Issues...

  1. 0
    Okay, so I just need to ***** for a second. Last night my charge nurse gave a double dose of Ketamine and a benadril to a pt. I'm not saying she gave him 2 when he gets one to 2. She gave him twice the dose he was supposed to get. I witnessed all of this because it took place at the nurses station. So, because I don't like calls in the morning asking me what the hell happened and why the pt was over sedated, I reported what happened to the oncoming charge nurse. (And yes, when stuff happens at night and they want to know what is going on they call me; not the charge nurse.) She also had me write down what was given and when so that she could give it to the ADON. Then at 2 I get told that the ADONs response was "Tell him to mind his own business." Now we don't get along real well anyway because of past issues, but I would think that when something like that happens the people in charge would want to know. Ketamine isn't a tylenol or antacid. This is heavy duty stuff. I just don't know what to do anymore. The nurse that I work with has already killed one person and it's been close calls on a few others and every time I tell them the stupid crap she does I get in trouble because of it. She doesn't even get told not to do it again it's just completely ignored. I just don't know what to do anymore.

    And just to add to my fun I just found out the ADON will be my charge nurse on Tuesday. ***. Is it to late for my mother to abort me? cause I'm thinking I could convince her.

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  2. 27 Comments...

  3. 1
    Just a friendly reminder that as a mandatory reporter you are required by law to report any unusual occurances to your supervisor. If you cannot get anywhere with the supervisor you follow the chain of command up to the administration. If they do nothing then you can call your ombudsman or the Department of Health and Human services.
    AlexCNA likes this.
  4. 0
    Fortunately last night was her last night (I'm so happy!) so I won't have to babysit her anymore. It's just frustrating to see things and nobody care. I just find myself disturbed by the lack of interest on the administrations part and their disregard for what I tell them as well as the disrespect they show me. I know that my knowledge of nursing practices is more limited than theirs, but I do know you don't double a persons medicines without a little thing called a doctors order. I'm really starting to think that the only way for things to improve is a really good look by a federal agency, but they cover their tracks really well. I can guarantee that there will be no record of what happened anywhere and it will be just my word. If our administrator, DON, and ADON spent half the effort they put into hiding things that they did into improving them we might not be the place that nobody wants to work. It has everything going for it except for them and a couple bad nurses and aides. I could fill this site with horror stories if I wasn't worried we'd all get publicly executed for it.
  5. 6
    Although I understand as a CNA its good to know what medications a patient is being given and even the dosage, I'm still sort of confused as to why you are taking it on yourself to "babysit" this RN so they dont make medication errors. Seems to me this is WAY outside the scope of practice of a CNA. You dont have the education or the training to properly judge if the RNs actions are appropriate.
    sunnybabe, sharpeimom, Paws2people, and 3 others like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from funtimes
    Although I understand as a CNA its good to know what medications a patient is being given and even the dosage, I'm still sort of confused as to why you are taking it on yourself to "babysit" this RN so they dont make medication errors. Seems to me this is WAY outside the scope of practice of a CNA. You dont have the education or the training to properly judge if the RNs actions are appropriate.
    I agree. Who knows what was stated on the MAR? Perhaps this was a stat order that she was instructed to give via the pt's doctor?
  7. 1
    how do you know she made these med errors? did you hear her talking about it? if you witnessed it, why were you following her around on med pass instead of taking care of your patient assignment? she killed a patient? really?
    sharpeimom likes this.
  8. 0
    I know she made the error because the pt came to the nurses station for the medication. I was there doing my paperwork. I witnessed him ask for the med and her administer it.

    She killed a pt at the hospital she worked at just before coming to the nursing home. Nobody will talk about what exactly happened, but a friend worked there and she told me she made some kind of "Grievous med error" which directly resulted in the death of a pt.

    I'm aware that I've stepped outside the bounds of my job and training.

    I checked the MAR and the pts chart. We had had no contact with the DR that night. I answer the phones. Also, I should mention that we work the 10p to 6A shift at a small LTC facility with only 30 pts. Doctors don't call us at night. Unless we call them we have no contact with them. Usually she is down in a pts room watching TV when she isn't charting or something. Also, just for clarity this is an LPN not an RN. I've been babysitting her for 6 years due to her incompetence. She comes to me when she has questions on procedure and what to do in an emergency situation (sudden death, falls, etc.). I've been forced to learn quite a bit of nursing practices as they relate to LTC care as well as a hefty dose of information on medications so that I will be aware of contraindications, allergies, side effects, etc. so that I can cope with all but the most extreme problems. She's even been known to call me at home to ask me questions when I'm not working if it's routine stuff.

    When I work with any other nurse I don't babysit them. This is a special case. I am so excited to get a new nurse because it means I'll be able to pay less attention to her and more attention to the new NA that I'm supposed to be training. Tonight I'm supposed to re-orientate the new charge nurse (She's been a nurse for 30 years and I would trust her with the life of anyone I know. She just hasn't worked nights in LTC for a long time.) and then I can distance myself from the LVNs job and focus on mine.
  9. 3
    Quote from AlexCNA
    I know she made the error because the pt came to the nurses station for the medication. I was there doing my paperwork. I witnessed him ask for the med and her administer it.

    She killed a pt at the hospital she worked at just before coming to the nursing home. Nobody will talk about what exactly happened, but a friend worked there and she told me she made some kind of "Grievous med error" which directly resulted in the death of a pt.

    I'm aware that I've stepped outside the bounds of my job and training.

    I checked the MAR and the pts chart. We had had no contact with the DR that night. I answer the phones. Also, I should mention that we work the 10p to 6A shift at a small LTC facility with only 30 pts. Doctors don't call us at night. Unless we call them we have no contact with them. Usually she is down in a pts room watching TV when she isn't charting or something. Also, just for clarity this is an LPN not an RN. I've been babysitting her for 6 years due to her incompetence. She comes to me when she has questions on procedure and what to do in an emergency situation (sudden death, falls, etc.). I've been forced to learn quite a bit of nursing practices as they relate to LTC care as well as a hefty dose of information on medications so that I will be aware of contraindications, allergies, side effects, etc. so that I can cope with all but the most extreme problems. She's even been known to call me at home to ask me questions when I'm not working if it's routine stuff.

    When I work with any other nurse I don't babysit them. This is a special case. I am so excited to get a new nurse because it means I'll be able to pay less attention to her and more attention to the new NA that I'm supposed to be training. Tonight I'm supposed to re-orientate the new charge nurse (She's been a nurse for 30 years and I would trust her with the life of anyone I know. She just hasn't worked nights in LTC for a long time.) and then I can distance myself from the LVNs job and focus on mine.
    If you spend so much time "babysitting" her, how do you find time to fulfill your own job duties? And how is it possible that your "training" a charge nurse when you are a CNA?

    Sorry, I'm not gonna believe that " grevious med error" rumor. That's hearsay. If she was so bad, why is she still practicing as a nurse? I'm sure somebody would have reported her to the BON by now.
    sharpeimom, mstearns09, and funtimes like this.
  10. 3
    The fact still remains you seem to have appointed yourself to duties for which you are neither trained nor licensed for.

    I'm no lawyer, but I would also be aware of spreading rumors about how this nurse "killed" a patient previously. If you are doing this to people who know the identity of the Nurse in question, this could be a serious case of defamation of character, or slander.
    sharpeimom, miabia, and KimberlyRN89 like this.
  11. 2
    I'm thinking this is not a factual post. None of it makes sense.
    sharpeimom and miabia like this.


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