How does one become a midwife?

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    can anyone tell me? thanks
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    In the US? You get your BSN, work as a L&D nurse and then go back to school for your degree in midwifery. Most states now require the Masters degree so it takes about 2 years full time.
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    Or one can go into lay midwifery, depending on State. In some states, this is not recognized or legal. The lay midwife is not necessarily a licensed nurse, but goes through often very much intense internship with experienced midwives, in order to learn her skills and trade.

    If you want to go the Certified Nurse Midwife route, fergus is right. You need first, to become an RN, and it is recommended you get some training in labor/delivery as an RN first, then go on to graduate school, with an emphasis on certified nurse midwifery. (this would be a Master's degree program).

    Good luck in your endeavors.
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    I forgot all about lay midwives! I've never worked with one, though one of my cousins used one when she had her daughter....
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    There are also different types of lay midwives, though the names vary by area. Certified Professional Midwives get a degree from a MEAC accredited school of midwifery AND do clinical work in an apprenticeship. They take the NARM test and receive certification.

    Traditional Midwives work one on one with an experienced midwife, doing home study and attending births in an apprenticeship. These midwives are not licensed or certified but are no less skilled.

    I'm six months into a three year apprenticeship as a traditional midwife. I do plan on pursuing NARM certification, however, so I can work in states that require it for licensure.
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    Here are some great links about midwifery:

    Great page explaining midwifery terms, since they can be confusing I think this is definitely the place to start for information: http://www.mana.org/definitions.html

    Info about certified nurse-midwifery (CNM): http://www.midwife.org/edu/

    Info about direct-entry midwifery from MEAC. "Programs accredited by MEAC shall provide the student with the requirements necessary to qualify for the NARM examination leading to certification as a Certified Professional Midwife (CPM): http://www.meacschools.org/

    (MANA) Midwives Alliance of North America "The mission of MANA is to provide a nurturing forum for support and cooperation among midwives." http://www.mana.org

    How to become a certified professional midwife (CPM), (which is a type of direct-entry (non-nurse) midwife): http://www.narm.org/pdffiles/htbmar04.pdf

    Midwives Model of Care: http://www.narm.org/htb.htm#mmoc

    Great chart with state direct-entry midwifery laws: http://www.mana.org/statechart.html
    Last edit by mitchsmom on Feb 4, '05
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    Once you are ready to go for your CNM grad study, you should interview with schools about their requirements for CNM applicants. I have spoke to a few, and found out that their requirements differ. One reputable school has even advised that I DON'T work in L&D before entering, because they don't want their students picking up any bad habits.
  11. 0
    Quote from epiphany
    Once you are ready to go for your CNM grad study, you should interview with schools about their requirements for CNM applicants. I have spoke to a few, and found out that their requirements differ. One reputable school has even advised that I DON'T work in L&D before entering, because they don't want their students picking up any bad habits.
    did they enlighten you as to what those bad habits are? Just curious.
  12. 0
    Quote from epiphany
    Once you are ready to go for your CNM grad study, you should interview with schools about their requirements for CNM applicants. I have spoke to a few, and found out that their requirements differ. One reputable school has even advised that I DON'T work in L&D before entering, because they don't want their students picking up any bad habits.
    I love it. Now that's funny!! Bad habits, indeed..........
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    Please understand: I do NOT want this to turn into a flame-fest. I would like earnest dialogue and hope to learn something.

    I am just curious as to the schools of thought that teach future certified nurse midwives that we OB nurses have bad habits, and what those are perceived to be. What schools are turning down prior OB nurses in pursuit of certified nurse midwives that would have no bad habits from prior L/D experience? Cause the universities here, I have never heard of saying such things. It's news to me. I am in no way interested in starting a fight. This is honestly the first time I have ever heard this! Can you please expound on this?


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