Movie: "The Business of Being Born."

  1. http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/trailer.htm

    Has anyone seen this movie? I hear it's great.
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  2. 56 Comments

  3. by   futurecnmstudent
    Quote from epiphany
    http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/trailer.htm

    Has anyone seen this movie? I hear it's great.
    I have not seen it, but after clicking on the link, I would really like to.
  4. by   epiphany
    I'm seeing it soon. Its starting to show in small theaters in a month or so. keep an eye out. The website will link you to where it's being shown.
  5. by   ktliz
    I saw it. It was good--not anything new for those who are already educated about birth choices, but a good "mainstream" movie to introduce home birth & midwifery to the masses.
  6. by   Kiwimid
    About time is all i can say. Gee, you would think that birth was a crisis if you walked into most l&d at the moment. the way the obs talk, the way the women treat their obs like gods and hero's who saved their babies and pelvic floors........:trout::angryfire
  7. by   MalgaBSN
    Anyone seen this yet or going to see it? Thoughts?

    Heres a trailer if you don't know much about it: http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/
  8. by   hope3456
    I bet the hospitals associations aren't happy about this movie......

    L&D is a profitable business for hospitals (so I've heard) and the faster the mom and baby are 'in and out' the better.
  9. by   beckinben
    I saw it at a screening last fall. I thought it was fabulous, and I will buy a copy when it comes out on DVD.

    I was expecting a harsh treatment of OB's, but I felt it really presented them as being products of their education - which I agree with. If you don't see anything other than highly managed birth as a resident, and you are trained with the viewpoint of a surgeon, why would you practice differently after residency?

    Hospitals I thought took the brunt of the criticism, and I agree with that too. It is hard as a practitioner to buck hospital protocols.

    Quote from hope3456
    L&D is a profitable business for hospitals (so I've heard) and the faster the mom and baby are 'in and out' the better.
    What I don't get, though, is that (in my experience) inductions take up much more time and resources than spontanous labor. The docs at my hospital are lobbying for more weekend induction slots, because there aren't enough rooms available for all the inductions they want to do during the week. Maybe that's because the room turnover is just not there when you have 2-3 day long inductions of unfavorable primips, ya think? (I'll get off my soapbox now)
  10. by   MalgaBSN
    Beckinben~ I agree. Maybe the inductions are just mostly for control on timing? Most inductions end the day they are scheduled or a c/sec is done around 5 anyway?! And induction schedules where I work are really crazy right before Christmas, Holidays, vacations, etc.
  11. by   dawngloves
    Quote from hope3456
    I bet the hospitals associations aren't happy about this movie......

    L&D is a profitable business for hospitals (so I've heard) and the faster the mom and baby are 'in and out' the better.
    Then why are so many hospitals closing their L&D units?
    There are a lot of points I could argue from what I saw in the trailer. The U.S. has such a high infant mortality because of advances in neonatal care. We will resusitate a 23 weeker, where as, they will not in Switzerland. And when that infant expires, that boost up our rate.Same thing with infertility treatments.We do this more than any industrailized nation as well. HOM have a high mortality rate. If triplets deliver at 24 weeks...
    There aren't many practicing Midwives because of the litigenous society we live in. The hospitals can't afford them and so many cannot afford to practice because of the cost of insurance. Does that need to change? Yes!
    Do we need to stop the elective inductions and c/s? Yes!
    Does all the blame lie on hospital CEOs? No.
  12. by   eden
    I will see this when it comes out on DVD. From everything I see and read about maternity care in the US, it doesn't look like the system is working (ie the c/s rates are soaring).
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    COMPLICATED issue.

    Lots of good points in that documentary to be sure. But just as alarming to me, anyhow, is the unwillingness by so many to take personal responsibility for their own health/wellness and birth experiences. (which Ricki does address as well).

    Another important sticking point as far as I am concerned: We have to somehow get a grip on the insurance and legal industries, not just the medical ones! JMO anyhow after 10 years "in the business" myself.

    One of the biggest problems IMO: We are dealing with a fast-food society and self-centeredness that is so pervasive, it shocks me from time to time. How many times have I seen a mom-to-be who wanted to have a baby on her "schedule" for whatever reason? And the new desire by so many primips to have c/section to avoid "vaginal delivery" trauma/complications or "anxiety"? I see this everyday. They push our doctors to their limits, sometimes. We have heard of them waiting in their offices, in tears, because they reached their due dates and not in labor yet and want them to "do something NOW!" So what do you think happens? Often, they get their way!

    I will definately buy the DVD when it comes out. But I also know this issue is hugely complicated and goes beyond merely the greed of the medical profession it discusses at length......

    We all share responsibility/culpability here, I am afraid, as a society. Push Mother Nature too hard, and she will give you a hearty shove right back. That is what I have said for years regarding my work in L/D nursing. It holds true almost every time!
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 6, '08
  14. by   33-weeker
    Quote from dawngloves
    Then why are so many hospitals closing their L&D units?
    Could the difference be the ratio of 'paying' vs. non-paying/medicaid patients?

    I imagine that a hospital caring for mostly privately-insured patients probably turns a profit, where one with a majority of uninsured and medicaid patients struggles to keep the unit open.

    The uninsured and limited PNC/medicaid babies also require more expensive testing and care on average - more preemies, more CBC & blood culture draws/+ 48 hr. stay for unknown GBS, + drug screens with extended boarder-baby stays while CPS places them, etc...

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