benefits are guaranteed. They know exactly how much and for how long money will be contributed to their retirement accounts. Do you?

    Why shouldn't you be entitled to the same guarantee? Doesn't a nurse -- or any other hospital employee, for that matter -- merit the same guarantees as a doctor?

    No personal service contracts here, just asked my attending of over 20yrs and he's never heard of any such thing. There are no guarantees in life. There's no guarntee that an organized hospital will cave to the unions demands. The guarantee would be great but the aspects of striking, senority, closed shops and etc will always keep me from joining. These considerations far outweigh any contract that MIGHT be agreed upon by the hospital.
    As far as strikes not being common, hogwash! Just had a bunch walk out in Minneapolis!
    roughmatch likes this.
  3. 4
    I don't agree that you should unionize if you have a good and reasonable relationship with your employer. Of course, this is based upon the experience of having worked for several excellent organizations over the years...non union.

    And, I understand that should your hospital or group or (fill in the blank) be purchased by another or undergo some significant change, the specifics of your employment could also change significantly (and very quickly). I experienced that so...

    That aside, I do not think that it is weird that you work in a non union hospital that treats it's nurses (and staff) well...it just used to be more common. I don't think, however, that your situation should cloud your assessment of the nursing employment conditions in thousands of hospitals and LTCs across the country...some nurses NEED organized representation.

    And I don't think that you need to be or must be unionized...there are benefits to not being...just like there are risks, and some of us handle some risks better than others.
    MassED, DizzyLizzyNurse, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  4. 1
    yes,yes you are right rn1980 bring the union train to mississippi..let it's first stop be here in jackson....
    lindarn likes this.
  5. 5
    Then on to Tennessee. Sometimes even if you do perform incredibly well you may come upon a non-nurse bully manager and her bully squad, who has no respect for some RN's , maybe all RN's in general, maybe a little jealous, who really knows, and then targets you for BS reasons. She targets you and when you go above her your told you've gone out of the chain of command and are fired by her and her bully squad after almost 20 years of exemplary service. What about that? I really think a union would've helped me. I'd been glad to pay some dues for protection from the bully squad of unprofessionals. I worked hard for my patients and doctors and fellow nurses whenever I could. I tried to go above and beyond with a smile everyday.
    Last edit by Joe V on Sep 28, '10
  6. 3
    Quote from BULLYDAWGRN
    yes,yes you are right rn1980 bring the union train to mississippi..let it's first stop be here in jackson....
    MS is a special case. HMA controls most of the major hospitals except UMC, Baptist, and the VA.

    The VA is the only hospital in MS with a union. The CNA union is actually really good, but the RN/LPN union wines and dines with the managers.

    Unions would be hard to fit into MS. HMA and others are close buddies with Hinds Community College, Holmes Community College, et al to make sure there are hundreds of desperate graduates willing to work for 16 USD an hour just to get experience and relief from student loans.

    My personal view is that unions should take the place of agencies like Southern, Preferred, etc and facilities be forced to use union labor like electricians have. I used to have a friend that was a crewman on boats. Anytime he needed a job, he just walked into a union hall. He was guaranteed a pay rate based on his experience and was placed in a job if his dues were up to date and paperwork/certs were in order.
    laborer, wondern, and lindarn like this.
  7. 0
    What do you mean "the RN/LPN union wines and dines with the managers"? What is your personal view about LPN's and do they even fit into nursing any more, with the move to unionize RN's?
  8. 1
    Quote from wondern
    Then on to Tennessee. Sometimes even if you do perform incredibly well you may come upon a non-nurse bully manager and her bully squad, who has no respect for some RN's , maybe all RN's in general, maybe a little jealous, who really knows, and then targets you for BS reasons. She targets you and when you go above her your told you've gone out of the chain of command and are fired by her and her bully squad after almost 20 years of exemplary service. What about that? I really think a union would've helped me. I'd been glad to pay some dues for protection from the bully squad of unprofessionals. I worked hard for my patients and doctors and fellow nurses whenever I could. I tried to go above and beyond with a smile everyday.
    Did you call an attorney?

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    wondern likes this.
  9. 9
    Quote from lindarn
    Did you call an attorney?

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    Contrary to what many people believe, the ability of an employment attorney to help most workers in a non-union environment is pretty slim. It's one of the oddities of employment in America, that an employer can't fire you because of your race, age, gender - maybe a couple of other protected reasons - but they usually can fire you for no reason at all.
    I've also observed that it's amazing what lengths some managers will occasionally go to to target a particular employee they've decided to get rid of.
    If a manager starts checking every single piece of charting you do, starts questioning your patients to see if they have anything to complain about, enlists a couple of her special favorites to follow you around and report back on everything you say, etc, it's amazing what a black picture can be painted of even a very good nurse.
    As a union steward at my hospital, I've gotten involved in a number of really bizarre cases. One nurse had an absolutely stellar record over many years until she came under one particular charge nurse who hated nurses of her ethnicity. This charge nurse started questioning her patients about her, and when she found a patient who shared her prejudice, she's say something like this: "You know, she's a really bad nurse, but people are afraid to say anything against her. It would really help us if you would give us a complaint we could use". She finally managed to generate some complaints she could use to fire the nurse. Fortunately, there were counter witnesses, including witnesses to the charge nurse's prejudice, and the nurse ended up with a nice financial settlement.
    Fortunately, genuinely unfair managers are rare. But when you run up against a really bad one, sometimes the only thing to do is get out. A strong union can be a big help, but even with that a really nefarious manager who's willing to work at it can still get away with bad stuff.
    Last edit by Chico David RN on Dec 20, '10
    herring_RN, Fiona59, HazelLPN, and 6 others like this.
  10. 7
    Quote from Chico David RN
    Contrary to what many people believe, the ability of an employment attorney to help most workers in a non-union environment is pretty slim. It's one of the oddities of employment in America, that an employer can't fire you because of your race, age, gender - maybe a couple of other protected reasons - but they usually can fire you for no reason at all.
    I've also observed that it's amazing what lengths some managers will occasionally go to to target a particular employee they've decided to get rid of.
    If a manager starts checking every single piece of charting you do, starts questioning your patients to see if they have anything to complain about, enlists a couple of her special favorites to follow you around and report back on everything you say, etc, it's amazing what a black picture can be painted of even a very good nurse.
    As a union steward at my hospital, I've gotten involved in a number of really bizarre cases. One nurse had an absolutely stellar record over many years until she came under one particular charge nurse who hated nurses of her ethnicity. This charge nurse started questioning her patients about her, and when she found a patient who shared her prejudice, she's say something like this: "You know, she's a really bad nurse, but people are afraid to say anything against her. It would really help us if you would give us a complaint we could use". She finally managed to generate some complaints she could use to fire the nurse. Fortunately, there were counter witnesses, including witnesses to the charge nurse's prejudice, and the nurse ended up with a nice financial settlement.
    Fortunately, genuinely unfair managers are rare. But when you run up against a really bad one, sometimes the only thing to do is get out. A strong union can be a big help, but even with that a really nefarious manager whose willing to work at it can still get away with bad stuff.
    The cure for "at will employment", is a union contract. That also goes for the, "right to work (for less), laws.

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    herring_RN, loriangel14, CCL RN, and 4 others like this.


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