Here's what AAs really think of CRNAs - page 18

And this comes from the PRESIDENT of the American Society of Anesthesiologist Assistants Again, assertions that AAs and CRNAs function at the same level -absolutely misleading. And, what's... Read More

  1. by   dneill01
    Quote from jwk
    Feel better? And all this from a non-CRNA - I'm impressed.

    Last I looked, there is a shortage of anesthesia providers everywhere, urban, as well as rural. There are THOUSANDS of anesthesia vacancies nationwide.

    Yes, AA's work WITH the anesthesiologist. That is not some earth-shattering discovery. We've done it for more than 30 years.

    No, we were NOT created by the ASA and the AMA (where did THAT come from?). Check my upcoming AA history post for the facts.

    Oh, and just in case you didn't know, we're legally licensed in Missouri.
    JWK
    I am all about good safe anesthesia care, that is why I am pursueing the profession. As long as it provided, I dont really care who gives it. The routes are different but the end result is hopefully the same "good practice".
    I stand corrected the AA where not created by the AMA or the ASA but where created at medical schools and are more and more starting to be pushed by the ASA. They dont want to lose their hold on the money or power, you know that is true. Regardless of AAs or CRNAs, there are more than enough jobs for each. I havent run into any AAs in Missouri but I am sure I will and I am sure that we will work side by side. I only hope that the AA programs and the CRNA programs continue to be selective and keep the standards high as to not flood the market with anesthesia providers and kill what is now becoming a good paying job. MDAs have been making >350k a year for too long as the CRNA have carried the load and now the AAs too.
    Note that the ASA is trying to rope AAs and CRNAs into their organization to provide better care according to them. This would be a grave mistake for AAs and CRNAs as it would suggest that AAs and CRNAs provide care substandard to that of an MDA.

    If it was sarcasm "Feel better? And all this from a non-CRNA - I'm impressed"
    That really isnt necessary, this is a forum of opinions and we know that everyone has one.

    Trauma Tom, speaking of Nurses ashamed of their nursing background, I feel being called an Anesthesia Nurse upsets some (not all) because it insinuates that they are nurses first, but then again we are. I may feel differently when I finish this program, I am of course speaking from ignorance rather then stupidity.
  2. by   forane2001
    That is laughable. She is a nurse that is resentful of CRNA's or probably wanted to do anesthesia and was too lazy to go to school or could not get in!!! .....(edited TOS. Karen) You deserve an AA.
    By the way , if you have been a staff nurse for 30+ years take a hint- retire. You dont know what you are talking about. I image you suck up to doctors too. I know your type all too well. That is what is wrong with nursing and why it will never progress the way medicine has.
    Quote from teeituptom
    Im a nurse with 3 decades in service

    If Im having surgery I want an AA, not an CRNA.

    and also for my family
  3. by   ZAHMAN
    It's still moving. Kick it again.
  4. by   zrmorgan
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    The times that I have surgery, I said "I do not want a CRNA or other anesthesia assistant. You will provide an MD or you will have a problem."

    fine...who is on call for derm tonight?
  5. by   hotomalis
    Quote from nilepoc
    I would like to take you up on your offer.....

    I ask that this remain civil, and I would like to thank you for this opportunity.

    Craig
    I am looking in to going to graduate CRNA school. I'm still an undergraduate student and I had no idea there was such a thing as a "AA vs CRNA" thing going on.
    I tried following the string of postings and I think the bottom line is not how much each profession contributes to healthcare (because we both know we both do!). I think the problem is how CRNA's are portrayed in the speech by the MD: "Nurses....don't think much of them, in fact, don't put your life in their hands, but AA, YES! put your life in their hands. I would". That is the message I'm getting from that speech.
    A healthy education on each point is important to learn from. But consider this: it is a doctor making the point, and not an AA or a CRNA. The MD knows about medicine but does not have the bedside manner AA AND CRNA's have and the continuity of patience that it requires. This MD thinks that being a nurse is not as important as he portrays in this speech, yet, there is an emergency on understaffing of nurses and people are panicking.
    AA and CRNA are both important and don't let ANYONE tell you the contrary. We can both benefit from each other's practice and we should treat each other with the respect all the years of school and experience have given us the right to have.
    If an AA wants the recognition, consult with the CRNA as to how to become an independent practitioner like the CRNA's have accomplish. If you don't feel comfortable with that, it is ok too. We (and this is news to me because I took the same courses as a PA) could learn about the courses an AA takes and that the dear MD was talking about so that not only we can have the CRNA knowledge but we can also have the AA's.
    Let's face it guys, there is too much hate out there and too many people dying. We have to learn to re-direct our outrage into curiosity and learn from it so that we can become better people.
    Did I mention I'm a nursing student? Oh, yes, I'm also 42 with 21 years of experience as an electrical engineer, a mom, a wife and a homemaker. But I never doubted, my career was in nursing because I LEARNED that to be a nurse, it takes a special "something" to be a good one.
    Cheers!
    Last edit by hotomalis on Jul 20, '04 : Reason: I forgot to put a title
  6. by   jjjez
    Quote from Tenesma
    i don't see what is wrong with anesthesia nurse... i am an anesthesia doctor... who cares?

    by the way, don't be so hell bent on having anesthetist as part of your title, because in Great Britain, the term anesthetist (until the last few years) was primarily used for the anesthesia assistant who sets up the room and equipment, and draws up drugs...
    WRONG!!!
    In the UK the term anaesthetist (how it's spelt here) is the equivalent to the US anesthesiologist.
    As we say in the UK
    'Get it right!'
    Last edit by jjjez on Jul 24, '04
  7. by   tridil2000
    Why does the ASA support us. Very simple - we are not their competitors. We exist solely for one purpose and that is to allow the MDA to supervise and bill for up to 4 anesthetizing locations at once. I have heard the term physician externder used when discussing AAs and CRNAs in this type of practice. It is entirely accurate. You as CRNAs are going up against the ASA at the national level on a regular basis. You see yourselves as their equivalent and that is why they are less than friendly when it comes to the politics of anesthesia.


