What is beyond the CRNA position? - page 2

After one completes an accredited MSN Nurse Anesthesia program, and becomes a Ceritified Registered Nurse Anesthetist, what other carrer paths can you take afterwards that relates to the field? Are... Read More

  1. by   rn29306
    [QUOTE=angelladyclaire]
    Quote from rn29306
    Certainly a valid set of questions, but do you have any idea what $200K + for a year's salary is and what that allows you to do, what that allows you to do for your family and extended family?"

    NOt all CRNA's make that much...
    It is all in your choice of work. These figures are for a new grad first-year out friend of mine working in north georgia under ATC design.
  2. by   subee
    [QUOTE=rn29306]
    Quote from angelladyclaire

    It is all in your choice of work. These figures are for a new grad first-year out friend of mine working in north georgia under ATC design.
    Yes, you can make that much if you do a lot of overtime - a LOT of overtime. However, I've yet to hear of a base salary of $200,000.
  3. by   gotosleep
    [QUOTE=subee]
    Quote from rn29306

    Yes, you can make that much if you do a lot of overtime - a LOT of overtime. However, I've yet to hear of a base salary of $200,000.
    go to www.gaswork.com...

    I know of several positions in Illinois alone offering over 200K.
  4. by   UCDSICURN
    [QUOTE=gotosleep]
    Quote from subee

    go to www.gaswork.com...

    I know of several positions in Illinois alone offering over 200K.
    1099 or W-4 employee? I'm betting 1099.......
  5. by   rn29306
    [QUOTE=subee]
    Quote from rn29306

    Yes, you can make that much if you do a lot of overtime - a LOT of overtime. However, I've yet to hear of a base salary of $200,000.
    Correct me if I am wrong, but I never alluded to the fact that these figures were base salary. All I said was CRNAs can make that much money and your statement above just validated my point.
  6. by   jwk
    Quote from badass
    If you want to get into management you need an MBA or go to med school.
    Why would you think that? I manage a group with 70 anesthetists in three facilities that do a combined 35,000 procedures a year. No MBA here. In fact, most of the people I know that are the chief anesthetist or department head for their group or hospital do NOT have an MBA, and none of them are physicians.
  7. by   Terpole
    Quote from jwk
    Why would you think that? I manage a group with 70 anesthetists in three facilities that do a combined 35,000 procedures a year. No MBA here. In fact, most of the people I know that are the chief anesthetist or department head for their group or hospital do NOT have an MBA, and none of them are physicians.

    To clear some things up for me, what's a Chief Nurse anesthetist, what do they do, and what it takes to be one
  8. by   jwk
    Quote from Lionheart
    To clear some things up for me, what's a Chief Nurse anesthetist, what do they do, and what it takes to be one
    They are generally the person that has administrative responsibility for the anesthetists in a department. The responsibilities vary, but might include scheduling, daily assignments, interviewing, hiring and firing, budgeting, and at least in my case, acting as the go-between for the anesthetists and anesthesiologists in the group.

    I think many groups probably promote from within, but you'll also see ads for chief anesthetists in journals or Gaswork.com.
  9. by   TCU RRNA
    Quote from jwk
    They are generally the person that has administrative responsibility for the anesthetists in a department. The responsibilities vary, but might include scheduling, daily assignments, interviewing, hiring and firing, budgeting, and at least in my case, acting as the go-between for the anesthetists and anesthesiologists in the group.

    I think many groups probably promote from within, but you'll also see ads for chief anesthetists in journals or Gaswork.com.

    Correct me if i am wrong but doesn't Chief Anesthetist imply that you are an ANESTHETIST? It is great that you have such an awesome job and have the entire world of anesthesia at your beckon call but your job sounds more like a combo of office manager and human resources director. So it sounds like you make assignments to CRNAs and MDAs alike, hire, fire and budget for all of that. You must have more training than an AA. Do you have a MBA or what?
  10. by   jwk
    Quote from TCU RRNA
    Correct me if i am wrong but doesn't Chief Anesthetist imply that you are an ANESTHETIST? It is great that you have such an awesome job and have the entire world of anesthesia at your beckon call but your job sounds more like a combo of office manager and human resources director. So it sounds like you make assignments to CRNAs and MDAs alike, hire, fire and budget for all of that. You must have more training than an AA. Do you have a MBA or what?
    If you read the post again, I stated "The responsibilities vary, but might include scheduling, daily assignments, interviewing, hiring and firing, budgeting..." I didn't mean to imply that I did all of these things, but I know some chief anesthetists that do. The job descriptions will vary depending on whether it's a private group or a hospital, size of the department, and any number of other factors. Some might deal with equipment issues - evaluating or purchasing new toys for the department. Some sit on hospital committees that want involvement from the anesthesia department. For some places, the chief is probably just the person who has been there the longest. I only know of one in my area that has an MBA, which he earned long after he became chief anesthetist for his group.

    I am in the OR every single day taking care of patients. I still take call, work holidays, and average 25-30 hrs OT a week. I used to have one day a month for administrative time, but that has disappeared since we are down about 10 anesthetists at the moment. I squeeze in administrative work between cases when I can, and at home when I can't. I think the main qualification in many cases is simply to have the interest. Most people have no desire to get involved with administrative stuff. I've thought about getting an MBA, but in my situation, I can't see that it would help me much.
  11. by   mnyapala
    im currenlty taking my phds in nursing and i heard a rumor that there is a DNP(doctorates in nursing practice) programme which takes 4years to graduate however i dont know the job description.Now when i looked in the curriculum and talked to a person from ANA, i realised there is no big difference from PHD and a part from just taking extra research classes its very synergestic with phd.im now specialising and working on analgesics and pain in mice.Please has anybody or does anyone has the specific infromation about this DNP programme this is new and i wonder what is different from PHD will and where exactly will one work,salary and the impact on nursing etc.This was not defined to me on my phone conversation
    quzicall CCRN,
  12. by   meandragonbrett
    Quote from mnyapala
    im currenlty taking my phds in nursing and i heard a rumor that there is a DNP(doctorates in nursing practice) programme which takes 4years to graduate however i dont know the job description.Now when i looked in the curriculum and talked to a person from ANA, i realised there is no big difference from PHD and a part from just taking extra research classes its very synergestic with phd.im now specialising and working on analgesics and pain in mice.Please has anybody or does anyone has the specific infromation about this DNP programme this is new and i wonder what is different from PHD will and where exactly will one work,salary and the impact on nursing etc.This was not defined to me on my phone conversation
    quzicall CCRN,

    The DNP already exists. It's a clinically focused doctorate. The ANCC's position is that the DNP become the graduate degree for advanced practice nursing (NP, CNS, CRNA, CNM. You can obtain more information on the DNP from the ANCC.
  13. by   Terpole
    Quote from meandragonbrett
    The DNP already exists. It's a clinically focused doctorate. The ANCC's position is that the DNP become the graduate degree for advanced practice nursing (NP, CNS, CRNA, CNM. You can obtain more information on the DNP from the ANCC.

    ^^^So what does that mean? Does it only mean that you'll be no different from a CRNA except you can do research? (And teach of course)

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