    ~~ my friend is in crna school. i do er and icu, and have NO interest in who is better. i just wanted to say that it sounds like the mds are 'using' you. sooner or later insurances (medicare included) will catch on to that, and put a stop to it. in the end, it will be cheaper for them to pay 1 crna for 1 procedure, than 1 md for 4. they won't care about the 'wait.'

    you might not care about that point bc you're making good money now, but some in your field may get disgusted with being the 'tool' through which the md gets paid. hey, take it from us nurses... there was a time when we didn't do foleys or hang blood or put in simple ivs! YOU should always be paid for the service you provide directly by the payor/insurance. otherwise, your future is as secure as a dixie cup at a picnic.
  8. by   jwk
    Quote from tridil2000
    Why does the ASA support us. Very simple - we are not their competitors. We exist solely for one purpose and that is to allow the MDA to supervise and bill for up to 4 anesthetizing locations at once. I have heard the term physician externder used when discussing AAs and CRNAs in this type of practice. It is entirely accurate. You as CRNAs are going up against the ASA at the national level on a regular basis. You see yourselves as their equivalent and that is why they are less than friendly when it comes to the politics of anesthesia.


    ~~ my friend is in crna school. i do er and icu, and have NO interest in who is better. i just wanted to say that it sounds like the mds are 'using' you. sooner or later insurances (medicare included) will catch on to that, and put a stop to it. in the end, it will be cheaper for them to pay 1 crna for 1 procedure, than 1 md for 4. they won't care about the 'wait.'



    you might not care about that point bc you're making good money now, but some in your field may get disgusted with being the 'tool' through which the md gets paid. hey, take it from us nurses... there was a time when we didn't do foleys or hang blood or put in simple ivs! YOU should always be paid for the service you provide directly by the payor/insurance. otherwise, your future is as secure as a dixie cup at a picnic.
    Do you really want to start this up again?

    Have nurses ever been paid directly for putting in foleys or hanging blood? Nope. So what does that do for your comment that "YOU should always be paid for the service you provide directly by the payor/insurance. otherwise, your future is as secure as a dixie cup at a picnic".

    It's about competition. Period. AA's provide the competition - CRNA's are scared of it. Unless you have something new and insightful about AA's (and obviously you don't), why not just give it a rest and read through the other 23 pages of this discussion and the others that have already discussed and bashed AA's ad nauseum.
  9. by   deepz
    Quote from jwk
    Do you really want to start this up again?

    ..... AA's provide the competition - CRNA's are scared of it. .....

    In your dreams, buddy.

    deepz
  10. by   gaspassah
    please i beg of you, let this thread die, someone call the dr kevorkian of threads please.
    d
  11. by   jwk
    Quote from deepz
    In your dreams, buddy.

    deepz

    Quote from gaspassah
    please i beg of you, let this thread die, someone call the dr kevorkian of threads please.
    d
    deepz and gaspassah - just making sure you were still around
  12. by   SCSRNA
    How about this...
    I worked in an ICU in ATL for 4 years prior to starting anesthesia school. When meeting with the head MD of the Anes. Dept ( an AA-friendly Anes. dept I might add) regarding a job when I got out of school, I shyed away when he offered me a starting salary for $76,000. That's a memorable number.
  13. by   cnmtocrna
    Quote from SCSRNA
    How about this...
    I worked in an ICU in ATL for 4 years prior to starting anesthesia school. When meeting with the head MD of the Anes. Dept ( an AA-friendly Anes. dept I might add) regarding a job when I got out of school, I shyed away when he offered me a starting salary for $76,000. That's a memorable number.
    In reference to my recent post under "washington DC CRNAs," I will direct everyone's attention to the blatant GREED factor underlying this post.
    This post is also misleading. The hospitals here in Atlanta tend to give student loan reimbursement - this officially counts as INCOME. Maybe the base is 76,000, this sounds low to me. I think it is more like 90,000. There is all sorts of money to be had for hours worked over a standard shift, weekend, night call. As a midwife 60 hour weeks were standard with no extra for 24 hours straight, weekends, nights.....AND I had as many patients as there happened to be - maybe 2, maybe 7. In anesthesia, you get one patient at a time, guaranteed. Hmmm, no wonder the malpractice is so much less than what a midwife has to pay. After 11 years my top income was around $106,000. $90,000 plus loan repayment and overtime is really hard to hate for a starting salary. If your tastes require more money, hooray, you're a CRNA and you can drive up North and run your own show, make tons of money - the luxury of choice is all yours.

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